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I want to check if a list of stored procedures exist. I want this all to be done in 1 script, one by one. So far I have this format:

USE [myDatabase]
GO

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE type = 'P' AND name = 'sp_1')
BEGIN
CREATE PROCEDURE sp_1
AS
.................
END
GO

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE type = 'P' AND name = 'sp_2')
BEGIN
CREATE PROCEDURE sp_2
AS
.................
END
GO

and so on. However, I'm getting the following error:

Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'Procedure'.

Why isn't what I'm doing working correctly?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

CREATE PROCEDURE must be the first statement in the batch. I usually do something like this:

IF EXISTS (
        SELECT type_desc, type
        FROM sys.procedures WITH(NOLOCK)
        WHERE NAME = 'procname'
            AND type = 'P'
      )
     DROP PROCEDURE dbo.procname
GO

CREATE PROC dbo.procname

AS
....

    GO
    GRANT EXECUTE ON dbo.MyProc TO MyUser 

(don't forget grant statements since they'll be lost if you recreate your proc)

One other thing to consider when you are deploying stored procedures is that a drop can succeed and a create fail. I always write my SQL scripts with a rollback in the event of a problem. Just make sure you don't accidentally delete the commit/rollback code at the end, otherwise your DBA might crane-kick you in the trachea :)

BEGIN TRAN 
IF EXISTS (
       SELECT type_desc, type
       FROM sys.procedures WITH(NOLOCK)
       WHERE NAME = 'myProc'
           AND type = 'P'
     )
DROP PROCEDURE myProc GO
CREATE PROCEDURE myProc

AS
   --proc logic here

GO
-- BEGIN DO NOT REMOVE THIS CODE (it commits or rolls back the stored procedure drop) IF EXISTS (
       SELECT 1
       FROM sys.procedures WITH(NOLOCK)
       WHERE NAME = 'DatasetDeleteCleanup'
           AND type = 'P'
     )
COMMIT TRAN
ELSE
ROLLBACK TRAN
-- END DO NOT REMOVE THIS CODE
share|improve this answer
    
That ended up being the issue. Originally, I was told not to drop the tables, but I was unable to have Create Procedure after the if statement because it wasn't the first command in the batch. Just one of Microsoft's weird rules I was not aware of. Thank you! –  Sean Smyth Apr 8 at 23:52
    
so much work to rollback, etc. why not use ALTER, like how I show in my answer. When using an 'ALTER, if the new code fails you still have the old version and you never lose permissions like you do when you DROP. Too bad SQL Server doesn't have Oracle's create or replace procedure. –  KM. Apr 10 at 15:54
    
@KM. One could say the same thing "...so much work..." about dynamic sql stub creation :). It all comes down to personal preference, they are both perfectly valid approaches just different strokes/different folks. Regardless, I still prefer/recommend explicit existence checks over the try/catch approach. –  Code Magician Apr 10 at 16:08
    
I do wish MS would implement a CREATE OR ALTER... I have no idea why we're all still doing workaround like this when other DBMSs have solved this years ago. –  Code Magician Apr 10 at 16:10
    
your rollback seems much more fragile, especially at the end of the procedure where a simple cut/paste accident could easily loose them. –  KM. Apr 10 at 16:20

One idiom that I've been using lately that I like quite a lot is:

if exists (select 1 from sys.objects where object_id = object_id('dbo.yourProc'))
   set noexec on
go
create procedure dbo.yourProc as
begin
   select 1 as [not yet implemented]
end
go
set noexec off
alter procedure dbo.yourProc as
begin
   /*body of procedure here*/
end

Essentially, you're creating a stub if the procedure doesn't exist and then altering either the stub (if it was just created) or the pre-existing procedure. The nice thing about this is that you don't drop a pre-existing procedure which drops all the permissions as well. You can also cause issues with any application that happens to want it in that brief instant where it doesn't exist.

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+1 I've never seen this approach before. Clever use of NOEXEC! –  Code Magician Apr 10 at 16:12
    
I didn't invent it, but I got it from here: simple-talk.com/sql/database-administration/… –  Ben Thul Apr 10 at 17:24

I like to use ALTER so I don't lose permissions and if you have a syntax error the old version still exists:

BEGIN TRY
    --if procedure does not exist, create a simple version that the ALTER will replace.  if it does exist, the BEGIN CATCH will eliminate any error message or batch stoppage
    EXEC ('CREATE PROCEDURE AAAAAAAA AS DECLARE @A varchar(100); SET @A=ISNULL(OBJECT_NAME(@@PROCID), ''unknown'')+'' was not created!''; RAISERROR(@A,16,1);return 9999')
END TRY BEGIN CATCH END CATCH
GO

ALTER PROCEDURE AAAAAAAA 
(
     @ParamsHere varchar(10)
)
AS
PRINT 'HERE IN '+(OBJECT_NAME(@@PROCID))
GO
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for having RAISEERROR in your stub instead of some noop. I'd rather have a stub fail loudly than do nothing silently. –  Code Magician Apr 10 at 16:26
USE [myDatabase]
GO

IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE type = 'P' AND name = 'sp_1')
BEGIN
  DROP PROCEDURE sp_1
END
GO   --<-- Add a Batch Separator here



CREATE PROCEDURE sp_1
AS
.................
END
GO
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