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The input file contains 14 state initials (TN,CA,NB,FL,etc..) that is to be rad into the array. The code below clears compiler but when i tell the program the filename it shoots out a bunch of blank spaces with two spaces containing some fuzz and a third contain a '@' symbol. i assume the problem is with my function not entirely sure what specifically though any help greatly appreciated!

input file set up with state initials one on top of the other:

TN PA KY MN CA and so on

void readstate( ifstream& input, string []);
int main()
{
   string stateInitials[14];
   char filename[256];
   ifstream input;

   cout << "Enter file name: ";
   cin >> filename;

   input.open( filename );

   if ( input.fail())
   {
      cout << " file open fail" << endl;
   }
   readstate ( input, stateInitials); 

   input.close();

   return (0);
}

void readstate ( ifstream& input, string stateInitials[])
{
   int count;  

   for ( count = 0; count <= MAX_ENTRIES; count++)
   {
       input >> stateInitials[count];
       cout << stateInitials[count] << endl;
   }
}   
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having problem reading data as well have tried to use getline(). more specifically getline( input, stateInitials) and i get an invalid onversion error from void* to char* and a cannot convert char* to size_t*. not sure what the '*' are for teacher never discussed them. –  user3317020 Apr 9 '14 at 1:35
    
How exactly is your input file formated? Is it one line per initial? All the initial clumped together with no spaces? Comma separated? Tab delimited? –  merlin2011 Apr 9 '14 at 1:36
    
okay i got the program to read the characters in the file. but instea of for example printing out 'KY', i get 'K' on one line and 'Y' on the one below it. the file is set with bot characters together one on top of the other. one long column. –  user3317020 Apr 9 '14 at 1:38
    
readstate doesn't read anything unless you didn't include that code. –  Retired Ninja Apr 9 '14 at 1:42
    
havent added the read code for readstate function. figured that out after i posted –  user3317020 Apr 9 '14 at 1:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are treating a character array as though it were a string array. While you can hack put the strings next to each other inside the same char array, that is not the standard way it is done. Here is a modified version of your code, which creates one char[] to hold each initial.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>



#define MAX_ENTRIES 14

using namespace std;
void readstate( ifstream& input, char* []);
int main()
{
   char** stateInitials = new char*[14];
   char filename[256];
   ifstream input;

   cout << "Enter file name: ";
   cin >> filename;

   input.open( filename );

   if ( input.fail())
   {
      cout << " file open fail" << endl;
   }
   readstate ( input, stateInitials); 

   // After you are done, you should clean up
   for ( int i = 0; i <= MAX_ENTRIES; i++) delete stateInitials[i];
   delete stateInitials;
   return (0);
}

void readstate ( ifstream& input, char* stateInitials[])
{
   int count;  

   string temp_buf;
   for ( count = 0; count <= MAX_ENTRIES; count++)
   {
       stateInitials[count] = new char[3];

       input >> temp_buf;
       memcpy(stateInitials[count], temp_buf.c_str(), 3);
       cout << stateInitials[count] << endl;
   }
}   
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