Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

This is a piece of homework for my programming course. We are asked to make a function that accepts a list of strings as a parameter, and then returns the same list of strings but without duplicates.
e.g:

>>> unique_list(['dog','cat','dog','fish'])
['dog','cat','fish']

Any information regarding the matter would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by thefourtheye, zhangxaochen, Bakuriu, Code Lღver, Ankur Apr 9 at 6:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
What have you tried till now? –  thefourtheye Apr 9 at 5:42
    
Does the order in which you return the strings matter? –  NPE Apr 9 at 5:43
2  
Read up on sets. –  NPE Apr 9 at 5:44
    
First time using this website, was not dissapointed, this is an excellent resource. Thank you to all who helped me in answering this question. –  dehvud Apr 9 at 23:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use the following code:

>>> def unique_list(mylist):
...     copy = []
...     for k in mylist:
...             if k not in copy:
...                     copy.append(k)
...     return copy
... 
>>> unique_list([1])
[1]
>>> unique_list([1, 1])
[1]
>>> unique_list([1, 1, 2])
[1, 2]
>>> unique_list([1, 3, 1, 2])
[1, 3, 2]
>>> unique_list(['dog','cat','dog','fish'])
['dog', 'cat', 'fish']

The for loop loops over every item in mylist. If the item is already in copy, it does nothing. Otherwise, it adds the item to copy. At the end, we return the 'unduplicatified' version of mylist, stored in copy.

Or a one-liner would be:

>>> def unique_list(mylist):
...     return list(set(mylist))
... 
>>> unique_list([1])
[1]
>>> unique_list([1, 1])
[1]
>>> unique_list([1, 1, 2])
[1, 2]
>>> unique_list([1, 3, 1, 2])
[1, 2, 3]
>>> unique_list(['dog','cat','dog','fish'])
['fish', 'dog', 'cat'] 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this is very useful information. I see I was missing the append option in my trials, now I can play around with it. Also, that set function looks incredibly useful aswell, will definently give that a go. –  dehvud Apr 9 at 23:05
    
Glad to be of help! :) –  A.J. Apr 10 at 0:00

You can use collections.OrderedDict, like this

from collections import OrderedDict
def unique_list(seq):
    return list(OrderedDict.fromkeys(seq))

print(unique_list(['dog','cat','dog','fish']))
# ['dog', 'cat', 'fish']

Or the bruteforce approach would be to maintain the seen items in a set and if it repeats simply ignore it.

def unique_list(seq):
    seen, result = set(), []
    for item in seq:
        if item not in seen:
            seen.add(item)
            result.append(item)
    return result

print(unique_list(['dog','cat','dog','fish']))
# ['dog', 'cat', 'fish']
share|improve this answer
1  
I thought you would mark it as duplicate.. –  zhangxaochen Apr 9 at 5:45
    
@zhangxaochen Did you manage to find a good dup question? I couldnt :( –  thefourtheye Apr 9 at 5:46
1  
Ain't here we have the exact answer? stackoverflow.com/questions/7961363/… –  zhangxaochen Apr 9 at 5:49
    
@zhangxaochen Awesome, I dup voted it. Thanks :) –  thefourtheye Apr 9 at 5:50
def unique_list(subject):
    return list(set(subject))

This is what you can write in python 3.3

share|improve this answer
    
Oops, now I see @aj8uppal already mentioned it in the lower section of his answer. :( –  giga Apr 9 at 6:18

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.