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I am learning Scala at the moment via Odersky's Programming Scala 2nd book and have just covered chapter 6 which discusses functional objects. In that chapter, the main example centres around creating a class to represent Rational numbers and arithmetic of rational numbers.

His cut-down class looks like:

class Rational (n : Int, d : Int) {

  val numer : Int = n
  val denom : Int = d

  def add (that: Rational) : Rational = 
    new Rational (
      numer * that.denom + that.numer * denom, denom * that.denom)
}

In order to achieve immutability, he has introduced two new variables, numer and denom, which represent the same concepts as class parameters, n and d. Based on my knowledge so far, this means that if I want to create immutable functional objects in Scala, I always have to go through the process of creating duplicates of my class parameters which can be very tedious. For example, if I wanted to create a class to represent a trade, I would have to do this:

class Trade (
              direction : Char,
              instrument : Instrument,
              price : BigDecimal,
              quantity : BigDecimal,
              counterparty : Party

            )
{

  val direction_ = direction
  val instrument_ = instrument
  val price_ = price
  val quantity_ = quantity
  val counterparty_ = counterparty

  // some great methods below...

}

The only way around this which I have thought about is to put underscores after the variable names as above because I can't think of another name for direction, instrument, price etc. I would like to know what is the best practice here that other Scala programmers have found to avoid getting into variable-naming-paralysis mode.

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This question reminded me what an interesting book that was. The early example was for teaching purposes. It returns in ch 20 on traits, also for teaching purposes. –  som-snytt Apr 9 at 8:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the reason for creating the copy of the injected constructor objects is primarily to be able to expose them externally, then you can instead write:

class Trade (
              val direction : Char,
              val instrument : Instrument,
              val price : BigDecimal,
              val quantity : BigDecimal,
              val counterparty : Party)
{
  // some great methods below...

}

or even better, use case classes: http://www.scala-lang.org/old/node/107

case class Trade (
              direction : Char,
              instrument : Instrument,
              price : BigDecimal,
              quantity : BigDecimal,
              counterparty : Party) {
  // some great methods below...

}
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2  
Yah, the difference is that a classes constructor arguments are private by default, and adding val makes them public. Whereas case class's arguments are public by default –  Justin Pihony Apr 9 at 6:03
    
The reason is not to expose the constructor objects externally but rather to achieve immutability by returning a new Trade object whenever there is an update in one of its fields. So for example, if the price was updated, I would have a method that would take the new price and return a new Trade object with that price. Similar to the add method in the Rational class. –  I.K. Apr 9 at 6:14
1  
Then, this should depend on internal implementation of the class (if the only way to change the class state is via injecting parameters at a construction time then it is immutable). Moreover the use case you're describing is nicely supported with case classes, which come with the copy method for free - so, to get a copy of the trade with the updated price you can just do val newTrade = existingTrade.copy(price = 103.23) –  Norbert Radyk Apr 9 at 6:31
    
@Norbert, an offshot question: will the JVM do adequate GC on the old version of the Trade objects? –  I.K. Apr 9 at 12:28
2  
@I.K. please, define adequate. If reference is still in use (either, that object or it's fields), it will be there, if it is abadoned (previous case class instance is thrown away or field is overrided via copying), it will be collected –  om-nom-nom Apr 9 at 15:03

You could just define your class Trade like this:

class Trade(val direction: Char, val instrument: Instrument, ...) // etc

In other words, put val in front of the constructor parameters. No need for all the duplication.

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You don't have to create duplicates. You can do:

class Rational (val n : Int, val d : Int)

This gives You class with immutable fields n and d Or You can use case class

 case class Rational (n : Int, d : Int)
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A side note on Rational implementation,

case class Rational (n : Int, d : Int) {
  def +(that: Rational) = Rational (n*that.d + that.n*d, d*that.d)
}

Here the + operator is overloaded to operate on Rational. Then

val a = Rational(1,2)
val b = Rational(3,4)
val c = a+b

and so

c: Rational = Rational(10,8)
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