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I'm generating XML in a view:

$xml = Xml::build($data, array('return' => 'domdocument'));
echo $xml->saveXML();

View is fed from the controller with an array:

$this->set(
    array(
        'data' => array(
            'root' => array(
                array(
                    '@id' => 'A & B: OK',
                    'name' => 'C & D: OK',
                    'sub1' => array(
                        '@id' => 'E & F: OK',
                        'name' => 'G & H: OK',
                        'sub2' => array(
                            array(
                                '@id' => 'I & J: OK',
                                'name' => 'K & L: OK',
                                'sub3' => array(
                                    '@id' => 'M & N: OK',
                                    'name' => 'O & P: OK',
                                    'sub4' => array(
                                        '@id' => 'Q & R: OK',
                                        '@'   => 'S & T: ERROR',
                                    ),
                                ),
                            ),
                        ),
                    ),
                ),
            ),
        ),
    )
);

For whatever the reason, CakePHP is issuing an internal call like this:

$dom = new DOMDocument;
$key = 'sub4';
$childValue = 'S & T: ERROR';
$dom->createElement($key, $childValue);

... which triggers a PHP warning:

Warning (2): DOMDocument::createElement(): unterminated entity reference               T [CORE\Cake\Utility\Xml.php, line 292

... because (as documented), DOMDocument::createElement does not escape values. However, it only does it in certain nodes, as the test case illustrates.

Am I doing something wrong or I just hit a bug in CakePHP?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

This might a bug in PHPs DOMDocument::createElement() method. You can avoid it. Create the textnode separately and append it to the element node.

$dom = new DOMDocument;
$dom
  ->appendChild($dom->createElement('element'))
  ->appendChild($dom->createTextNode('S & T: ERROR'));

var_dump($dom->saveXml());

Output: https://eval.in/134277

string(58) "<?xml version="1.0"?>
<element>S &amp; T: ERROR</element>
"

This is the intended way to add text nodes to a DOM. You always create a node (element, text , cdata, ...) and append it to its parent node. You can add more then one node and different kind of nodes to one parent. Like in the following example:

$dom = new DOMDocument;
$p = $dom->appendChild($dom->createElement('p'));
$p->appendChild($dom->createTextNode('Hello '));
$b = $p->appendChild($dom->createElement('b'));
$b->appendChild($dom->createTextNode('World!'));

echo $dom->saveXml();

Output:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<p>Hello <b>World!</b></p>
share|improve this answer
    
I haven't tested whether you can insert DOMDocument objects in the data array but, if you know beforehand what values need fixing¹, this is a quite convoluted workaround :) —— (¹) I didn't know when I asked the question. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Apr 9 at 9:32
    
Actually this is not a workaround. The second argument in createElement() breaks the W3C DOM spec. The example above is the standard way to add text nodes. The argument in the method is just a shortcut - a broken one. –  ThW Apr 9 at 9:35

it is because of this character: & You need to replace that with the relevant HTML entity. &amp; To perform the translation, you can use the htmlspecialchars function. You have to escape the value when writing writing to the nodeValue property. As quoted from a bug report in 2005 located here

ampersands ARE properly encoded when setting the property textContent. Unfortunately they are not encoded when the text string is passed as the optional second arguement to DOMElement::createElement You must create a text node, set the textContent, then append the text node to the new element.

htmlspecialchars($string, ENT_QUOTES, 'UTF-8');

This is the translation table:

'&' (ampersand) becomes '&amp;'
'"' (double quote) becomes '&quot;' when ENT_NOQUOTES is not set.
"'" (single quote) becomes '&#039;' (or &apos;) only when ENT_QUOTES is set.
'<' (less than) becomes '&lt;'
'>' (greater than) becomes '&gt;'

This script will do the translations recursively:

<?php
function clean($type) {
  if(is_array($type)) {
    foreach($type as $key => $value){   
     $type[$key] = clean($value);
    }
    return $type;
  } else {
    $string = htmlspecialchars($type, ENT_QUOTES, 'UTF-8');
    return $string;
  }
}

$data = array(
    'data' => array(
        'root' => array(
            array(
                '@id' => 'A & B: OK',
                'name' => 'C & D: OK',
                'sub1' => array(
                    '@id' => 'E & F: OK',
                    'name' => 'G & H: OK',
                    'sub2' => array(
                        array(
                            '@id' => 'I & J: OK',
                            'name' => 'K & L: OK',
                            'sub3' => array(
                                '@id' => 'M & N: OK',
                                'name' => 'O & P: OK',
                                'sub4' => array(
                                    '@id' => 'Q & R: OK',
                                    '@' => 'S & T: ERROR',
                                ) ,
                            ) ,
                        ) ,
                    ) ,
                ) ,
            ) ,
        ) ,
    ) ,
);

$data = clean($data);

Output

Array
(
    [data] => Array
        (
            [root] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [@id] => A &amp; B: OK
                            [name] => C &amp; D: OK
                            [sub1] => Array
                                (
                                    [@id] => E &amp; F: OK
                                    [name] => G &amp; H: OK
                                    [sub2] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [@id] => I &amp; J: OK
                                                    [name] => K &amp; L: OK
                                                    [sub3] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [@id] => M &amp; N: OK
                                                            [name] => O &amp; P: OK
                                                            [sub4] => Array
                                                                (
                                                                    [@id] => Q &amp; R: OK
                                                                    [@] => S &amp; T: ERROR
                                                                )

                                                        )

                                                )

                                        )

                                )

                        )

                )

        )

)
share|improve this answer
    
The OP clearly states that it's a warning - but wants to understand the reason for it. Simply ignoring warning is a very bad idea. –  Aleks G Apr 9 at 8:04
    
Suppressing the message doesn't fix the underlying problem. It's like sticking your fingers in your ears and singing at the top of your voice. –  Hobo Sapiens Apr 9 at 8:05
    
It does fix it in some contexts. –  self Apr 9 at 8:05
    
Are you sure? Docs don't mention the need to pre-process data manually and my example does the right thing in every other value with ampersands... –  Álvaro G. Vicario Apr 9 at 8:09
    
DOMDocument is a native PHP class, so I believe CakePHP and PHP the programming language are mutually exclusive here. –  self Apr 9 at 8:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem seems to be in nodes that have both attributes and values thus need to use the @ syntax:

'@id' => 'A & B: OK',  // <-- Handled as plain text
'name' => 'C & D: OK', // <-- Handled as plain text
'@' => 'S & T: ERROR', // <-- Handled as raw XML

I've written a little helper function:

protected function escapeXmlValue($value){
    return is_null($value) ? null : h($value);
}

... and take care of calling it manually when I create the array:

'@id' => 'A & B: OK',
'name' => 'C & D: OK',
'@' => $this->escapeXmlValue('S & T: NOW WORKS FINE'),

It's hard to say if it's bug or feature since the documentation doesn't mention it.

share|improve this answer

This is in fact because the DOMDocument methods wants correct characters to be outputted in html; that is, characters such as & will break content and generate a unterminated entity reference error

just htmlentities() it before using it to create elements:

$dom = new DOMDocument;
$key = 'sub4';
$childValue = htmlentities('S & T: ERROR');
$dom->createElement($key ,$childValue);
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