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I was interested to have the following getNumberOfDecimalPlace function :

    System.out.println("0 = " + Utils.getNumberOfDecimalPlace(0));          // 0
    System.out.println("1.0 = " + Utils.getNumberOfDecimalPlace(1.0));      // 0
    System.out.println("1.01 = " + Utils.getNumberOfDecimalPlace(1.01));    // 2
    System.out.println("1.012 = " + Utils.getNumberOfDecimalPlace(1.012));  // 3
    System.out.println("0.01 = " + Utils.getNumberOfDecimalPlace(0.01));    // 2
    System.out.println("0.012 = " + Utils.getNumberOfDecimalPlace(0.012));  // 3

May I know how can I implement getNumberOfDecimalPlace, by using BigDecimal?

The following code doesn't work as expected :

public static int getNumberOfDecimalPlace(double value) {
    final BigDecimal bigDecimal = new BigDecimal("" + value);
    final String s = bigDecimal.toPlainString();
    System.out.println(s);
    final int index = s.indexOf('.');
    if (index < 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    return s.length() - 1 - index;
}

The following get printed :

0.0
0 = 1
1.0
1.0 = 1
1.01
1.01 = 2
1.012
1.012 = 3
0.01
0.01 = 2
0.012
0.012 = 3

However, for case 0, 1.0, it doesn't work well. I expect, "0" as result. But they turned out to be "0.0" and "1.0". This will return "1" as result.

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1  
You are planning your input parameter to be BigDecimal or just internally to use BigDecimal? Cause in your code example input parameter would be just a double. –  Nils Schmidt Feb 19 '10 at 12:13
    
I found solutions here useful for implementation of the function: stackoverflow.com/questions/6264576/… –  JackDev Dec 13 '12 at 4:01
    
Which "Utils" is this? –  james.garriss Aug 7 '13 at 23:43

9 Answers 9

up vote -4 down vote accepted

Why not just change your code to get a doubles decimal places?

public static int getNumberOfDecimalPlace(double value) {
    //For whole numbers like 0
    if (Math.round(value) == value) return 0;
    final String s = Double.toString(value);
    System.out.println(s);
    final int index = s.indexOf('.');
    if (index < 0) {
       return 0;
    }
    return s.length() - 1 - index;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't work. If you pass in 0, it will print out as 0.0 –  Cheok Yan Cheng Feb 19 '10 at 12:24
    
then do a special case for 0 –  Valentin Rocher Feb 19 '10 at 12:29
    
Special case added :-) –  Clinton Feb 19 '10 at 12:36
3  
@Valentin: Because the use of double is the fundamental problem. This is a step into exactly the wrong direction. –  Michael Borgwardt Feb 19 '10 at 12:49
    
It does not work for double with large number of decimal places, for example 0.0000000000000000000000000000001. Double.toString(double) will return 1.0E-31. Your whole logic fails –  Adi Feb 19 '10 at 12:49

This code:

int getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(BigDecimal bigDecimal) {
    String string = bigDecimal.stripTrailingZeros().toPlainString();
    int index = string.indexOf(".");
    return index < 0 ? 0 : string.length() - index - 1;
}

... passes these tests:

assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("0.001")), equalTo(3));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("0.01")), equalTo(2));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("0.1")), equalTo(1));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("1.000")), equalTo(0));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("1.00")), equalTo(0));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("1.0")), equalTo(0));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("1")), equalTo(0));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("10")), equalTo(0));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("10.1")), equalTo(1));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("10.01")), equalTo(2));
assertThat(getNumberOfDecimalPlaces(new BigDecimal("10.001")), equalTo(3));

... if that is indeed what you want. The other replies are correct, you have to use BigDecimal all the way through for this rather than double/float.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the only right answer on the page. Why? Because @Robert uses stripTrailingZeros() to distinguish those decimal places that are truly significant. Well done, Robert. –  james.garriss Aug 27 '13 at 23:58
1  
@Robert Atkins warning, gives me 1 with "0.0", should be 0. –  killer_PL Feb 9 '14 at 20:18
    
you can return 0 when scale() <= 0 or signum() == 0, you can also avoid some toString()-thing that way. –  Gianluca P. May 9 '14 at 13:18

It's not your code that's wrong, but your expectations. double is based on a binary floating point representation and completely unfit for accurately representing decimal fractions. Decimal 0.1 e.g. has an infinite number of digits when represented in binary, thus it gets truncated and when converted back to decimal, you get erros in the least significant digits.

If you use BigDecimal exclusively, your code will work as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
"If you use BigDecimal exclusively, your code will work as expected." --> ? But it doesn't work for my case. –  Cheok Yan Cheng Feb 19 '10 at 12:48
    
@Yan: you're not using BigDecimal exclusively. You must not use any double or float values including any literals of those types. –  Joachim Sauer Feb 19 '10 at 12:52
2  
@Yan: It does not work because you use double as your input parameter type. You have to avoid the use of double completely, because the second you put your decimal value into a double (even as an intermediate result), you have already corrupted it. –  Michael Borgwardt Feb 19 '10 at 12:52
    
The problem with this answer is that even if the OP's code is converted to only use BigDecimals, it still won't work. Why not? Because it does not distinguish between decimal places and significant decimal places. –  james.garriss Aug 27 '13 at 23:54

If you really get doubles i recommend formating them first as strings before creating the BigDecimal. At least that has worked for me: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/264937/how-to-check-if-a-double-has-at-most-n-decimal-places

Depending on how many digits you expect you can either use standard formating like

String.valueOf(doubleValue);

or you could use specialised formatting to avoid exponential format

DecimalFormat decimalFormat = new DecimalFormat();
decimalFormat.setMaximumIntegerDigits(Integer.MAX_VALUE);
// don't use grouping for numeric-type cells
decimalFormat.setGroupingUsed(false);
decimalFormat.setDecimalFormatSymbols(new DecimalFormatSymbols(Locale.US));
value = decimalFormat.format(numericValue);

When you have a BigDecimal you can simply call scale() to get the number of decimal places.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the scale() mention –  chburd Oct 10 '12 at 14:47
1  
The problem with scale() is that it fails to distinguish between decimal places and significant decimal places. It returns "1" for "1.0" when it should return 0, per the OP's request. –  james.garriss Aug 27 '13 at 23:50

Try this:

Math.floor(Math.log(x) / Math.log(10))
0.001 = -3
0.01  = -2
0.1   = -1  
1     = 0  
10    = 1  
100   = 2
share|improve this answer
    
This is helpful for getting the position of the first significant number in the value. NB: But for values like 1.124 and I want to get the number of decimal places, it does not work. –  JackDev Dec 13 '12 at 3:54

How about having a look at the javadoc of BigDecimal. I'm not sure, but I'd give getScale and getPercision a try.

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The best way to get a BigDecimal with a specified number of decimal places is by using the setscale method over it. Personally I like to also use the rounding version of the method (see the link below): http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/math/BigDecimal.html#setScale(int,%20int)

If you're wanting to get the number of decimal positions that a BigDecimal is currently set at call the associated scale() method.

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I am not interested in get "a BigDecimal with a specified number of decimal places". I am interested to know "a double with HOW MANY number of decimal places" –  Cheok Yan Cheng Feb 19 '10 at 12:15
    
Ah....that's more of a problem. The issue is that a double is imprecise. For example, you may set the value of a double to 1.25 but when you look at it later the value returns as 1.24999999. This is because of the way that Java stores it. This kinda thing is why I avoid doubles as much as possible. –  SOA Nerd Feb 19 '10 at 12:19
    
the description is correct, the example is not so good. 1.25 can be represented exactly in a double. 1.2 for example can't. –  Joachim Sauer Feb 19 '10 at 12:47
    
@Joachim Yep...sorry. I must be low on coffee today :-). –  SOA Nerd Feb 19 '10 at 12:53

That should do it

int getNumberOfDecimalPlace(BigDecimal number) {
    int scale = number.stripTrailingZeros().scale();
    return scale > 0 ? scale : 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Michael Borgwardt answer is the correct one. As soon as you use any double or float, your values are already corrupted.

To provide a code example:

System.out.println("0 = " + BigDecimalUtil.getNumberOfDecimalPlace("0")); // 0
System.out.println("1.0 = " + BigDecimalUtil.getNumberOfDecimalPlace("1.0")); // 0
System.out.println("1.01 = " + BigDecimalUtil.getNumberOfDecimalPlace(new BigDecimal("1.01"))); // 2
System.out.println("1.012 = " + BigDecimalUtil.getNumberOfDecimalPlace(new BigDecimal("1.012"))); // 3
System.out.println("0.01 = " + BigDecimalUtil.getNumberOfDecimalPlace("0.01")); // 2
System.out.println("0.012 = " + BigDecimalUtil.getNumberOfDecimalPlace("0.012")); // 3
System.out.println("0.00000000000000000012 = " + BigDecimalUtil.getNumberOfDecimalPlace("0.00000000000000000012")); // 20

And an overloaded version of getNumberOfDecimalPlace so you could use it with BigDecimal or String:

public static int getNumberOfDecimalPlace(String value) {
    final int index = value.indexOf('.');
    if (index < 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    return value.length() - 1 - index;
}

public static int getNumberOfDecimalPlace(BigDecimal value) {
    return getNumberOfDecimalPlace(value.toPlainString());
}
share|improve this answer
    
You sure BigDecimalUtil.getNumberOfDecimalPlace("1.0")) going to return 0? –  Cheok Yan Cheng Feb 19 '10 at 14:00
    
The problem with this answer is that it fails to distinguish between decimal places and significant decimal places. As @Cheok rightly pointed out, it returns "1" for "1.0" when it should return 0, per the OP's request. –  james.garriss Aug 27 '13 at 23:45

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