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I've heard that it's possible to poll the url of an iframe for a hash to do something with it from the parent. What i need to do is set the height of a cross domain iframe dynamically. So whenever the height changes, the iframe sets its url to someurl#height. Now i need to access the hash (#height) from the parent, but it still won't let me. Using a proxy (iframe inside an iframe) is not an option in this case. Maybe i'm doing something wrong, how would you poll the url of an iframe?

iframe.contentWindow.location.href - security alert iframe.src - returns the url WITHOUT the hash

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Can you use a cross-domain policy file, or do you not know what domain the iframe is going to access? –  Robusto Feb 19 '10 at 13:30
    

1 Answer 1

That's not usually the way it's done. What should be done, is the iframe calls window.parent.location = "#<iframe height>";, setting the parent to have the hash value of the iframe height.

The parent page uses either the onhashchange event (IE, Firefox) to capture the change and then set the iframe's height or a timer that checks the hash value every 100ms or so. This is how Google CSE does it, at least.

See also my answer to a similar question:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2161906/handle-url-anchor-change-event-in-js

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But will the iframe be able to access window.parent if the parent is on another domain? Isn't that the same security issue? –  Marius Feb 19 '10 at 13:42
    
I've just checked, your solution does work, but ... how can you be able to do that? Why is this not a security violation? –  Marius Feb 19 '10 at 13:49
    
@Marius: You're just changing the parent page location, you're not accessing any data or anything, it's not really a security issue. It could be considered a usability issue (changing the parent page without consent, etc), but in fact the reason it works is to avoid security issues; this is how sites get out of being framed if they don't want to be framed - they just set top.location = window.location;. –  Andy E Feb 19 '10 at 13:56
    
Some properties aren't subject to the cross-domain policy. location is one of them. –  Andy E Feb 19 '10 at 13:58
    
Thanks. Unfortunately, this solution only works in Opera. Firefox and IE go crazy! IE redirects to the iframe's url and firefox ... wow i'm not even sure what it does ;] How could i solve this stuff ? :( –  Marius Feb 19 '10 at 14:43

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