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If I have a JavaScript object such as:

var x = {foo: 42, bar: {fubar: true}}

then I can get the value true with var flag = x.bar.fubar. I'd like to be able to separate out and store the path "bar.fubar", then evaluate it dynamically. Something like:

var paths = ["bar.fubar", ...];
...
var flag = evalPath( x, paths[0] );

Obviously I could write a simple parser and evaluator for a basic path expression grammar. But under DRY principles I wonder if there's already an existing way to do something like evalPath built-in to JavaScript, or a small library that would do the job? I also anticipate needing array indexes in the path expression in future.

Update Just to be clear, I'm not asking for code samples - my question is whether there's existing code (built-in or library) I can re-use. Thanks to the contributors below for suggestions of code samples anyway! Note that none of them handle the array index requirement.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Doing a quick search, I came across JSONPath. Haven't used it at all, but it looks like it might do what you want it to.

Example usage:

var x = {foo: 42, bar: {fubar: true}}
var res1 = jsonPath(x, "$.bar.fubar"); // Array containing fubar's value
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Thanks cmptrgeekken, I also found the same package following a suggestion from Andy E. jsonPath seems to be working well so far –  Ian Dickinson Feb 19 '10 at 16:43

Why not try something like

function evalPath(obj, path)
{
    var rtnValue = obj;

    // Split our path into an array we can iterate over
    var path = path.split(".");
    for (var i = 0, max=path.length; i < max; i++) 
    {
        // If setting current path to return value fails, set to null and break
        if (typeof (rtnValue = rtnValue[path[i]]) == "undefined")
        {
            rtnValue = null;
            break;
        }
    }

    // Return the final path value, or null if it failed
    return rtnValue;
}

Not tested, but it should work fairly well. Like XPath, it will return null if it can't find what it's looking for.

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Thanks Andy. I wasn't actually asking for code, I was asking whether there's a built-in way or a library to do this so I don't have to repeat (and write tests for!) code that's already out there. –  Ian Dickinson Feb 19 '10 at 15:26
    
@Ian Dickinson: fair enough. I haven't ever come across such a thing. I have searched for the same thing on several occasions, just because sometimes it would be easier to have a statement evaluate to null instead of throwing an error because a certain property didn't exist. Kind of like using XPath instead of documentElement.childNodes[0].childNodes[1].childNodes[47] –  Andy E Feb 19 '10 at 15:39
    
Hmm, the XPath analogy was a good suggestion, thanks. I searched "JSON xpath" and came up with: goessner.net/articles/JsonPath. Looks interesting, but I've not had chance to look at it in detail yet. –  Ian Dickinson Feb 19 '10 at 15:56
    
@Ian Dickinson: I never found that when I was searching :-) Good luck. –  Andy E Feb 19 '10 at 16:08

JavaScript provides eval, but I don't recommend it.

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Indeed. I'm aware of eval, and it's not what I'm looking for. –  Ian Dickinson Feb 19 '10 at 15:03

like

function locate(obj, path) {
    var p = path.split("."), a = p.shift();
    if(a in obj)
       return p.length ? locate(obj[a], p.join(".")) : obj[a];
     return undefined;
}

locate(x, "bar.fubar")

this works on the right only, of course

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Thanks stereofrog. I wasn't actually asking for code, I was asking whether there's a built-in way or a library to do this so I don't have to repeat (and write tests for!) code that's already out there. –  Ian Dickinson Feb 19 '10 at 15:28

You could try something like this. I can't really think of a situation where it would be appropriate to store paths this way though.

function evalPath(obj, path) {
  var pathLevels = path.split('.');
  var result = obj;
  for (var i = 0; i < pathLevels.length; i++) {
    try {
      result = result[pathLevels[i]];
    }
    catch (e) {
      alert('Property not found:' + pathLevels[i]);
    }
  }
  return result;
}

The alert is really only there for debugging purposes. You may want to return null or something.

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Thanks ntownsend. I wasn't actually asking for code, I was asking whether there's a built-in way or a library to do this so I don't have to repeat (and write tests for!) code that's already out there. –  Ian Dickinson Feb 19 '10 at 15:27
    
By the way the use case is that I have a AJAX server serving up a fairly complex JSON data structure. The user can project out a variety of facets of the data structure into the UI; the path expressions will be stored as part of an extensible collection of declarative facet specifications. Representing how to map the data from the model to the view, essentially. –  Ian Dickinson Feb 19 '10 at 15:33
    
Ah. Then storing the paths would be appropriate. I've never seen any functionality like this in a library. You may be stuck with doing it yourself :) –  ntownsend Feb 19 '10 at 15:51

How about:

evalPath = function(obj, path) {
  if (path[0] === "[") {
    return eval("obj" + path);
  } else {
    return eval("obj." + path);
  }
};

This has the advantage that it works for arbitrary strings:

evalPath([1,2,3], "[0]"); => 1

evalPath({a:{b:7}}, "a.b"); => 7

This, of course, only works if you really trust your input.

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