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I've faced with strange behavior of java.util.regex.Matcher. Lets consider example:

    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("\\d*");
    String s = "a1b";
    Matcher m = p.matcher(s);
    while(m.find())
    {
        System.out.println(m.start()+" "+m.end());
    }

It produces output:

0 0
1 2
2 2
3 3

I can understant all lines except last. Matcher creates extra group (3,3) out of string. But javadoc for method start() confirms:

start() Returns the start index of the previous match.

The same case for dot-star pattern:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile(".*");
String s = "a1b";
Matcher m = p.matcher(s);
while(m.find())
{
    System.out.println(m.start()+" "+m.end());
}

Output:

0 3
3 3

But if specify line boundaries

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("^.*$");

The output will be "right":

0 3

Can someone explain me а reason of such behavior?

share|improve this question
    
* signifies 0 or more. Nothing is 0. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Apr 9 at 18:52
1  
Have you tried changing * to +? –  Pshemo Apr 9 at 18:52
    
Also this may interest you a little. –  Pshemo Apr 9 at 18:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The pattern "\\d*" matches 0 or more digits. Same stands for ".*". It matches 0 or more occurrence of any character except newline.

The last match that you get is the empty string at the end of your string, after "b". The empty string satisfies the pattern \\d*. If you change the pattern to \\d+, you'll get expected result.

Similarly, the pattern .* matches everything from first character to last character. Thus it first matches "a1b". After that the cursor is after b: "a1b|". Now, matcher.find() again runs, and finds a zero-length string at the cursor, which satisifies the pattern .*, so it considers it as a match.

The reason why it gives expected output with "^.*$" is that the last empty string doesn't satisfy the ^ anchor. It is not at the beginning of the string, so it fails to match.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you are right about \\d+ , but what "empty string" do you mean? I didn't see any in javadocs. –  Gusev Dmitry Apr 9 at 18:56
    
@user3516622 Empty string is the one after the last character of the string. Technically, there is an empty character after and before every character in a string. –  Rohit Jain Apr 9 at 18:58
    
I understood. Thank you for help! –  Gusev Dmitry Apr 9 at 19:05
    
@user3516622 You're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Apr 9 at 19:08

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