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I am starting to learn about objects in Perl using Moose.

I am not sure if I understand the purpose of MooseX::Privacy. Consider:

use v5.14;

package PA {
    use Moose;
    my $var='private?';
    1;

    sub getVar {
        return $var;
    }
}

package PB {
    use Moose;
    use MooseX::Privacy;

    has 'var' => (
        is => 'rw',
        isa => 'Str',
        default   => 'private?',
        traits => [qw/Private/],
    );
    1;

    sub getVar {
        my $self = shift;
        return $self->var;
    }
}

my $o1= PA->new();
my $o2= PB->new();

say $o1->getVar();
say $o2->getVar();

In both class PA and PB I have a private variable var. Only in class PB I use MooseX::Privacy. What is the difference between these two approaches? And why should I use MooseX::Privacy?

share|improve this question
2  
No initialization from constructor arguments, no type checking, no coercion, no inheritance, no composing, no introspection, no ability to add traits, ... –  ikegami Apr 9 at 19:53
    
PA's $var is static, PB's isn't. Besides that, is PA even using Moose in the first place? If you don't understand the advantages of Moose, the whole question is moot. –  rutter Apr 9 at 20:08
    
@ikegami I am only talking about private variables, so I would not use a constructor initialization on these anyway? –  Håkon Hægland Apr 9 at 20:08
    
@rutter I did not include public variables in PA in order to make the example minimal.. –  Håkon Hægland Apr 9 at 20:10
    
Not sure. I don't have Moose handy to test. The list was more to give an idea than anything else. Your question is basically "What advantages does Moose provide?" –  ikegami Apr 9 at 20:21

1 Answer 1

If you're looking for Java-style method privacy, then MooseX::Privacy is going to be a big disappointment. Here's what happens with Java style method privacy:

/* This file is called Main.java */
public class Main
{
    public class MyParent
    {
        private String message_string ()
        {
            return "Message from %s\n";
        }

        public void print_message ()
        {
            System.out.printf( this.message_string(), "MyParent" );
        }
    }

    public class MyChild extends MyParent
    {
        public String message_string ()
        {
            return "Another message from %s\n";
        }
    }

    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        Main o = new Main();
        o.run();
    }

    public void run ()
    {
        MyParent c = new MyChild();
        c.print_message();
    }
}

You can compile and run this example like this:

$ javac Main.java
$ java Main
Message from MyParent

Note what's happened. The parent class (MyParent) declares message_string() to be a private method. The child class attempts to override the method but is roundly rebuffed - no soup for you child class!

Now let's try the equivalent with Perl and MooseX::Privacy...

# This file is called Main.pl
use v5.14;
use strict;
use warnings;

package MyParent {
    use Moose;
    use MooseX::Privacy;

    private_method message_string => sub {
        my $self = shift;
        return "Message from %s\n";
    };

    sub print_message {
        my $self = shift;
        printf($self->message_string(), __PACKAGE__);
    }
}

package MyChild {
    use Moose; extends qw(MyParent);
    use MooseX::Privacy;

    sub message_string {
        my $self = shift;
        return "Another message from %s\n";
    }
}

my $c = new MyChild();
$c->print_message();

We can run that like this:

$ perl Main.pl
Another message from MyParent

Say, WHA?!?!?! Ain't message_string supposed to be private?! How the hell did MyChild override the method in MyParent?!

The fact of the matter is, MooseX::Privacy doesn't give you anything close to method privacy as implemented in most OO languages. MooseX::Privacy is simply akin to doing this in your method:

die "GO AWAY!!" unless caller eq __PACKAGE__;

Except that MooseX::Privacy adds massive runtime expense to all your method calls.

Really, there's little reason to use MooseX::Privacy. If you want private methods, put them in lexical variables. Like this:

use v5.14;
use strict;
use warnings;

package MyParent {
    use Moose;

    my $message_string = sub {
        my $self = shift;
        return "Message from %s\n";
    };

    sub print_message {
        my $self = shift;
        printf($self->$message_string(), __PACKAGE__);
    }
}

package MyChild {
    use Moose; extends qw(MyParent);

    sub message_string {
        my $self = shift;
        return "Another message from %s\n";
    }
}

my $c = new MyChild();
$c->print_message();

Now run it:

$ perl Main2.pl
Message from MyParent

Hallelujah!! We have a true private method!

OK, so you can have private methods without MooseX::Privacy, and they work better (and faster) than MooseX::Privacy.

But what about private attributes? Well, I have a little module on CPAN that can help you: Lexical::Accessor. This is a little tool that creates an attribute for you, with "inside out" storage (i.e. the attribute value doesn't get stored in the object's blessed hashref), and installs the accessors for it in lexical variables (just like the private $get_message method above).

Anyway, that's my opinion on MooseX::Privacy.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for interesting answer! What would happen if the print_message method was defined in the child class instead of the parent? (Or if it was overridden in the child?) –  Håkon Hægland Apr 9 at 22:55
    
If print_message is defined in MyChild then it can always call a get_message that is also defined in MyChild (no matter what privacy is chosen for get_message). If print_message is defined in MyChild but get_message is a private method defined in MyParent, then in Java (and using my lexical technique), it can't call get_message because it can't even see that get_message exists! With MooseX::Privacy, it can see it, and call it, but doing so will throw an exception. –  tobyink Apr 10 at 13:28

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