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Suppose I have an SQL Server 2005 table, TableX, with 2 indexes on it:

PK_TableX = PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED on FieldA
IX_TableX_FieldB = CLUSTERED on FieldB

I want to switch the PK to be CLUSTERED, and the other index to be NONCLUSTERED.

I have to assume that the database will be in use at the moment I try to change the indexes round - so my primary concern that I want to avoid, is that at some point in the process the PK constraint will not exist on the table. I want to be protected against any risk of duplicate keys being inserted.

i.e. I can't just drop the primary key and recreate it.

This process needs to be done via an SQL script, not via SSMS.

I have an approach which I think will work (I'll post it as a potential answer), but would like to open it up in case I'm missing something or there is another/better way. Plus, it may prove useful for others in the future

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to cluster on the primary key? Is it a GUID or INT? Do a majority of your querys include matching the PK? –  awright18 Feb 20 '10 at 1:23
    
@awright18 - the clustered PK gives better performance, it's actually a compound primary key on 2 int fields that most often queried on –  AdaTheDev Feb 20 '10 at 11:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted

1) Drop the existing clustered index first (IX_TableX_FieldB):

   DROP INDEX TableX.IX_TableX_FieldB

2) Create a (temporary) UNIQUE constraint on the unique fields referenced in the primary key

    ALTER TABLE TableX
    ADD CONSTRAINT UQ_TableX UNIQUE(FieldA)

3) Drop the PRIMARY KEY

    ALTER TABLE TableX
    DROP CONSTRAINT PK_TableX

4) Recreate the PRIMARY KEY as CLUSTERED

   ALTER TABLE TableX
   ADD CONSTRAINT PK_TableX PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED(FieldA)

5) Drop the temporary UNIQUE constraint

   ALTER TABLE TableX
   DROP CONSTRAINT UQ_TableX

6) Add the IX_TableX_FieldB back on as NONCLUSTERED

   CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_TableX_FieldB ON TableX(FieldB)
share|improve this answer
1  
This is the approach I went with in the end, seems like the best way. –  AdaTheDev Feb 22 '10 at 8:21

I know this is old but this will script out all the FK drops, the pk drop, the pk recreate, the FK recreates. Replace MYTABLE with your table name.

   IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.tables WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[FKAgainstTableList]'))
BEGIN 
    DROP TABLE FKAgainstTableList
END
--CREATE TABLE FKAgainstTableList (ForeignKey VARCHAR(30),[Table] VARCHAR(30))
DECLARE @PKTableName VARCHAR(100), 
        @PKName varchar(100),
        @FKName varchar(100),
        @sql varchar(max),
        @PKcolumnName varchar(30),
        @table VARCHAR(100),
        @FKColumnName VARCHAR(100), 
        @parentColumnNumber int
SET @PKTableName = 'MYTABLE'
set @PKName = (SELECT name FROM sys.indexes WHERE OBJECT_NAME(object_id) = @PKTableName AND is_primary_key = 1)
set @PKcolumnName = (SELECT name FROM sys.columns WHERE OBJECT_NAME(object_id) = @PKTableName AND is_identity =1)
PRINT @PKcolumnName

 SELECT  OBJECT_NAME(sys.foreign_key_columns.parent_object_id) [Table],sys.columns.name [FKColumnName],sys.foreign_keys.name [FKName] 
    INTO FKAgainstTableList
    FROM sys.foreign_keys INNER JOIN sys.foreign_key_columns 
    ON sys.foreign_keys.object_id = sys.foreign_key_columns.constraint_object_id
    INNER JOIN sys.columns ON sys.columns.object_id = sys.foreign_keys.parent_object_id AND sys.columns.column_id = sys.foreign_key_columns.parent_column_id
    WHERE OBJECT_NAME(sys.foreign_keys.referenced_object_id) = @PKTableName


DECLARE table_cur1 CURSOR  FOR
    SELECT  * FROM FKAgainstTableList

    PRINT @sql

-------------------------------Disable constraint on FK Tables
OPEN table_cur1
FETCH NEXT FROM table_cur1 INTO @table,@FKColumnName,@FKName
WHILE   @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN
        SET @sql ='ALTER TABLE '+@table+' DROP CONSTRAINT '+ @FKName
        PRINT @sql
        FETCH NEXT FROM table_cur1 INTO @table,@FKColumnName,@FKName
    END
CLOSE table_cur1
DEALLOCATE table_cur1
--------------------------------DROP AND recreate CLUSTERED pk
IF  EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM sys.indexes WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(@PKTableName) AND name = @PKName)
BEGIN
    SET @sql = 'ALTER TABLE '+@PKTableName+' DROP CONSTRAINT '+ @PKName
    PRINT @sql

END
SET @sql = 'ALTER TABLE '+@PKTableName +' ADD  CONSTRAINT '+@PKName+' PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ('+@PKcolumnName+' ASC)
WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON, FILLFACTOR = 80) ON [PRIMARY]'
PRINT(@sql)

--------------------------------Enable FK constraints on FK tables.
DECLARE table_cur2 CURSOR  FOR
    SELECT  * FROM FKAgainstTableList
OPEN table_cur2
FETCH NEXT FROM table_cur2 INTO @table,@FKColumnName,@FKName
WHILE   @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN
        SET @sql = 'ALTER TABLE '+@table+' WITH NOCHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT  '+ @FKName+' FOREIGN KEY(['+@FKColumnName+'])
        REFERENCES ['+@PKTableName+'] (['+@PKcolumnName+'])'
        PRINT(@sql)
        SET @sql = 'ALTER TABLE '+@table+' CHECK CONSTRAINT  '+@FKName
        PRINT(@sql)

        FETCH NEXT FROM table_cur2 INTO @table,@FKColumnName,@FKName

         END
CLOSE table_cur2
DEALLOCATE table_cur2
DROP TABLE FKAgainstTableList
share|improve this answer
    
The ´set @PKcolumnName´ is not correct, it checks for an identity column and not the primary key column. It will work of course if the primary key column is the identity column. –  TT. Feb 13 at 9:53
    
If you are sure there is only one primary key column, change the set @PKColumnName by SELECT @PKcolumnName=column_name FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(OBJECT_ID(constraint_name), 'IsPrimaryKey') = 1 AND table_name = @PKTableName –  TT. Feb 13 at 10:04
    
Also note that a FILLFACTOR=80 for the PK index is often not optimal. It all depends on the table of course. In my case I ommitted the FILLFACTOR to have the default (100%). –  TT. Feb 13 at 10:17

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