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I have a django site with a large customer base. I would like to give our customer service department the ability to alter normal user accounts, doing things like changing passwords, email addresses, etc. However, if I grant someone the built-in auth | user | Can change user permission, they gain the ability to set the is_superuser flag on any account, including their own. (!!!)

What's the best way to remove this option for non-superuser staff? I'm sure it involves subclassing django.contrib.auth.forms.UserChangeForm and hooking it into my already-custom UserAdmin object... somehow. But I can't find any documentation on how to do this, and I don't yet understand the internals well enough.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

they gain the ability to set the is_superuser flag on any account, including their own. (!!!)

Not only this, they also gain the ability to give themselves any permissions one-by-one, same effect...

I'm sure it involves subclassing django.contrib.auth.forms.UserChangeForm

Well, not necessarily. The form you see in the change page of django's admin is dynamically created by the admin application, and based on UserChangeForm, but this class barely adds regex validation to the username field.

and hooking it into my already-custom UserAdmin object...

A custom UserAdmin is the way to go here. Basically, you want to change the fieldsets property to something like that :

class MyUserAdmin(UserAdmin):
    fieldsets = (
        (None, {'fields': ('username', 'password')}),
        (_('Personal info'), {'fields': ('first_name', 'last_name', 'email')}),
        # Removing the permission part
        # (_('Permissions'), {'fields': ('is_staff', 'is_active', 'is_superuser', 'user_permissions')}),
        (_('Important dates'), {'fields': ('last_login', 'date_joined')}),
        # Keeping the group parts? Ok, but they shouldn't be able to define
        # their own groups, up to you...
        (_('Groups'), {'fields': ('groups',)}),
    )

But the problem here is that this restriction will apply to all users. If this is not what you want, you could for example override change_view to behave differently depending on the permission of the users. Code snippet :

class MyUserAdmin(UserAdmin):
    staff_fieldsets = (
        (None, {'fields': ('username', 'password')}),
        (_('Personal info'), {'fields': ('first_name', 'last_name', 'email')}),
        # No permissions
        (_('Important dates'), {'fields': ('last_login', 'date_joined')}),
        (_('Groups'), {'fields': ('groups',)}),
    )

    def change_view(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        # for non-superuser
        if not request.user.is_superuser:
            try:
                self.fieldsets = self.staff_fieldsets
                response = UserAdmin.change_view(self, request, *args, **kwargs)
            finally:
                # Reset fieldsets to its original value
                self.fieldsets = UserAdmin.fieldsets
            return response
        else:
            return UserAdmin.change_view(self, request, *args, **kwargs)
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That did the trick. Thanks for such a thorough answer! –  David Eyk Feb 19 '10 at 20:01
    
Since I'm using Groups to manage permissions, I also removed the Groups section from staff_fieldsets. –  David Eyk Feb 19 '10 at 20:02
    
Thanks! This helped me a lot! However, Django 1.1.2 didn't seem to like the '_' you had before Personal info and the rest. –  Tyug Oct 22 '10 at 18:09
1  
@Tyug : the _ is the usual import alias for ugettext / ugettext_lazy, as you can see in code examples on docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.1/topics/i18n/internationalization : from django.utils.translation import ugettext as _ –  Clément Oct 23 '10 at 9:30
2  
The non-superuser is still able to change a superusers' password and log in with her account. To disallow this, I removed the password field as well from the staff_fieldsets, wrote a wrapper around UserAdmin.user_change_password that disallows changing the password of superusers for non-superusers, and finally added a link to "password/" in the first fieldsets' description. –  jensq Jun 7 '11 at 13:40

Full code for django 1.1 (limited to basic user information for staff (not superusers))

from django.contrib.auth.models import User
from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _


class MyUserAdmin(UserAdmin):
   my_fieldsets = (
       (None, {'fields': ('username', 'password')}),
       (_('Personal info'), {'fields': ('first_name', 'last_name', 'email')}),
   )

   def change_view(self, request, object_id, extra_context=None):
       # for non-superuser
       print 'test'
       if not request.user.is_superuser:
           self.fieldsets = self.my_fieldsets
           response = UserAdmin.change_view(self, request, object_id,
extra_context=None)
           return response
       else:
           return UserAdmin.change_view(self, request, object_id,
extra_context=None)


admin.site.unregister(User)
admin.site.register(User, MyUserAdmin)
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