Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When would you consider using one over the other and why?

share|improve this question
7  
"I normally go for HTTP_HOST, so that the user stays on the exact host name they started on. For example if I have the same site on a .com and .org domain, I don't want to send someone from .org to .com, particularly if they might have login tokens on .org that they'd lose if sent to the other domain." - This and some other interesting points from stackoverflow.com/questions/1459739/… –  Yarin Oct 31 '11 at 21:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 403 down vote accepted

The HTTP_HOST is obtained from the HTTP request header and this is what the client actually used as "target host" of the request. The SERVER_NAME is defined in server config. Which one to use depends on what you need it for. You should now however realize that the one is a client-controlled value which may thus not be reliable for use in business logic and the other is a server-controlled value which is more reliable. You however need to ensure that the webserver in question has the SERVER_NAME correctly configured. Taking Apache HTTPD as an example, here's an extract from its documentation:

If no ServerName is specified, then the server attempts to deduce the hostname by performing a reverse lookup on the IP address. If no port is specified in the ServerName, then the server will use the port from the incoming request. For optimal reliability and predictability, you should specify an explicit hostname and port using the ServerName directive.

Update: after checking the answer of Pekka on your question which contains a link to bobince's answer that PHP would always return HTTP_HOST's value for SERVER_NAME, which goes against my own PHP 4.x + Apache HTTPD 1.x experiences from a couple of years ago, I blew some dust from my current XAMPP environment on Windows XP (Apache HTTPD 2.2.1 with PHP 5.2.8), started it, created a PHP page which prints the both values, created a Java test application using URLConnection to modify the Host header and tests taught me that this is indeed (incorrectly) the case.

After first suspecting PHP and digging in some PHP bug reports regarding the subject, I learned that the root of the problem is in web server used, that it incorrectly returned HTTP Host header when SERVER_NAME was requested. So I dug into Apache HTTPD bug reports using various keywords regarding the subject, but I can't seem to find one.

Aren't we supposed to file a bug report for HTTPD regarding this subject? It look like that nobody has done it before although it was suggested several times in the related PHP bug reports.

Update 2: I think more and more that the bug is actually in the phpX_module specific for Apache HTTPD on Windows, because it seems to work as documented when used in Linux. I only don't know where to find the dev, docu and bug site for the loose PHP modules?

Update 3: I finally found a related bug at Apache HTTPD bug database. This behaviour was introduced since around Apache HTTPD 1.3. You need to set UseCanonicalName directive to on in the <VirtualHost> entry in httpd.conf (also check the warning at the bottom of the document!).

<VirtualHost *>
    ServerName example.com
    UseCanonicalName on
</VirtualHost> 

This worked for me.

Summarized, SERVER_NAME is more reliable, but you're dependent on the server config!

share|improve this answer
72  
+1 wow, what a piece of work. –  Pekka 웃 Feb 20 '10 at 22:09
    
Okay, this solves my problem, which is unrelated to the OP but relevant. I was very concerned about security issues by using anything that a browser could supply. This answer was a HUGE help. Thank you for taking the time to put it together. –  Doctor Evil Mar 5 '13 at 5:08
    
Why do you say HTTP_HOST is not reliable? Yes it is supplied by the user, but if the user give some bogus value, your server config would automatically return 503 and your PHP script wouldn't even be run! –  Pacerier Jul 14 '13 at 15:01
    
@Pacerier: at the time of writing this answer, it did not. Versions are mentioned in the answer. I don't keep up with PHP anymore, so I can't say if it has indeed changed in a newer version. –  BalusC Jul 14 '13 at 15:03
1  
An easy way to trick Apache from WinXP is to add a line to 'hosts' file stating that the IP of the server is assigned to another domain, like this: "127.0.0.1 mydomain.com". I've used this a lot of times to show a local website tricking my audience to think I've got internet connection and site loaded really fast. You could go the other way, and trick Apache to think it's running locally, with "173.194.41.5 localhost", so you should never trust SERVER_NAME fully unless you are sure your Apache is well configured. –  vicenteherrera Oct 8 '13 at 8:19

HTTP_HOST is the target host sent by the client. It can be manipulated freely by the user. It's no problem to send a request to your site asking for a HTTP_HOST value of www.stackoverflow.com.

SERVER_NAME comes from the server's VirtualHost definition and is therefore considered more reliable. It can, however, also be manipulated from outside under certain conditions related to how your web server is set up: See this This SO question that deals with the security aspects of both variations.

You shouldn't rely on either to be safe. That said, what to use really depends on what you want to do. If you want to determine which domain your script is running on, you can safely use HTTP_HOST as long as invalid values coming from a malicious user can't break anything.

share|improve this answer
3  
Yes but a request asking for a HTTP_HOST value of www.stackoverflow.com would be rejected by most HTTP servers up front so the PHP script wouldn't even see the request! –  Pacerier Jul 14 '13 at 15:04
    
@Pacerier true, but not always if the server is not properly configured. –  Pekka 웃 Jul 14 '13 at 15:18
    
As mentioned in BalusC's post, when you access an Apache virtualhost by IP, both of these variables contain the IP (by default), not the actual server name. You have to use UseCanonicalName on in httpd.conf to force SERVER_NAME to be the actual server name. –  Simon Aug 20 '13 at 0:17

As I mentioned in this answer, if the server runs on a port other than 80 (as might be common on a development/intranet machine) then HTTP_HOST contains the port, while SERVER_NAME does not.

$_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] == 'localhost:8080'
$_SERVER['SERVER_NAME'] == 'localhost'

(At least that's what I've noticed in Apache port-based virtualhosts)

Noted that HTTP_HOST does not contain :443 when running on HTTPS (unless you're running on a non-standard port, which I haven't tested).

share|improve this answer

Please note that if you want to use IPv6, you probably want to use HTTP_HOST rather than SERVER_NAME . If you enter http://[::1]/ the environment variables will be the following:

HTTP_HOST = [::1]
SERVER_NAME = ::1

This means, that if you do a mod_rewrite for example, you might get a nasty result. Example for a SSL redirect:

# SERVER_NAME will NOT work - Redirection to https://::1/
RewriteRule .* https://%{SERVER_NAME}/

# HTTP_HOST will work - Redirection to https://[::1]/
RewriteRule .* https://%{HTTP_HOST}/

This applies ONLY if you access the server without an hostname.

share|improve this answer

Depends what I want to find out. SERVER_NAME is the host name of the server, whilst HTTP_HOST is the virtual host that the client connected to.

share|improve this answer
    
Not exactly true Rowland, SERVER_NAME is usually the name of the VirtualHost, not the server itself. And in Apache, SERVER_NAME is often populated with the same value as HTTP_HOST (see BalusC's answer). –  Simon Aug 20 '13 at 0:24

if you want to check through a server.php or what ever you want to call it with the following:

<?php

phpinfo(INFO_VARIABLES);

?>

or

<?php

header("Content-type: text/plain");

print_r($_SERVER);

?>

Then access it with all the valid urls for your site and check out the difference.

share|improve this answer

It took me a while to understand what people meant by SERVER_NAME is more reliable. I use a shared server and does not have access to virtual host directives. So, I use mod_rewrite in .htaccess to map different HTTP_HOSTs to different directories. In that case, it is HTTP_HOST that is meaningful. The situation is similar if one uses name-based virtual hosts : the server_name directive within a virtual host simply says which HTTP_HOST will be mapped to this virtual host. The bottom line is that, in both cases, the "server name" provided by the client, which is actually called HTTP_HOST, must be matched with a name within the server, which is itself mapped to a directory. Whether the mapping is done with virtual host directives or with htaccess mod_rewrite rules is secondary here. In both cases, the HTTP_HOST must be the SERVER_NAME. I am glad that Apache is configured that way. However, the situation is different with IP-based virtual hosts. In this case and only in this case, SERVER_NAME and HTTP_HOST can be different, because now the client selects the server by the IP, not by the name. Indeed, there might be special configurations where this is important. So, starting from now, I will use SERVER_NAME, just in case my code is ported in these special configurations.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.