Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Instead of setting up a loop to go through each position of this array and set it equal to this dot

int arraySize=50;
char board[arraySize];

     for(i=0; i<arraySize; i++)
          board[i]='.';

Is there any way I can declare an array to be filled with these '.' right away?

e.g. char board[arraySize]={'.'};

share|improve this question
1  
Read man memset –  photoionized Apr 9 at 21:31
1  
char board[arraysize]; is illegal in standard C++ ; see Phillip Ngan's suggestion for a better idea. –  Matt McNabb Apr 9 at 21:49
    
The issue with that declaration is that you allocate memory at compile time using a size that is known only at run time. arraySize may change at anytime. If you say for example '#define ARRAY_SIZE 50' and then in the next you say 'char board[ARRAY_SIZE];' then that is fine since everything is known at compile time. Another option you allocate at runtime using new and use "value initialization" like this: 'char * board = new char[arraySize]();' This will allocate AND initialize the array for you at runtime. –  hebbo May 14 at 22:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of an array, you could construct a vector in this way:

vector<char> board(arraySize, '.');

Vectors can then be used like an array:

char c = board[1];
share|improve this answer

As far as i know, the only way to achieve that would be to actually do what you posted char board[arraySize]={'.', '.','.'......(50 times)}, but actually copy and paste that '.' 50 times, which is a hassle and not smart. So the for loop works, or using vectors!

share|improve this answer

An option you have is to use std::vector, and specify the initial "fill" value in the proper constructor overload:

#include <vector> // For std::vector
....
std::vector<char> board(arraySize, '.');

If you really need a raw C array, you can always use std::fill() to simply fill it with some value:

#include <algorithm> // For std::fill
#include <iterator>  // For non-member std::begin and std::end 
....
static const int arraySize = 50;
char board[arraySize];
fill(begin(board), end(board), '.');

Another option is to use std::array (which is lightweight and zero-overhead like a raw C array, but offers a C++ STL interface too):

#include <algorithm> // For std::fill
#include <array>     // For std::array
....

static const int arraySize = 50;
std::array<char, arraySize> board;
std::fill(board.begin(), board.end(), '.');

// or just:
// board.fill('.');
// Since std::array has a fill() method.

(Frankly, in C++, I think that if you really need to use a statically-sized fixed-size array, std::array is better than raw C arrays.)

share|improve this answer

The issue with that declaration is that you allocate memory at compile time using a size that is known only at run time. arraySize may change at anytime. If you say for example:

#define ARRAY_SIZE 50
char board[ARRAY_SIZE];

This way the size to be allocate is known at compile time and the compiler wont complain. Then you can initialize using: memset(array, '.', size_of_array);

Another option you allocate at runtime using new and use "value initialization" like this:

char * board = new char[arraySize]();

This will allocate AND initialize the array for you at runtime.

share|improve this answer

std::vector is a C++ way to deal with array which size can be changed at run time:

std::vector<char> v( 50, '.'); // a vector with 50 dots

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/vector

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.