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Can anyone tell me if the two models below (top one taken from the UML Superstructure Specification) are semantically equivalent? Fork & Join versus entering parent state

I'm looking to add Fork and Join pseudo state kinds to my state machine library and this appears to be a useful way for me to implement.

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2 Answers 2

These two diagrams are not equivalent.

Replacing the fork by two initials is no problem: in the upper state machine, A1 and B1 get active simultaneously, so do the in the lower one.

However, replacing the Join by two final states is problematic. In the upper case, (Process, A2, B2) is the last state configuration before Cleanup gets active. In every run, before Cleanup is active, Process, A2 and B2 are active. In the lower case, it is (Process, final, final) that has to be active.

In other words, (Process, A2, B2) and (Cleanup) are "neighbor" state configurations in the upper case, but they are not in the lower case. There is (Process, final, final) in between.

"Semantically equivalent" depends on what you define as semantically relevant. For me, it is makes a difference whether Cleanup is the next step after (Process, A2, B2) or it is the next next step.

MOREOVER

in the upper case A2 and B2 have to be simultaneously active, before Process is left. In the lower case, there is no such need. A trace may be ... (Process, final, B1), (Process, final B2), (Process, final, final), then Process is left.

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My question should have read semantic equivalence... I'm a little intrigued re. the 'more possibilities' for exiting Process in the lower diagram; to exit Process, surely both the regions need to be in a final state before the completion transition to Cleanup can be traversed? –  Mesmo Apr 10 '14 at 7:40
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@DMM You are right. I edited my answer –  gefei Apr 10 '14 at 9:20
    
Thanks gefi - understood (and I now have a plan that'll work and preserve Process (A2, B2) as the last state...) –  Mesmo Apr 10 '14 at 14:21
    
@DMM Moreover, in the upper case A2 and B2 have to be simultaneously active, before Process is left. In the lower case, there is no such need. A trace may be ... (Process, final, B1), (Process, final B2), (Process, final, final), then Process is left. –  gefei Apr 10 '14 at 15:00

The initial and final states in the lower diagram don't exist in the upper. They imply additional behavior before the A1/B1 states and after the A2/B2 states that the upper diagram doesn't have, so no, they are not equivalent diagrams. The top diagram implies that the SETUP state or the transition event is responsible for the fork and the creation of 2 processes, A and B. The bottom diagram implies that the PROCESS is responsible for creating the 2 processes.

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As neither pseudo states or final states can have entry or exit behavior where would the 'additional behavior' be coming from? –  Mesmo Apr 10 '14 at 7:35
    
Good question. To me, they imply creation and deletion. –  Bruce Apr 10 '14 at 10:37

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