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What is the proper indentation for a bash script? As a java/c++ monkey I religiously indent my code. But it seems you are not allowed to indent this code:

#! /bin/bash

if [ $# = 0 ]
then
        # there was no arguments => just do to standard output.
        echo "there are no parameters"
else
cat << EOF
==========================================================
==========================================================
==========================================================
==========================================================
DESCRIPTION:

$1
----------------------------------------------------------

EOF
fi

When indented it does not recognize the EOF and if you just unindented the EOF (confusing) it prints indented.

Q: What is the proper indenting for bash scripts?

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Most programming languages that feature HEREDOCs have issues indenting them. This isn't really specific to bash. –  Ryan Thompson Aug 25 '10 at 2:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

With bash (3.2 at least) and ksh (do not know about others) you can indent the here-documents using <<-, and the leading tabs will be stripped (not spaces, only tabs), e.g.

if [...]; then
    cat <<-EOF
        some text
    EOF
fi
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2  
Another things that's useful to know is that quoting the beginning delimiter prevents expansion (parameter, command substitution, etc.) of the here-document: foo << "EOF" and they can be combined: foo <<- "EOF". The latter is useful for commenting out blocks of code (you can use the no-op : as the receiving command or omit it). Also, when using <<- you have a choice of whether you want to indent the closing delimiter (or any line, really). –  Dennis Williamson Feb 19 '10 at 17:11
    
See my comment on the other answer, you can't indent the end marker of the here document. –  haridsv Feb 24 '14 at 17:15
    
works in dash as well. –  törzsmókus Jan 7 at 0:51

yes you can "indent", by using <<- (see bash man page on here documents)

if [ $# = 0 ]
then
        # there was no arguments => just do to standard output.
        echo "there are no parameters"
else
    cat <<-EOF
    ==========================================================
    ==========================================================
    ==========================================================
    ==========================================================
    DESCRIPTION:

    $1
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    EOF
fi
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+1. I didn't know that feature! –  mouviciel Feb 19 '10 at 16:16
    
This is slightly incorrect, the end marker of the here document still can't be indented. In fact this is my biggest gripe about the here documents, that they only strip leading tabs (I would like 2 spaces as indentation), and that you still can't indent the final marker. –  haridsv Feb 24 '14 at 17:14
1  
@haridsv actually you can indent the final marker in GNU bash 4.3.11 and dash 0.5.7 –  törzsmókus Jan 7 at 0:56
    
Thanks @törzsmókus, didn't know about this enhancement. –  haridsv Jan 7 at 5:33

This is not a bash indenting problem, this is a here-file problem. The label that you specify after <<, i.e., EOF, must appear alone in a line, without leading or trailing whitespaces.

For the here-file itself, it is used as typed, indentation included.

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there is a solution (<<-), see other answers –  törzsmókus Jan 7 at 0:58

Mouviciel is correct.

You can put the here-file text in a separate file if you want to preserve indentation. You would then have to handle the substitution yourself, however.

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