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I tried to set up username and password for Neo4j instance running on linux machine. I couldn't find any documentation.Please let me know how to do this.

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The username used on install as a service by default is neo4j, group is also neo4j.

I think you can configure the used user in conf/neo4j-wrapper.conf

# Name of the service
wrapper.name=neo4j

# User account to be used for linux installs. Will default to current
# user if not set.
wrapper.user=

You change the password for an user on Linux with passwd, see man passwd for details.

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I am not running Neoj as a service in opensuse (linux machine). I just set it up and running it normally. In my case, I would I set an user name and password.Please let me know. – user4654 Apr 10 '14 at 16:29
    
If you run it in your normal user account you don't have to set a username/password. – Michael Hunger Apr 12 '14 at 9:22
    
If I can't do it, how can I stop from every one from accessing the database. – user4654 Apr 12 '14 at 20:43

Neo4j doesn't have the support for using a username and password for accessing the database (as you would do with MySQL for instance). So you have to rely on other security mechanisms, like for instance the security groups in AWS, or a firewall. You may want to check the documentation and the other stackoverflow questions on this matter:

  1. http://docs.neo4j.org/chunked/stable/security-server.html#_server_authorization_rules
  2. How to secure access to neo4j remote shell?
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This answer is now out of date. Since Neo4j 2.2 there is support for a username and password – John Deverall Oct 9 '15 at 16:04

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