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i have the following code:

while getopts ":vh" opt; do
        case $opt in
         (h)
                helpMe
                exit 0
         ;;
         (v)
                version1
                exit 0
         ;;
         \?)
                echo -e "Invalid option: -$OPTARG\ntype -h for more help.\n" >&2
                exit 1
        ;;
        esac
done

this code should get flags 'h' and 'v' only. but when i give flag for example 'hg' i still get the help output. also, when i give flag "va" i still get the version output. What i trying to say is that my script is ignore all the letter after the required one.

Why it happens? Can someone please advise?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
AFAIK opt only handles flags (single letters). So hg is help and g which is unknown. So IMHO you program is acting correctly according to opt. Your expection is just different. What should it do when you give it hg? Abort? – RedX Apr 10 '14 at 9:23
    
no.get the help output – Assaf baruch Apr 10 '14 at 9:27
    
I just believe your syntax is wrong. Instead of (h) try just h). – RedX Apr 10 '14 at 11:03
    
@RedX, bash actually allows for both forms though it's rare to see (x) in the wild - see the bash manpage, specifically the bit before the pattern: case word in [ [(] pattern [ | pattern ] ... ) list ;; ] ... esac. – paxdiablo Apr 10 '14 at 11:10

Options are parsed and handled one at a time by the loop and -hg is treated as two individual options, -h and -g. Since the loop encounters -h first it triggers helpMe and exits without ever parsing -g. If you were to run your script with -gh you would see that it fails when it hits the -g option since it comes first in this case.

If you don't like this behaviour you can use a variable to store the state, let getopts finish parsing and test for -h afterwards:

while getopts ":vh" opt; do
    case $opt in
        h)
            opt_h=true
            ;;
        [...]
    esac
done

if [ "${opt_h}" = true ]; then
    helpMe
    exit 0
fi
share|improve this answer
    
that's right. but dose it say that there is no solution for this? i want to use ONLY 'h' and 'v' – Assaf baruch Apr 10 '14 at 9:29
    
@Assafbaruch I don't understand your question, can you rephrase? – Adrian Frühwirth Apr 10 '14 at 9:30

It's the calls to exit in both your choices. getopts will process the arguments one at a time so, when it strikes the h in -h -g (the expansion of -hg), it runs helpMe and then exits.

That means it will never find the -g in the options.

The simplest way to handle this is to simply state that, on -h, it will output the help text and exit, regardless of whatever other parameters there are.

If you want to ensure the arguments are valid, simply store their state in the option checking code and process them later.

That way, the checks will be done before any actions. Something like this:

flag_v=0
flag_h=0
while getopts ":vh" opt; do
        case $opt in
         (h)
                flag_h=1
         ;;
         (v)
                flag_v=1
         ;;
         \?)
                echo -e "Invalid option: -$OPTARG\ntype -h for more help.\n" >&2
                exit 1
        ;;
        esac
done

if [[ $flag_h -eq 1 ]] ; then
    helpMe
    exit 0
fi
if [[ $flag_v -eq 1 ]] ; then
    showVersion
    exit 0
fi

# Now continue, neither h nor v was specified.

That will give help and exit if you specify -h or -hv, version information and exit if you specify -v, and exit with an error if you provide any other option.

If you specify no options, it will simply carry on beyond the comment to do whatever it is your script is meant to do.

share|improve this answer
    
Your initial answer stated exactly what mine did and every edit of yours is based on my prior edit. Looking at your reputation, I am a bit baffled. – Adrian Frühwirth Apr 10 '14 at 9:38
1  
@Adrian, that can often happen. I'm not looking at your answer specifically (or anyone else's in general) but I do answer then take some time to reflect to see if it can be improved upon. The fact that there's only one minute between our initial answers means that we just think alike. The edit I made was to clarify my earlier answer on one way to fix it. – paxdiablo Apr 10 '14 at 10:00

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