Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Unfortunately I cannot provide any code examples, however I will try and create an example. My question is about Objects and memory allocation in PHP.

If I have an object, lets say:

$object = new Class();

Then I do something like

$object2 = $object;

What is this actualy doing? I know there is a clone function, but thats not what I'm asking about, I'm concerned about whether this is creating another identical object, or if its just assigning a reference to $object.

I strongly understand this to mean that it just creates a reference, but in some case usages of mine, I find that I get another $object created, and I can't understand why.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you use the magic method __invoke, you can call an object similar to a function, and it will call that magic method.

class Object{
    function __invoke(){ return "hi"; }
}

$object = new Object;
$object2 = $object();
echo $object2; // echos hi

That means that $object2 is equal to whatever that function returns.

Basically, you are calling a function, but using a variable as it's name. So:

function test(){ echo "hi"; }
$function_name = "test";
$function_name(); // echos hi.

In this case, you are just calling an object instead.

So, in reference to your question, this is actually not 'cloning' at all, unless the __invoke() function looks like this:

function __invoke(){ return this }

In which case, it would be a reference to the same class.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry. I do not understand the relevance? Can you explain. –  Layke Feb 19 '10 at 17:55
2  
@Laykes, your code has a parentheses around the assignment, so Chacha102 assumed you were asking how to use the invoke handler in PHP. –  Jon Benedicto Feb 19 '10 at 18:02
    
I updated my answer to provide how this might be used for reference assignment. –  Tyler Carter Feb 19 '10 at 18:05
    
Thanks for your answer. –  Layke Feb 19 '10 at 18:07
add comment

You are creating a second reference of the same object. Here is a proof:

<?php
class TestClass {
    private $number;

    function __construct($num) { $this->number = $num; }
    function increment() { $this->number++; }

    function __toString() { return (string) $this->number; }
}

$original = new TestClass(10);

echo "Testing =\n";
echo "--------------------------------\n";
echo '$equal = $original;' . "\n";
$equal = $original;

echo '$equal = ' . $equal . ";\n";

echo '$original->increment();' . "\n";
$original->increment();

echo '$equal = ' . $equal . ";\n";

echo "\n";
echo "Testing clone\n";
echo "--------------------------------\n";
echo '$clone = clone $original;' . "\n";
$clone = clone $original;

echo '$clone = ' . $clone . ";\n";

echo '$original->increment();' . "\n";
$original->increment();

echo '$clone = ' . $clone . ";\n";

Use clone if you want to create a copy of an instance.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, you didn't exactly answer the question, which was: What is $object2 = $object() doing. In fact, none of you did. –  Tyler Carter Feb 19 '10 at 18:17
    
Also, I didn't down vote until after I got the accepted answer, as I wanted to make sure he didn't mistype the $object(). But it turns out that he didn't. And none of you actually addressed that. –  Tyler Carter Feb 19 '10 at 18:23
    
So, I'd like to say that your comment insinuating me for stratgetically downvoting is insulting and completely false. –  Tyler Carter Feb 19 '10 at 18:25
    
@Chacha102: I wasn't necessarily aiming at you. I miss read the question. With all that talk of clone and references, it was hard to miss the (). –  Andrew Moore Feb 19 '10 at 19:24
    
It was my mistake. –  Layke Feb 19 '10 at 20:44
add comment

Assuming that you mean

$object2 = $object;

And not

$object2 = $object(); 

PHP will create a reference to the original object, it will not copy it. See http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.basic.php, the section called Object Assignment.

share|improve this answer
    
I did mean the first, but the first poster answered another question I have had in the past. Thanks. –  Layke Feb 19 '10 at 19:00
add comment
<?php

class Object{
    public $value = 1;

    public function inc(){
        $this->value++;
    }
}

$object = new Object;
$object2 = $object;

$object->inc();

echo $object2->value; // echos 2, proving it's by reference
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.