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Online references have rather brief and vague descriptions on the purpose of std::iostream::sentry. When should I concern myself with this little critter? If it's only intended to be used internally, why make it public?

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Since when is an identifier a critter? And it is certainly not little! :D –  Hogan Feb 19 '10 at 18:21
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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Most people will never write any code that needs to deal with creating sentry objects. A sentry object is needed when/if you extract data from (or insert it into) the stream buffer that underlies the stream object itself.

As long as your insertion/extraction operator uses other iostream members/operators to do its work, it does not have to deal with creating a sentry object (because those other iostream operators will create and destroy sentry objects as needed).

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Ah, thanks. This makes the most sense to me (especially the underlying stream buffer thing). I was puzzled over why the textbook examples showing how to write your own custom stream operators never mentioned sentry objects. –  Emile Cormier Feb 19 '10 at 20:35
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It's used whenever you need to extract or output data with a stream. That is, whenever you make an operator>>, the extraction operator, or operator<<, the insertion operator.

It's purpose is to simplify the logic: "Are any fail bits set? Synchronize the buffers. For input streams, optionally get any whitespace out of the way. Okay, ready?"

All extraction stream operators should begin with:

// second parameter to true to not skip whitespace, for input that uses it
const std::istream::sentry ok(stream, icareaboutwhitespace);

if (ok)
{
    // ...
}

And all insertion stream operators should begin with:

const std::ostream::sentry ok(stream); 

if (ok)
{
    // ...
}

It's just a cleaner way of doing (something similar to):

if (stream.good())
{
    if (stream.tie())
        stream.tie()->sync();

    // the second parameter
    if (!noskipwhitespace && stream.flags() & ios_base::skipws)
    {
        stream >> std::ws;            
    }
}

if (stream.good())
{
    // ...
}

ostream just skips the whitespace part.

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If I implement a custom operator>> in terms of other stream member functions, is it still necessary (or a good idea) to use the sentry? –  Emile Cormier Feb 19 '10 at 18:35
    
What about the insertion operator? ostream also defines sentry. –  Emile Cormier Feb 19 '10 at 18:36
    
@GMan: I hear ya. It seems one could write a whole textbook just on iostreams. :-) –  Emile Cormier Feb 19 '10 at 18:54
    
@GMan: at least twice -- there's an old (pre-standard) one by Teal, and a newer (much larger) one by Langer and Kreft that talks about the standardized version. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 19 '10 at 21:26
    
Why did they needed a class for this? Making a method wasn't enough? –  Calmarius Aug 31 '12 at 16:40
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Formatted input for anything but the basic types (int, double, etc.) doesn't make a lot of sense, and arguably only from them when taken from a non-interactive stream such as an istringstream. So you should probably not be implementing op>> in the first place, and thus not have to worry about sentry objects.

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What if I want overload operator>> to conveniently do formatted input on a tuple of basic types? E.g.: struct Point{double x, double y}; Point point; file >> point; The overloaded operator>> is implemented in terms of operator>> for basic types. –  Emile Cormier Feb 19 '10 at 20:29
    
@Emile Assuming point is formatted as "x,y" then its suprisingly difficult to implement op>> so it works correctly for point AND works correctly when used in concert with all other formatted input operators. Basically, you are better off writing functions to parse the specific inputs you are expecting, rather than some generalised scheme which at the end of the day can't handle real world inputs. –  anon Feb 19 '10 at 20:34
    
@Neil: I see what you're saying. But perhaps a legitimate use of a custom operator>> would be to read back data from a file generated by symmetrical operator<<'s. This seems to be the premise behind the Boost.Serialization library. –  Emile Cormier Feb 19 '10 at 20:43
    
@Emile Well serialisation is a different thing. Typically it must output a token before the data - like [POINT]120,70 that can be used to work out what the thing being read back in actually is. Such libraries often misuse (IMHO) operators like op>> when a named function like Read() might be better. I don't know anything about the Boost serialisation library though, and am a bit dubious about serialisation as a concept –  anon Feb 19 '10 at 20:50
    
@Neil: Hmm, no wait, I don't quite understand your argument in your first comment. :-) You're saying that operator>>(istream& s, P& p){s>>p.x; s>>p.y;} is bad, yet getPoint(istream& s, P& p){s>>p.x; s>>p.y;} is ok? –  Emile Cormier Feb 19 '10 at 20:53
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