Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to know what's the general behaviour of an iterator if the underlaying object changes during the iteration.

Using a simple mutable list, it seems obvious: the iterator will try to follow on the next element if any, and send StopIteration if the end is reached.

>>> l = range(10)
>>> a = iter(l)
>>> a.next()
0
>>> a.next()
1
>>> a.next()
2
>>> l[3]='a'
>>> a.next()
'a'
>>> a.next()
4
>>> del l[5]
>>> a.next()
6
>>> a.next()
7
>>> a.next()
8
>>> a.next()
9
>>> a.next()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration

This is self-explanatory so far. What I don't understand is, that if I append a new element, the iterator will still return StopIteration.

>>> l.append(11)
>>> a.next()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration

If I do the same before reaching the end:

>>> l=[1]
>>> a=iter(l)
>>> a.next()
1
>>> l.append(2)
>>> a.next()
2

How is this working under the hood, and what is the expected behaviour of a more complex mutable iterable object? (e.g. think of an object representing a graph, which then can be iterated over, using a traversal algorithm. What is supposed to happen then if nodes are added/removed while iterating?)

share|improve this question
1  
Answer: don't. You ask what is supposed to happen in these conditions, but really you've stumbled across the answer yourself: such behaviour is typically ill-defined. –  dvntehn00bz Apr 10 at 12:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There's a comment on that particular issue in PEP 234 (Iterators):

Once a particular iterator object has raised StopIteration, will it also raise StopIteration on all subsequent next() calls?

Some say that it would be useful to require this, others say that it is useful to leave this open to individual iterators. Note that this may require an additional state bit for some iterator implementations (e.g. function-wrapping iterators).

Resolution: once StopIteration is raised, calling it.next() continues to raise StopIteration.

Note: this was in fact not implemented in Python 2.2; there are many cases where an iterator's next() method can raise StopIteration on one call but not on the next. This has been remedied in Python 2.3.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this like a suggestion or enforced by the language? If I implement an iterator class, do I need to take care that once __next__() returns StopIteration, it doesn't return anything else? –  Mkoch Apr 10 at 13:53
    
No, it's not enforced. You'll have to implement that behaviour yourself. –  Phillip Apr 10 at 14:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.