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I'm writing a C++ program that sends and receives images using Boost.Asio.

When compiling I don't get errors, but when executing and having sent an image the program that receives the image crashes giving the following error message (in Visual Studio 2012, Windows 7 32bit):

Debug Assertion Failed:

Program: […]\DataSender.exe
File: f:\dd\vctools\crt_bld\self_x86\crt\src\dbgdel.cpp
Line: 52

Expression: _BLOCK_TYPE_IS_VALID(pHead->nBlockUse)

I read packages the size of 4096 bytes into a pointer to a char array while there are still incoming bytes to read. In the final looping—if there are less than 4096 bytes to read—I delete the pointer and create a pointer to a char array the size of the remaining bytes. Until here it still works.

But when I try to delete the char pointer array again at the end of the loop (in order to create a new char pointer array with standard size 4096 for the next incoming images), the program crashes.

Here is my code's excerpt in question:

char* buffer = new char[4096];

[…]

int remainingBytes = imageSize;

[…]

// read data
while( remainingBytes > 0 )
{
    boost::system::error_code error;

    // use smaller buffer if remaining bytes don't fill the tcp package
    // fully
    if( remainingBytes < 4096 )
    {
        delete[] buffer; // this one doesn't give an error
        bufferSize = remainingBytes;
        char* buffer = new char[bufferSize];
    }

    // read from socket into buffer
    size_t receivedBytes = socket.read_some(
            boost::asio::buffer(buffer, bufferSize), error);
    remainingBytes -= receivedBytes;

    // count total length
    totalReceivedBytes += receivedBytes;

    // add current buffer to totalBuffer
    for( int i = 0; i < bufferSize; i++)
    {
        totalBuffer.push_back(buffer[i]);
    }

    // if smaller buffer has been used delete it and
    // create usual tcp buffer again
    if( receivedBytes < 4096 )
    {
        delete[] buffer; // here the error occurs
        bufferSize = 4096;
        char* buffer = new char[bufferSize];
    }
}

I ran the same code also on a Debian GNU/Linux 7.2 64bit machine, which returned the following error, at the same position in code:

*** glibc detected *** ./datasender: double free or corruption (!prev): 0x0000000002503970 ***

I assume I'm doing something wrong when deallocating the char pointer array but I haven't figured it out yet.

Can someone point me in the right direction?

Thank you, Julini

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1  
delete[buffer]; now this is curious, don't you want delete [] buffer; instead? (Just asking, I'm a bit confused by your statement). Oh and by the way, the buffer you allocate in the if statement is local to the if scope. You're leaking here. –  JBL Apr 10 '14 at 15:44
    
Use std::vector. 1) It is safer and easier to use and 2) it probably would run faster than the new/delete gymnastics you're doing now. A buffer resize using vector will not go through the hoops of calling new[]/delete[] if the buffer happens to be smaller. –  PaulMcKenzie Apr 10 '14 at 16:09
    
There's really no reason to resize the buffer to make it smaller. Just keep track of how much data was received, and only read out that much. –  Andrew Medico Apr 10 '14 at 18:15
    
@JBL: Oops, that has just been a typo. In the actual code it's delete[] buffer. But thank you, I wasn't aware it makes a difference if I'm declaring something inside or outside of a loop. –  Julini Apr 11 '14 at 10:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're actually deleting twice the buffer when remainingBytes and receivedBytes are less than 4096.

Indeed, you're deleting buffer once, then allocate memory into a local buffer, not the outer one.

Then, when you delete buffer in the second if block, you're deleting a second time the same buffer. The allocation you've made in the if scopes are memory leaks. These aren't the same variables.

When you do

char* buffer = new char[bufferSize];

in your if scopes, you're creating a new variable, not allocating memory into the outer buffer variable. Thus, you're leaking, and not allocating memory into the buffer you just deleted.

Without looking further, you should remove the char* in front of buffer in both if blocks and then continue debugging.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you a lot! Now it's working. I thought there is only a difference between local and global variables inside and outside of functions—but come to think about it, I knew that the iterator of a for-loop is local but it hasn't been that clear to me obviously. –  Julini Apr 11 '14 at 11:37
    
Two things: 1) Think about scopes for variable names visibility. Not only functions, but if-blocks, loops, etc. 2) As many others have pointed out, you should definitely consider using a standard container like std::vector for what you're doing. You'd have spared a lot of memory shenanigans that ended creating this problem. :) –  JBL Apr 11 '14 at 12:31

I would use std::vector instead:

#include <vector>
//...
std::vector<char> buffer(remainingBytes);
bufferSize = remainingBytes;
//...
while( remainingBytes > 0 )
{
    boost::system::error_code error;

    // use smaller buffer if remaining bytes don't fill the tcp package
    // fully
    if( remainingBytes < 4096 )
    {
       buffer.resize(remainingBytes);
       bufferSize = remainingBytes;
    }

    // read from socket into buffer
    size_t receivedBytes = socket.read_some(
            boost::asio::buffer(&buffer[0], bufferSize), error);
    remainingBytes -= receivedBytes;

    // count total length
    totalReceivedBytes += receivedBytes;

    // add current buffer to totalBuffer
    totalBuffer.insert(totalBuffer.end(), buffer.begin(), 
                                          buffer.begin() + receivedBytes);

    // if smaller buffer has been used delete it and
    // create usual tcp buffer again
    if( receivedBytes < 4096 )
    {
        buffer.resize(4096);
        bufferSize = 4096;
    }
}

There will be no memory leaks.

Also, I think your code has a bug in that you are supposed to copy only the number of received bytes (the return value of the read_some() function). Instead you assumed that bufferSize characters were returned.

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