Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a class in C++ that helps me to manipulate a char array. How can I make this the right way?

1 - Create the char array using the provided size

2 - Return the char array in getArray()

class ByteArray {
public:
    ByteArray(int size) {
        array_.resize(size);
    }

    const char* getArray() { return array_; }

private:
    char array_[];
};
share|improve this question
2  
maybe take a look at std::vector –  Alexis Apr 10 '14 at 15:41
    
What do you need the class to do? Can't you just use a container such as std::vector<char> and algorithms? –  juanchopanza Apr 10 '14 at 15:45
1  
@juanchopanza : he probably want's to do it as an exercise. –  Michael Walz Apr 10 '14 at 15:46
    
It is part of a protocol to communicate with other applications in other languages. I'm trying to write a class to manipulate binary data like Actionscript 3 ByteArray, to be easier to other programmers read. It communicates with Adobe Air applications and Node.js applications. Thanks all. –  Formiga Apr 10 '14 at 17:24

3 Answers 3

You can use std::vector;

 class ByteArray {
    public:
        ByteArray(int size) {
            array_.reserve(size);
        }

        const char* getArray() { return array_.data(); }

    private:
        std::vector<char> array_;
    };
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I was looking for. Thanks, worked very well. –  Formiga Apr 10 '14 at 17:19

Something like this probably

class ByteArray {
public:
    ByteArray(int size) {
        delete[] array_;
        array_ = new char[size];
    }

    const char* getArray() { return array_; }

private:
    char *array_;
};

You cannot use an array with no size, instead you can dynamically allocate it.

share|improve this answer
2  
You will need to do something to not leak memory. –  juanchopanza Apr 10 '14 at 15:59
1  
yeah, probably delete the array in the destructor, and put some guard not to delete a null array the first time. –  GeoAoe Apr 10 '14 at 16:08
2  
What's the point of delete in constructor? –  texasbruce Apr 10 '14 at 16:08
    
This is ok, but using vector<char> like Alexis suggested is better to me. Thanks! –  Formiga Apr 10 '14 at 17:20
    
You don't need to guard against deleting a null pointer. But you would have to do something about copy and assignment. –  juanchopanza Apr 10 '14 at 19:03
up vote -1 down vote accepted

This is the most optimal version that I found.

class ByteArray {
public:
    ByteArray(int size) {
        array_ = (char*)malloc(size);
    }

    ~ByteArray() {
        free(array_);
        array_ = NULL;
    }

    const char * getArray() { return array_; }

private:
    char * array_;
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.