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I'm trying to automate a return-to-libc attack based on the exploitation of a buffer overflow vulnerabulity (on a x86-32 linux machine). I need a way to find the address of execve function in libc without using gdb:

(gdb) p execve
$1 = {} 0xf7ec1b30

The ASLR protection is disabled so as to allow this technique.

Is there a way to get the address of a function in libc as execve? With a program or any other automatable way? (no gdb because isn't automatable in a bash script or a C program).

Any advice is welcome.

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1  
void *p = execv ; Now p contains the address of the function unless there is a redirection jump at that address, I don't know for linux. – Michael Walz Apr 10 '14 at 15:54

Is this a trick question or does something like this not work:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int
main (int argc, char **argv)
{
  void *a = execv;
  printf ("execv is at %p\n", a);
  exit (0);
}

Works here.

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This idea don't work for my attack. In this way you get the address of execve in the PLT of your binary, I need the address of the execve in the addresses space where shared library are loaded so I can call the execve function even if in the victim program isn't used. – marcofor10 Apr 10 '14 at 17:00

If you are trying to get this information for a script, perhaps the nm utility would help?

example: nm {libraryPath} | grep execve

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Could you explain your hint a little bit? I need the address of the execve in the addresses space where shared library are loaded in order to call the execve function even if in the victim program isn't used. – marcofor10 Apr 10 '14 at 17:04

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