Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get unique IDs for object instances in PHP 5+.

The function, spl_object_hash() is available from PHP 5.2 but I'm wondering if there is a workaround for older PHP versions.

There are a couple of functions in the comments on php.net but they're not working for me. The first (simplified):

function spl_object_hash($object){
    if (is_object($object)){
        return md5((string)$object);
        }
    return null;
    }

does not work with native objects (such as DOMDocument), and the second:

function spl_object_hash($object){
    if (is_object($object)){
        ob_start();
        var_dump($object);
        $dump = ob_get_contents();
        ob_end_clean();
        if (preg_match('/^object\(([a-z0-9_]+)\)\#(\d)+/i', $dump, $match)) {
            return md5($match[1] . $match[2]);
            }
        }
    return null;
    }

looks like it could be a major performance buster!

Does anybody have anything up their sleeve?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need this ? Maybe the real solution would be for you not to need this -- which might indicate some problem in your design ? –  Pascal MARTIN Feb 19 '10 at 20:55
    
I'm working on a CMS and am building an 'event' system. Events can be triggered using the following code: trigger('evt_name', new Event()). CMS plugins can 'bind' to system events using bind('evt_name', 'callback_function'). What I'd like to do is add another argument to both functions that accepts an instance that event should be bound to, but to store event data (outside of the object itself) I need to convert it to a unique string to use as an array key. What are your thoughts? –  Rowan Feb 19 '10 at 21:02
    
I don't really have an answer on that, but I though knowing more might help (even if not me ^^ ) -- No matter what, though, I've never felt the need to get any kind of "unique ID" for an object ;; maybe you could only store a reference to the object somewhere ? –  Pascal MARTIN Feb 19 '10 at 21:05
    
I could store references to instances but that would require a lot of array iteration every time an event is fired (to check whether each bind is attached to the object the event is triggered on). There are other ways round this, I know, but I'd still like to know if there is a nicer way of emulating spl_object_hash(). –  Rowan Feb 19 '10 at 21:09
    
I don't have a definitive answer as well, but doesn't it boil down to a simple array($obj, $data) where the key is irrelevant? –  VolkerK Feb 19 '10 at 21:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I ran a couple of quick tests. I really think you'd be better off storing real callbacks in your bind() function using bind('evt_name', array($obj, 'callback_function')). If you absolutely want to go the spl_object_hash route, rather than storing references with the event bindings, you're looking at something like this:

A var_dump / extract and hash id implementation:

function spl_object_hash_var_dump($object){
    if (is_object($object)){
        ob_start();
        var_dump($object);
        $dump = ob_get_contents();
        ob_end_clean();
        if (preg_match('/^object\(([a-z0-9_]+)\)\#(\d)+/i', $dump, $match)) {
            return md5($match[1] . $match[2]);
            }
        }
    return null;
}

A naive references implementation:

function spl_object_dumb_references(&$object) {
    static $hashes;

    if (!isset($hashes)) $hashes = array();

    // find existing instance
    foreach ($hashes as $hash => $o) {
        if ($object === $o) return $hash;
    }

    $hash = md5(uniqid());
    while (array_key_exists($hash, $hashes)) {
        $hash = md5(uniqid());
    }

    $hashes[$hash] = $object;
    return $hash;
}

This one was basically 5-50x worse than the class-based reference function across the board, so it's not worth worrying about.

A store references by class implementation:

function spl_object_hash_references(&$object) {
    static $hashes;

    if (!isset($hashes)) $hashes = array();

    $class_name = get_class($object);
    if (!array_key_exists($class_name, $hashes)) {
        $hashes[$class_name] = array();
    }

    // find existing instance
    foreach ($hashes[$class_name] as $hash => $o) {
        if ($object === $o) return $hash;
    }

    $hash = md5(uniqid($class_name));
    while (array_key_exists($hash, $hashes[$class_name])) {
        $hash = md5(uniqid($class_name));
    }

    $hashes[$class_name][$hash] = $object;
    return $hash;
}

And you end up with results that look like this. Summary: the class based references implementation performs best around n/50 classes--at its best, it manages to pull off 1/3 the performance of the var_dump based implementation, and it's usually much worse.

The var_dump implementation seems to be tolerable, though not ideal. But if you're not doing too many of these lookups, it won't be a bottleneck for you. Especially as a fallback for PHP < 5.2 boxen.

share|improve this answer
    
wow thanks, I'd given up on getting an answer! I need to digest your code a bit (later though, I'm at work ;p) but I'll get back to you. The code I'm writing will be part of a distributed system, and I'd like to support php5<5.2 but hopefully most of the time 5.2 will be available. –  Rowan Mar 17 '10 at 10:38

I once wrote a helper function for wordpress that offers one unique hash per object, it works with a counter and stores the hash per as a public class property if it has been assigned to an object. The following example demonstrates this:

/**
 * get object hash
 *
 * Returns a unique hash per object.
 *
 * Proxy function for wordpress installments on servers
 * with a PHP version < 5.2.0.
 *
 * @since 3.0.2
 * @note Become deprecated with version 3.2.0 (PHP 5.2 requirements)
 * @param object $object
 * @return string unique object hash
 */
function wp_object_hash( &$object ) {
    static $prefix, $count = 0, $property = '__wphookobjhash__', $spl_function_exists;

    isset( $spl_function_exists ) || $spl_function_exists = function_exists( 'spl_object_hash' );

    // prefer spl_object_hash if available
    if ( $spl_function_exists )
        return spl_object_hash( $object );

    // validate input
    if ( !is_object( $object ) ) { 
        trigger_error( __FUNCTION__ . '() expects parameter 1 to be object', E_USER_WARNING );
        return null;
    }
    // setup prefix and counter to generate object hash, set it to object if not set
    isset( $prefix ) || ( ( $prefix = uniqid( '' ) ) && $property .= $prefix . '__' );
    isset( $object->$property ) || ( $object->$property = sprintf( '%s-%08d', $prefix , ++$count ) );
    return $object->$property;
}

If you're using a PHP 5 version, you don't need to pass the parameter by reference.

share|improve this answer

This is what you want.

I've fixed a very probable bug and streamlined the function from bobthecow answer (which is also borrowed from php.net) to this:

if ( !function_exists( 'spl_object_hash' ) ) {
    function spl_object_hash( $object )
    {
        ob_start();
        var_dump( $object );
        preg_match( '[#(\d+)]', ob_get_clean(), $match );
        return $match[1];
    }
}

It returns an integer (usually in the sub-100 range), which is unique for any object (see this answer for details on what you're seeing).


P.S. I use this implementation in a real world scenario here

share|improve this answer

Would uniqid() work for your task?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.