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What happens (in detail) when a thread makes a system call by raising interrupt 80? What work does Linux do to the thread's stack and other state? What changes are done to the processor to put it into kernel mode? After running the interrupt handler, how is control restored back to the calling process?

What if the system call can't be completed quickly: e.g. a read from disk. How does the interrupt handler relinquish control so that the processor can do other stuff while data is being loaded and how does it then obtain control again?

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I guess a good exercise would be to check out the source. Maybe start at kernel 0.0.1 and move upwards. –  Tom Feb 19 '10 at 21:21
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There are also a couple of other ways to make system calls these days. You can make a regular function call into a specially mapped memory page. You can use the SYSENTER or SYSCALL instructions. –  Zan Lynx Feb 19 '10 at 22:20
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3 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

A crash course in kernel mode in one stack overflow answer

Good questions! (Interview questions?)


  • What happens (in detail) when a thread makes a system call by raising interrupt 80?

The int $80 operation is vaguely like a function call. The CPU "takes a trap" and restarts at a known address in kernel mode, typically with a different MMU mode as well. The kernel will save many of the registers, though it doesn't have to save the registers that a program would not expect an ordinary function call to save.

  • What work does Linux do to the thread's stack and other state?

Typically an OS will save registers that the ABI promises not to change during procedure calls. The stack will stay the same; the kernel will run on a per-thread kernel stack rather than the per-thread user stack. Naturally some state will change, otherwise there would be no reason to do the system call.

  • What changes are done to the processor to put it into kernel mode?

This is usually entirely automatic. The CPU has, generically, a software-interrupt instruction that is a bit like a functional-call operation. It will cause the switch to kernel mode under controlled conditions. Typically, the CPU will change some sort of PSW protection bit, save the old PSW and PC, start at a well-known trap vector address, and may also switch to a different memory management protection and mapping arrangement.

  • After running the interrupt handler, how is control restored back to the calling process?

There will be some sort of "return from interrupt" or "return from trap" instruction, typically, that will act a bit like a complicated function-return instruction. Some RISC processors did very little automatically and required specific code to do the return and some CISC processors like x86 have (never-really-used) instructions that would execute dozens of operations documented in pages of architecture-manual pseudo-code for capability adjustments.

  • What if the system call can't be completed quickly: e.g. a read from disk. How does the interrupt handler relinquish control so that the processor can do other stuff while data is being loaded and how does it then obtain control again?

The kernel itself is threaded much like a threaded user program is. It just switches stacks (threads) and works on someone else's process for a while.

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Good answer. Not interview questions - I'm just interested! On the last point, does the system call give up execution voluntarily or does it get interrupted by some hardware timer interrupt? Thanks. –  abc Feb 19 '10 at 21:25
    
The kernel will generally work steadily on the system call but if it requires I/O ops then these will probably be interrupt-driven. So, the kernel will start the I/O op, and then switch to another process (very much like thread switching, as noted) until the interrupt comes in. The kernel will note that the system-calling PID is runnable again. It will put it on a run queue and then next time the scheduler decides it's time for someone new to run, it will come off the queue. Often, it's the only runnable process there anyway. –  DigitalRoss Feb 19 '10 at 21:42
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+1 - These are the kinds of answers that make SO ... well ... SO :) –  Tim Post Feb 20 '10 at 11:25
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To answer the last part of the question - what does the kernel do if the system call needs to sleep -

After a system call, the kernel is still logically running in the context of the same task that made the system call - it's just in kernel mode rather than user mode - it is NOT a separate thread and most system calls do not invoke logic from another task/thread. What happens is that the system call calls wait_event, or wait_event_timeout or some other wait function, which adds the task to a list of tasks waiting for something, then puts the task to sleep, which changes its state, and calls schedule() to relinquish the current CPU.

After this the task cannot be run again until it gets woken up, typically by another task (kernel task, etc) or interrupt handler calling a wake* function which will wake up the task(s) sleeping waiting for that particular event, which means the scheduler will soon schedule them again.

It's worth noting that userspace tasks (i.e. threads) are only one type of task and there are a few others internal to the kernel which can do work as well - these are kernel threads and bottom half handlers / tasklets / task queues etc. Work which doesn't belong to any particular userspace process (for example network handling e.g. responding to pings) gets done in these. These tasks are allowed to go to sleep, unlike interrupts (which should not invoke the scheduler)

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http://tldp.org/LDP/khg/HyperNews/get/syscall/syscall86.html

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this is x86-specific answer thus too limited to be considered general. –  silpol Mar 30 '12 at 21:30
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