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Visual Studio 2008 C XP SP3

I am reading a book by Hoglund and he uses:

 HANDLE hThread = fOpenThread(
               THREAD_ALL_ACCESS,
               FALSE,
               dbg_evt.dwThreadId);

Anybody know anything about fOpenThread as I can't find any details and I am getting the error message error C3861: 'fOpenThread': identifier not found.

Thanks, R.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not part of the C standard library. Or, any library I have used. Check if he provides a definition somewhere earlier in that very book or not.

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Yeah that was what I was afraid of, looking for clarification... I'll start going back over the pages to see if I can find it, where is my microscope... –  flavour404 Feb 19 '10 at 21:23
    
I actually found the definition in the 'accompanying' text, though the author, nor anybody else said that this was the accompanying text, which was nice... –  flavour404 Feb 25 '10 at 1:18
    
@flavour404: Would it be possible to tell us in which 'accompanying' text you found the definition in, or at least give us the definition here? (Others may be searching for the answer, like I am.) –  Wood Mar 23 '11 at 18:22

Looking here: http://groups.google.com/group/microsoft.public.vc.language/browse_thread/thread/f592e476b0f70d01 and here: https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/449513/freopen-and-fopen-not-thread-safe it looks like fOpenThread() is a function call the author of your book has defined. Certainly, as far as I am aware there are two ways to create threads on windows:

  • _beginthreadex - crt
  • CreateThread - WinAPI.

I've always used the latter. I'd suggest the author is perhaps wrapping one of these functions?

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