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I have many data tables in my app (i.e. tables of data that could update at any moment, but most of the time they display the same data).

Some of these tables have fairly intensive queries behind them, so every time the user comes back to a page it runs the query again even if there are no new updates.

This is when I thought Memcached would be ideal to speed up performance for my users but I am unsure of how to implement this as I am quite new to the idea of caching.

How do I get MySQL to tell Memcached that results for a certain query have changed and that a table shouldn't come from cache next time it is loaded and instead come from the database and consequently update the cache?

Also, I think it would be better to have the data object for the table update only with new rows, but I have no idea what the process for this would be so if anyone has some ideas they can share for my use case it would be most appreciated.

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MySQL query cache will already cache result sets for queries. However, the cached result sets would get invalidated anytime the table gets updated. So, I guess there is still a good use-case for caching specific result sets with Memcached. Are you using a framework that might have an API for working with Memcached? –  dcarrith Apr 15 at 23:49
    
If you were using the Laravel framework, then this problem would be an easy one to solve. To answer your question generally though, you would need to cache a particular result set using a unique key per user (perhaps some value concatenated with user_id). If a cache record exists for a particular user, then you would load from cache. Otherwise, you would run the query and cache the result set. Then, for any page that is responsible for updating any table that is used in main query, you would invalidate the cache record by using the unique key that's based on user_id. –  dcarrith Apr 16 at 0:04

4 Answers 4

Maybe it is an option, to log when there is an update. So you could make an extra table, called update. It should have two columns, priority and date time.

Every time you refresh the page, you check, via mysql, if for a specific priority, the date-time has changed. If so, you know you need to update the data on that page. If not, you are fine with the current data.

For this to work, you will of course have to update the update table, with every database change. This can be done manually or via mysql triggers.

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A good idea, but may become complicated because I have many users using my system. So I would only want to issue an update when rows that "belong" to a user change. –  imperium2335 Apr 14 at 5:17
    
Instead of a category, you could use a userID. So every user has their own update time. –  Jeroen Apr 14 at 9:34
    
+1 It's what I initially thought. I had tried something in NodeJS a while ago that did the same thing. –  imperium2335 Apr 14 at 15:14

This is just an idea: I think you can get data from MySQL and save it to a file. Then you can use this file instead of database straightly. For updating your file you can use comet method that is using in many projects, for example facebook uses comet for notifications.

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Here's a generic answer that should help you accomplish what you're trying to do:

Let's say you have mainpage.php which contains the intensive queries you're worried about. This is assuming you already have a Memcached object singleton:

$m = new Memcached();
$m->addServer('localhost', 11211);

Somewhere in mainpage.php, you would check for a cache result set based on the $user_id:

$data = null;

if($cachedResultSet = $m->get('resultSet'.$user_id)) 
{
    $data = $cachedResultSet;
} 
else 
{
    $data = run_intensive_query($user_id);

    $m->set('resultSet'.$user_id, $data);
} 

// Then you use $data as long as it's not null

Then, whenever the MySQL tables which are part of the result set above get updated, you would want to invalidate the particular cache record for the user in question:

$m->delete('resultSet'.$user_id);

That will ensure that the next time the mainpage.php is loaded, the "stale" resultSet would no longer exist in cache, so it would retrieve new results and cache them appropriately.

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For your question:

How do I get MySQL to tell Memcached that results for a certain query have changed and that a table shouldn't come from cache next time it is loaded and instead come from the database and consequently update the cache?

You need to clear the cache when the data is updated (or wait until it expires).

Memcache is a key store... so you need a unique key that represent the data you are trying to retrieve.

For example let's say you have queries related to a blog post. A unique ID would be your post ID or it's page url/slug.

So what you normally do is before doing the query at the database you check if there is a stored version in Cache.

$memcache = new Memcache();
$memcache->connect('localhost', 11211) or die ("Could not connect");

$postId = 1234; // this would vary between each posts.
$commentsKey = 'comments_'. $postId;


$result = $memcache->get($commentsKey);

if ($result === false) { // key not found

   // only fetch when result are NOT in cache
   $pdo = new PDO();
   $stmt = $pdo->query("SELECT * FROM comments WHERE postId=". $pdo->quote($postId));
   $result = $pdo->fetchAll();

   // store it for next time
   $memcache->set($commentsKey, $result);

} //if

// use result either from cache or database
foreach ($result as $comment) {
    // do something with data
} 

Also to reset the cache (or invalidate it) you can clear the comments key when someone posts a new comment...

$memcache = new Memcache();
$memcache->connect('localhost', 11211) or die ("Could not connect");

$postId = 1234; // this would vary between each posts.
$commentsKey = 'comments_'. $postId;

$memcache->delete($commentsKey); 

// OR

$memcache->set($commentsKey, false); 

That way next time a user retreives comment it will have to pull it from the database instead of cache since $result will be false.

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