Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two 3D points: (x1, y1, z1) and (x3, y3, z3) and want to find a point (x2, y2, z2) on that line given z2, which is between z1 and z3.

Here is what I have currently:

#include<math.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<stdio.h>

double *findPoint (double x1, double y1, double z1, double x3, double y3, double z3, double z2)
{
  double *ret = malloc(3 * sizeof(double));
  double dot = (x1 * x3) + (y1 * y3) + (z1 * z3);
  printf("dot %e\n", dot);
  double magprd = ((x1 * x1) + (y1 * y1) + (z1 * z1)) * ((x3 * x3) + (y3 * y3) + (z3 * z3));
  printf("magprd %e\n", magprd);
  double angle = acos(dot / magprd);
  printf("angle %e\n", angle);
  double distance = z2 / asin(angle);
  printf("distance %e\n", distance);
  double x2 = x1 - ((distance * x1) / 3);
  double y2 = y1 - ((distance * y1) / 3);
  ret[0] = x2;
  ret[1] = y2;
  ret[2] = z2;

  return ret;
}

int main() {
    // return pointer to array containing x2, y2, z2 corresponding to
    // z=4 on line between point at x1, y1, z1 and x3, y3, z3
    double *p = findPoint(1, 2, 3, 11, 12, 13, 4);

    if(p) {
        printf("point on line at z=4 is %e, %e, %e\n", p[0], p[1], p[2]);
        free(p);
    }

    return 0;
}

This doesn't work properly, though:

$ clang -lm test.c -o test
$ ./test 
dot 7.400000e+01
magprd 6.076000e+03
angle 1.558617e+00
distance nan
point on line at z=4 is nan, nan, 4.000000e+00

How can I fix findPoint so that it solves this problem? Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can simplify your function to

double *findPoint (double x1, double y1, double z1, double x3, double y3, double z3, double z2)
{
    double *ret = malloc(3 * sizeof(double));

    double tmp = (z2 - z1)/(z3 - z1); // Assuming that z1 != z3
    double x2 = x1 + tmp * (x3 - x1);
    double y2 = y1 + tmp * (y3 - y1);
    ret[0] = x2;
    ret[1] = y2;
    ret[2] = z2;

    return ret;
}

That gives the result

point on line at z=4 is 2.000000e+00, 3.000000e+00, 4.000000e+00
share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer. But in OP (before OP edited it) is it not true that the local scope of p in main() would have prevented it from accepting the return of findPoint ? –  ryyker Apr 10 at 20:58
    
@ryyker: No. The return value of findPoint() is a pointer to the allocated memory. That pointer is assigned to p. –  Martin R Apr 10 at 21:02
    
Thanks, I see your point now. Assigning double *p equal to a function prototyped double * func(...); will work as long as memory is allocated properly in called function. I put the comment here because I deleted my answer. (it was misleading) –  ryyker Apr 10 at 21:12
    
Awesome! Great solution! Also, switched it back to malloc in findPoint, thanks! –  user3519634 Apr 10 at 21:23

You math looks very complicated. I would suggest this code:

typedef struct { double x,y,z; } Point;

Point findPoint(Point a, Point b, double z) {
    double dx = b.x - a.x;
    double dy = b.y - a.y;
    double dz = b.z - a.z;
    if(dz == 0.0) {
        // ERROR
        return (Point){ 0,0,0 };
    }
    double p = (z - a.z) / dz;
    return (Point){ a.x + p*dx, a.y + p*dy, a.z + p*dz };
}

If you do not want to use by value I suggest this:

int findPoint(const Point* a, const Point* b, double z, Point* c) {
    double dx = b->x - a->x;
    double dy = b->y - a->y;
    double dz = b->z - a->z;
    if(dz == 0.0) {
        // ERROR
        return 0;
    }
    double p = (z - a.z) / dz;
    c->x = a.x + p*dx;
    c->y = a.y + p*dy;
    c->z = a.z + p*dz };
    return 1;
}

Point* a = malloc(sizeof(Point));
a->x = 1;
a->y = 2;
a->z = 3;
Point* b = malloc(sizeof(Point));
b->x = 11;
b->y = 12;
b->z = 13;
Point* c = malloc(sizeof(Point));
if(findPoint(a,b,4,c)) {
    printf("Result: %e %e %e\n", c->x, c->y, c->z);
}
else {
    printf("Error!\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Should return value be prototyped as Point *? –  ryyker Apr 10 at 20:45
    
@ryyker: Should it? –  Danvil Apr 10 at 20:48
    
Lol, - maybe. I have just never returned a non-pointer from a function. I will have to try it. Regardless, I like the simplicity of your function (answer). –  ryyker Apr 10 at 20:59
    
I found this link which expands on what I was trying to ask... Although may not be completely relevant, as topic address array, not struct. –  ryyker Apr 10 at 21:05
    
Thanks! Struct to define Point is a great idea. –  user3519634 Apr 10 at 21:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.