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Okay I'm trying to wrap my head around the difference between stacking and heaping and reference types vs value types and what not, now I think I got a very basic understanding of this but I ran into a mind-boggling example today that I would like to have some clarification about:

public class Thing
{
}

public class Animal : Thing
{
    public int Weight;
}

public class Vegetable : Thing
{
    public int Length;
}

public void Go()
{
    Thing x = new Animal();
    Switcharoo(ref x);

    Console.WriteLine(
        "x is Animal    :   "
        + (x is Animal).ToString());
    Console.WriteLine(
        "x is Vegetable :   "
        + (x is Vegetable).ToString());
}

public void Switcharoo(ref Thing pValue)
{
    pValue = new Vegetable();
}

Now in this example the type of x will go from Animal to Vegetable. I have to admit that I don't quite understand why, when we're passing x then aren't we passing the reference to the memory adress on the heap where the Animal object resides? In that case it would seem logical for me that the only thing that Switcharoo would do is create a new instance of a Vegetable that would be "orphaned" after execution of the method would have finished.

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You are close. If I understand correctly, what will happen is that the Animal object will be what is "orphaned" and the x variable in your Go() method will then be pointing to a Vegetable object. –  dub stylee Apr 10 at 21:40
    
@dubstylee would it be accurate to say that what is happening when we're passing a pointer by reference is that pValue will actually then become a pointer to a pointer? –  Overly Excessive Apr 10 at 21:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you pass by reference, you are effectively creating an alias for a variable, so in Switcharoo, pValue is an alias for x in the Go method. As a result assigning to pValue is an assignment to x.

The type of x in Go is Thing, and at runtime this is initially pointing to an instance of the class Animal. After calling Switcharoo, x is pointing to an instance of the Vegetable class instead. The original Animal instance is now unreachable and can be collected.

When using ref is it the variable which is passed by reference, so it works the same way for references and value types like int. In Go, x will (probably) exist on the stack and before calling Switcharoo its value will be the address of the Animal instance. Inside Switcharoo, pValue is an alias for the variable x. This may be implemented as a pointer to the variable in Go but the semantics of ref do not require using pointers.

The specification describes the semantics of ref parameters:

5.1.5 Reference parameters

A reference parameter does not create a new storage location. Instead, a reference parameter represents the same storage location as the variable given as the argument in the function member or anonymous function invocation. Thus, the value of a reference parameter is always the same as the underlying variable.

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Semantically speaking would this be the same thing as saying that, when we're passing the pointer by reference, then pValue becomes a pointer to a pointer? –  Overly Excessive Apr 10 at 21:48
    
@OverlyExcessive - The runtime might implement ref using pointers, but the semantics of ref are independent of their implementation. –  Lee Apr 10 at 21:54
    
I can understand how this can work with reference types since they reside on the heap but how can this work with value types? If x was an int and we passed it by reference, then seeing as ints are value types wouldn't the value of x reside on the (now inaccessible) stack frame? Thus making it inaccessible to Switcharoo. –  Overly Excessive Apr 10 at 21:58
    
@OverlyExcessive - I've updated with an explanation if that helps? You pass variables themselves by ref, so it works the same way for references and value types. –  Lee Apr 10 at 22:06

If you pass a parameter by reference, then you pass a reference to the original value and this original value can be changed. If this value is of a reference type, then, what the methods gets, is a reference to a reference!

This allows the method to change the original reference. What Switcharoo does, is to assign a new Vegetable to x.


If the parameter is not by reference, the method gets a copy of the original value. But if the parameter type is a reference type, then the method can still change the properties of the original object, which is referenced, but it cannot change the original reference as it only gets a copy of the original reference. The method can then only change its local copy of the reference.


By reference

   Thing x
  +-------+          +--------+
  |   O---|--------->| object |
  +-------+          +--------+
        ^
        |
public void Switcharoo(ref Thing pValue)
{       |
    +---|---+
    |   O   | pValue
    +-------+
}

By value

   Thing x  
  +-------+          +--------+  
  |   O---|--------->| object |
  +-------+          +--------+
                         ^
                         |
public void Switcharoo(Thing pValue)
{    pValue              |
    +-------+            |
    |   O---|------------+ 
    +-------+
}
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Right, but if the parameter we're passing is a reference type, then we're always going to pass a reference to the memory adress on the heap where the actual instance of that object resides right? That's why I think it's a bit confusing that you can pass pointer by reference .. But I "think" I understand what you're saying. –  Overly Excessive Apr 10 at 21:51
    
If the parameter we're passing is a reference type, then technically spoken, we're going to pass a reference to the location where the reference to memory address on the heap is stored. But logically spoken, the parameter name is just another name for the original variable or field (which is much less mindboggling). –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Apr 10 at 22:12

When you pass a reference type using ref it means that you can change the reference itself. That means in your case that you will create a new Vegetable and put the reference to it inside x.

Now without ref the local x inside Switcharoo is different than the outer x inside Go, but that changes with ref. Now they have the same value.

Conceptually, what you are doing is sending a reference to x, which is in itself a reference to Animal. When you change it, x holds a reference to your new Vegetable.


Pass Reference Type by value:

  1. x = new Animal() -> x = 0x0001. (0x0001 is Animal's memory location)
  2. Switcharoo() -> x = 0x0001 and pValue = 0x0001.
  3. pValue = new Vegetable() -> x = 0x0001 and pValue = 0x0002 (0x0002 is Vegetable's memory location)
  4. Switcharoo() ends -> x = 0x0001

Pass Reference Type by ref:

  1. x = new Animal() -> x = 0x0001.
  2. Switcharoo() -> x = 0x0001 and pValue = 0x0001.
  3. pValue = new Vegetable() -> x = 0x0002 and pValue = 0x0002 (Because x and pValue are 2 names for the same memory location that holds 0x0002)
  4. Switcharoo() ends -> x = 0x0002
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