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I have the following code which I intend to create a Map with self defined types variable and location. I understand that the key type should be ordered (some comparator function). How shall I add these rules to make this work? Also, I find the code ugly here. Do I really need the ;; at the end of a type and module?

type variable = string;;
type location = int;;
module LocationMap = Map.Make(variable);;
module EnvironmentMap = Map.Make(location);;

EDIT This is the rest of my code:

type variable = Variable of string
type location = Location of int
module LocationMap = Map.Make(struct type t = variable let compare = compare end)
module EnvironmentMap = Map.Make(struct type t = variable let compare = compare end)

(*file read function*)
let read_file filename =
  let lines = ref [] in
  let chan = open_in filename in
  try
    while true do
      lines := input_line chan :: !lines
    done;
    !lines
  with End_of_file ->
    close_in chan;
    List.rev !lines
in

(*get the inputs*)
let inputs = read_file Sys.argv.(1) in
for i = 0 to List.length inputs - 1 do
  Printf.printf "%s\n" (List.nth inputs i)
done;

This has a syntax error. I am not sure why.
EDIT2
I make this work with the following edit:

type variable = Variable of string
type location = Location of int
module LocationMap = Map.Make(struct type t = variable let compare = compare end)
module EnvironmentMap = Map.Make(struct type t = variable let compare = compare end)

(*file read function*)
let read_file filename =
  let lines = ref [] in
  let chan = open_in filename in
  try
    while true do
      lines := input_line chan :: !lines
    done;
    !lines
  with End_of_file ->
    close_in chan;
    List.rev !lines

(*get the inputs*)
let () = 
  let inputs = read_file Sys.argv.(1) in
  for i = 0 to List.length inputs - 1 do
    Printf.printf "%s\n" (List.nth inputs i)
  done;

Sorry for the long list of questions, what does let () = do here? Is it true that when I define a function with let, I do not need in?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When applying the Map.Make functor, you need to supply a struct containing your type and a compare function:

module LocationMap =
    Map.Make(struct type t = variable let compare = compare end)
module EnvironmentMap =
    Map.Make(struct type t = location let compare = compare end)

You never need to use ;; in compiled code. It's only required when using the toplevel, to tell it when it should evaluate what you've typed in so far.

Some people do use ;; in compiled code, but you never need to do this and I personally never do. There is always a way to get the same effect without using ;;.

Update

The let compare = compare binds the pre-existing OCaml function compare (the infamous polymorphic comparison function) to the name compare inside the struct. So, it creates a Map that uses polymorphic compare to do its comparisons. This is often what you want.

I created a file containing your definitions (without ;;) and the above code, then compiled it with ocamlc -c. There were no syntax errors. I'm positive you don't need to use ;;, as I've written many many thousands of lines of code without it.

Note that I'm not saying that if you remove ;; from syntactically correct OCaml code, the result is always syntactically correct. There are a few idioms that only work when you use ;;. I personally just avoid those idioms.

Update 2

A let at top level of a module is special, and doesn't have an in. It defines a global value of the module. OCaml treats every source file as a module (for free, as I like to say), with a name that's the same as the source file name (capitalized).

You can actually have any pattern in let pattern = expression. So let () = ... is completely normal. It just says that the expression has unit type (hence the pattern matches).

share|improve this answer
    
This works. But could you please tell me what does let compare = compare end mean? As for the ;; issue, if I take away all the ;;, there is a syntax error. –  Ra1nWarden Apr 11 '14 at 4:16
    
Does the updated code contain one of the idioms you mentioned? –  Ra1nWarden Apr 11 '14 at 4:30
    
Please take a look at the updated question. Thank you very much! –  Ra1nWarden Apr 11 '14 at 4:45
1  
If you want to write top-level statements (unit expressions) (not top-level lets), you need to use ;; to separate the expressions from the lets. My solution (which is exactly what you did) is to use let () = ... for top-level statements. –  Jeffrey Scofield Apr 11 '14 at 4:50

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