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I have some code here that works for parsing URI paths into a list of Strings. For examples /user/home would become ["user", "home"].

pathPiece :: Parser String   
pathPiece = do
      char '/'
      path <- many1 urlBaseChar
      return path

uriPath :: Parser [String]
uriPath = do
    pieces <- many pathPiece
    try $ char '/'
    return pieces

parseUriPath :: String -> [String]
parseUriPath input = case parse uriPath "(unknown)" input of
                   Left  _  -> []
                   Right xs -> xs

However, there if the path ends with another / such as /user/home/, which should be a legitimate path, the parser will fail. This is because pathPiece fails to parse the last / since there are no following urlBaseChars. I am wondering how you parse with many until it fails, and if it fails you undo character consumption.

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A note on style, do { x <- m; return x } is equivalent to m (guaranteed by the monad laws!) so pathPiece can be simplified a bit. –  cdk Apr 11 at 18:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try this:

pathPiece :: Parser String   
pathPiece = try $ do
    char '/'
    many1 urlBaseChar

uriPath :: Parser [String]
uriPath = do
    pieces <- many pathPiece
    optional (char '/')
    return pieces

You need to add a try to pathPiece. Otherwise, parsing the final / will make Parsec think that a new pathPiece has started, and without try, there's no backtracking. Also, unless you actually want to require a final /, you need to make it optional. The function try does not do that.

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Thanks for the help kosmikus. That works just right, and I learned a few things about Parsec ;) –  MCH Apr 11 at 18:02

I think you can use many1 urlBaseChar `sepEndBy` char '/' here. See sepEndBy in Parsec.

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