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I have this class called BluetoothDeviceInfo from 32feet library to handle, obviously, Bluetooth related stuff.

I have created my program and it worked. However, I need to add some information to a "more complete", lets say, class which also carries GPS information.

So what I did was to created a new class MyDeviceInfo and derive it from BluetoothDeviceInfo as the code below.

Base* (which I don't have control on)

namespace InTheHand.Net.Sockets
{
    public class BluetoothDeviceInfo : IComparable
    {
        public BluetoothDeviceInfo(BluetoothAddress address);
        public bool Authenticated { get; }
        public ClassOfDevice ClassOfDevice { get; }
        public bool Connected { get; }
        public BluetoothAddress DeviceAddress { get; }
        public string DeviceName { get; set; }
      .
      .
      .

Derive*

public class MyDeviceInfo : BluetoothDeviceInfo
{
    private bool gpsSignal;

    public MyDeviceInfo(BluetoothAddress address) : base(address) 
    {
        gpsSignal = false;
    }

    #region Properties

    public bool GpsSignal { get { return gpsSignal; } set { gpsSignal = value;}}
}

And I substituted all my BluetoothDeviceInfo types in my code with MyDeviceInfo types.

Everything seems working except this part.

This particular method called Client.DiscoverDevice() returns a list of Bluetooth devices available in the type BluetoothDeviceInfo. And since this is of a type base class, it doesn't make sense that I would cast it to a variable of my derive class MyDeviceInfo and I can't get past this point since I need the list of devices. Even though sounding wrong I tried to cast it using this code (which obviously didn't work)

IEnumerable<MyDeviceInfo> _discoveredCsaDevices = (IEnumerable<MyDeviceInfo>)cli.DiscoverDevices().Where(d => (d.DeviceName.StartsWith(...

Since this logic doesn't fit into inheritance I thought of composition. However, this isn't quite fit the composition line of thought such as object Bird can have flying functionality of type Airplane but not the whole lot cuz I actually need my driven class include all the functionality of BluetoothDeviceInfo.

I want to understand the big picture here and what would be approach to do such a thing.

Will be happy to hear you thoughts and guides on this.

Cheers

share|improve this question
    
Probably a combination of Decorator and Adapter. –  rwong Apr 11 '14 at 5:10
    
What is the runtime type of the return value from Client.DiscoverDevice()? Are they MyDeviceInfo or BluetoothDeviceInfo ? –  Ned Stoyanov Apr 11 '14 at 5:16
    
Client.DiscovereDevice() is one of the 32feet library methods and it returns a value of the type BluetoothDeviceInfo which originally worked since it matched the variable of the same type. –  Mehrad Apr 11 '14 at 5:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

IEnumerable<MyDeviceInfo> _discoveredCsaDevices = (cli.DiscoverDevices().Where(d => (d.DeviceName.StartsWith(...).Select (b => new MyDeviceInfo(b.DeviceAddress)).ToList();

You may need to provide a MyDeviceInfo constructor that takes a BluetoothDeviceInfo and copies all the properties.

Update

The code then becomes:

public class MyDeviceInfo : BluetoothDeviceInfo
{
    private bool gpsSignal;

    MyDeviceInfo(BluetoothDeviceInfo btInfo)
    {
        this.Authenticated = btInfo.Authenticated;
        this.ClassOfDevice = btInfo.ClassOfDevice;
        this.Connected = btInfo.Connected;
        this.DeviceAddress = btInfo.DeviceAddress;
        this.DeviceName = btInfo.DeviceName;
    }

    public MyDeviceInfo(string address) : base(address) 
    {
        gpsSignal = false;
    }

    public bool GpsSignal { get { return gpsSignal; } set { gpsSignal = value;}}        
}

And you use it like this:

IEnumerable<MyDeviceInfo> _discoveredCsaDevices = (cli.DiscoverDevices().Where(d => (d.DeviceName.StartsWith(...).Select (b => new MyDeviceInfo(b)).ToList();

share|improve this answer
    
Holly mother of Dumblarode... This worked! I mean this is definitely over my knowledge of inheritance but when I look at it, it makes perfect sense. –  Mehrad Apr 11 '14 at 5:32
    
would you please be able to update your answer, with a bit of description for the part you added to the end? I really would love to understand this part better. –  Mehrad Apr 11 '14 at 5:35
1  
I added the bit about the constructor. You are essentially copy constructing a MyDeviceInfo instance from a BluetoothDeviceInfo instance –  Ned Stoyanov Apr 11 '14 at 5:43
1  
Note that we are now doing .Select (b => new MyDeviceInfo(b)) –  Ned Stoyanov Apr 11 '14 at 5:43

Application note.

To the extent that inheritance works, use that. See Ned Stoyanov's answer. My answer below should only be used if the library class is sealed.


Problem #1 - Library class was sealed and wasn't dependent on an interface, therefore I cannot substitute it with my own class.

Solution: Make an interface anyway.

public interface IMyDeviceInfo : IComparable
{
    BluetoothDeviceInfo(BluetoothAddress address);
    bool Authenticated { get; }
    ClassOfDevice ClassOfDevice { get; }
    bool Connected { get; }
    BluetoothAddress DeviceAddress { get; }
    string DeviceName { get; set; }
    ...
}

Problem #2 - How can I stuff the library class under my interface?

Solution: Make an adapter.

public class DeviceInfoAdapter : IMyDeviceInfo 
{
    private BluetoothDeviceInfo m_theRealStuff;

    // Allow yourself to bypass the abstraction to 
    // get down to the real object, because it may 
    // just be unavoidable in some cases.
    // You may also mark it [Obsolete] or comment it out 
    // until you encounter a real need for it.
    internal BluetoothDeviceInfo TheRealStuff
    {
        get { return m_theRealStuff; }
    }

    // Constructor. If the real stuff has been created by someone else.
    public DeviceInfoAdapter(BluetoothDeviceInfo theRealStuff)
    {
        m_theRealStuff = theRealStuff;
    }

    // Constructor. A knock-off copy of the real stuff constructor.
    public DeviceInfoAdapter(BluetoothAddress address)
    {
        m_theRealStuff = new BluetoothDeviceInfo(address);
    }

    // Imitate all properties and methods on the real stuff.
    public bool Authenticated
    { 
        get 
        { 
            return m_theRealStuff.Authenticated; 
        }
    }

    // ... 
    // Basically, for every publicly-accessible method or property, 
    // you just call the real stuff.
}

Problem #3 - How do I add extra properties to it?

Solution: Make a decorator.

public interface IMyDeviceInfoExtra : IMyDeviceInfo
{
    bool GpsSignal { get; set; }
}

public class MyDeviceInfoWithGps : IMyDeviceInfoExtra
{
    private IMyDeviceInfo m_theRealStuff;
    private bool m_gpsSignal;

    public MyDeviceInfoWithGps(IMyDeviceInfo theRealStuff)
    {
        m_theRealStuff = theRealStuff;
    }

    // the same thing again ... lots of code duplications

    // The only new member here
    public bool GpsSignal
    {
        get { return m_gpsSignal; }
        set { m_gpsSignal = value; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for your detailed and educational answer. I have never came across these two concepts before. a question. In point #1 when you say I cannot substitute it with my own class what do you exactly mean by that. You mean derive from it or? –  Mehrad Apr 11 '14 at 5:38
    
Actually, if inheritance is allowed, then it is fine to use it. Therefore, Ned Stoyanov's answer is more suitable as long as you can use it. In C# however, it is possible to mark a class as sealed (which fortunately your library doesn't). That keyword prevents derivation and would have forced its users to workaround that by using design patterns. –  rwong Apr 11 '14 at 8:27
    
Now I exactly understand what you mean. Really appreciate the explanation. –  Mehrad Apr 13 '14 at 22:45

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