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Possible duplicate: need-help-returning-object-in-thread-run-method

Hello. I have a class implementing runnable and I have a List, storing Threads instantiated with different objects of that class. How can I access properties of underlying objects given the thread object running them? Here is an example:

public class SO {
    public static class TestRunnable implements Runnable {
        public String foo = "hello";

        public void run() {
            foo = "world";
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Thread t = new Thread(new TestRunnable());
        t.start();
        //How can I get the value of `foo` here?
    }
}
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1  
Aside from not really being sure what you have in mind, I think you will need reflection for this, and also be sure there is no security manager in your way. However, maybe you could describe in more detail what it is you are trying to achieve. –  Daniel Schneller Feb 20 '10 at 0:50
    
I believe you can subclass Thread itself and override Thread.run() instead of passing it a Runnable. Then foo would just be an attribute of the Thread. –  MatrixFrog Feb 20 '10 at 0:52
1  
@MatrixFrog: This is no good if the Runnable class needs to subclass something else, since Java only allows single inheritance. The main purpose of java.lang.Runnable, as far as I can tell, is to get around this issue by allowing you to use Thread(java.lang.Runnable) to add thread functionality to a class that already subclasses something else. –  Platinum Azure Feb 20 '10 at 0:56
1  
Honestly I can't figure out any possible reason why you'd want to do this. Perhaps you should be asking a different question? –  Spencer Ruport Feb 20 '10 at 1:20
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9 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't see any way to do it in the java.lang.Thread docs.

My best answer, then, is that you probably should be using List<Runnable> instead of (or in addition to) List<Thread>. Or perhaps you want some sort of map structure so that you can access the Runnable from the Thread. (For example, java.util.HashMap<java.lang.Thread, java.lang.Runnable>)

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You can use code quotes to directly just use <>'s, wrapping the List<Runnable> with `'s –  Tanzelax Feb 20 '10 at 1:07
    
@Tanzelax: Oh wow, I knew that too. Why I didn't think of using that to format my code, I don't know. All I can say is, it's been a really long day. Thanks for the tip. –  Platinum Azure Feb 20 '10 at 1:49
    
I'm curious about the downvote. Whoever did it, care to explain? –  Platinum Azure Feb 20 '10 at 4:09
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The concurrency library supports this well. Note: If your task throws an Exception, the Future will hold this and throw a wrapping exception when you call get()

ExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadedExecutor();

Future<String> future = executor.submit(new Callable<String>() { 
   public String call() { 
      return "world"; 
   } 
}); 

String result = future.get(); 
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2  
You probably want to shutdown the executor afterwards. –  Thilo Feb 20 '10 at 12:23
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TestRunnable r = new TestRunnable();
Thread t = new Thread(r);
t.start();
//there you need to wait until thread is finished, or just a simple Thread.sleep(1000); at this case
System.out.println(r.foo);

BTW, in real case you need to use Callable and FutureTask

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1  
So in summary, there's no way it can be done, right? You need to keep a reference to both the Thread and the Runnable. I'd be grateful if you could substantiate your claim about needing Callable and FutureTask. –  Platinum Azure Feb 20 '10 at 1:02
    
Yes, you need a reference to object you running and that returns result to you, a Runnable at this case. Callable and FutureTask is more appropriate way to do things that you want. –  Igor Artamonov Feb 20 '10 at 1:10
1  
I guess I'm just not seeing it. –  Platinum Azure Feb 20 '10 at 1:50
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If you want to return the value of an asynchronous calculation, look at Callable and FutureTask:

FutureTask<String> task = new FutureTask(new Callable<String>() {
   public String call() {
      return "world";
   }
});
new Thread(task).start();
String result = task.get();
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This is how you could implement this directly.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // Keep a reference to the runnable object for later ...
    TestRunnable r = new TestRunnable();
    Thread t = new Thread(r);
    t.start();
    // Wait until the child thread has finished
    t.join();
    // Pull the result out of the runnable.
    System.out.println(r.foo);
}

However, the modern (less error prone) way to do this kind of thing is to use the higher-level concurrency classes in java.util.concurrent.

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I think in general you can/should avoid doing this, but if you really need to do it shouldn't something like MatrixFrog's suggestion work (untested):

class RunnableReferencingThread extends Thread {
    public final Runnable runnable;
    public RunnableReferencingThread(Runnable r) {
        this.runnable = r;
        super(r);
    }
}

?

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That won't compile as written. –  gerardw Mar 13 at 19:38
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You could subclass Thread, and add the method you need. You'll have to keep your own copy of the target Runnable and override all the Thread constructors you use to create the Thread, because of some annoying implementation details of Thread.

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I had the same problem. Here is my solution:

public static class TestRunnable implements Runnable {
    public String foo = "hello";

    public void run() {
        foo = "world";
    }

public static void main(String[] args) {
    TestRunnable runobject = new TestRunnable();
    Thread t = new Thread(runobject);
    runobject.foo;  //The variable from runnable. hello;
    t.start();
    runobject.foo;  //The variable from runnable. world;
}
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If your thread has state information, forget Runnable and simply extend Thread, overriding the run method.

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