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I'm trying to fill an array with names from a file:

Andrew
Andy
Bob
Dan
Derek
Joe
Pete
Richy
Steve
Tyler

Here is the function I wrote...but the program crashes when I run it:

#include <stdio.h>

main(){
  int i=0, size=10;
  char fname[15];
  char** data;
  char* name;
  FILE* fp;

  printf("Enter a filename to read names:\n");
  scanf("%s", fname);

  fp = fopen(fname, "r");
  if(fp == NULL)
    exit();

  data = (char**)malloc(sizeof(char**)*size);

  while(!feof(fp)){
    fscanf(fp, "%s", name);
    data[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(name));
    data[i] = name;
    i++;
  }

  fclose(fp);

  printf("\n\n");

  for(i=0; i<size; i++)
    printf("%s ", data[i]);

  free(data);
}

Anyone know what I'm doing wrong? Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have a couple of errors here:

1) You never allocate memory where name will get stored. You could get around this simply by using:

char name[128];

Then, when you use fscanf, you'd have:

fscanf(fp, "%127s", name); // stores this in name correctly, now...

2) You're inappropriately allocating space for data[i]:

data[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(name));

This will allocate space to hold one pointer to char (char*), since name is a char*. You need to be doing:

data[i] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * (strlen(name) + 1 ) );

This will allocate enough space for the data plus a single terminating character.

3) You aren't assigning data[i] correctly. You can't just use = here, but need to use strcpy:

strcpy(data[i], name);

4) You're not freeing the individual pointers in the data[..] elements. You should add, after your printf, a free:

for(i=0; i<size; i++)
{
    printf("%s ", data[i]);
    free(data[i]);  // Free each pointer you allocate
}

Every malloc call should eventually have a matching free call.

share|improve this answer
    
Reed, I'm not going to downvote because you answered succintly and correctly, but you aren't helping him when you don't make him think about the process. –  San Jacinto Feb 20 '10 at 1:03
    
Great thanks a lot, it is working now. And yes I now understand what I did wrong. –  Andrew Feb 20 '10 at 1:03
1  
@San Jacinto: I don't know - I felt like this was clear,but not just rewriting all of his code. Hard to help without pointing out why things are flaws... but I do see your point. @Andrew: I'm glad it's working, and you understand it now. –  Reed Copsey Feb 20 '10 at 1:07

There are quite a few problems. Other answer talk about name not being initialized, so I won't repeat that.

A second problem is that you are not handling EOF correctly. feof will only return true once you've tried to read just past the end of the file. So you will get an empty 11'th name.

A final problem is that the data array can only hold 10 names. Because of the second problem you'll overflow the buffer with the blank 11'th name. Furthermore, your code depends on the details of the input file - give it a different input file with more names and you'll still crash even after fixing problem 2.

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You never allocate space for name. But you put stuff in on this line:

 fscanf(fp, "%s", name);

change

 char name[100];

and

fscanf(fp, "%99s", name);

you should limit the imput to filename too:

scanf("%14s", fname);

also you never free the data for each element in the array, if this were a sub-routine in a larger system it would have a memory leak.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh...but how do I know how much space to allocate if I don't know how long the name is going to be? Do I have to scan characters on every line and count? –  Andrew Feb 20 '10 at 0:53
    
you should have a line length limit; create a buffer and scan into it - the rest will be truncated. If you want an endlessly long lines possible, you should dynamically reallocate the buffer until everything is read. Then allocate exactly the number of bytes in the name (+1) and strncpy the name into it. –  kibitzer Feb 20 '10 at 0:56
    
I alway just made a really big buffer. But you can scan first and count if you want. For a homework assignment you can just make a big buffer IMHO –  Hogan Feb 20 '10 at 0:56
    
Ok, now the program doesn't crash...but when I print it prints Tyler Tyler Tyler...10 times. –  Andrew Feb 20 '10 at 0:57
    
right you have to allocate space for name in data and do a strcpy not an assignment. see this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/2241834/… –  Hogan Feb 20 '10 at 1:00

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