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I'm not trying to start an argument here, but for whatever reason it's typically stated that Visual Basic is case insensitive and C languages aren't (and somehow that is a good thing).

But here's my question: Where exactly is Visual Basic case insensitive? When I type...

Dim ss As String
Dim SS As String

...into the Visual Studio 2008 or Visual Studio 2010 IDE, the second one has a warning of "Local variable SS is already declared in the current block". In the VBA VBE, it doesn't immediately kick an error, but rather just auto-corrects the case.

Am I missing something here with this argument that Visual Basic is not case sensitive? (Also, if you know or care to answer, why would that be a bad thing?)

Why am I even asking this question?

I've used Visual Basic in many of its dialects for years now, sometimes as a hobbyist, sometimes for small business-related programs in a workgroup. As of the last six months, I've been working on a big project, much bigger than I anticipated. Much of the sample source code out there is in C#. I don't have any burning desire to learn C#, but if there are things I'm missing out on that C# offers that Visual Basic doesn't (an opposite would be VB.NET offers XML Literals), then I'd like to know more about that feature. So in this case, it's often argued that C languages are case sensitive and that's good and Visual Basic is case insensitive and that is bad. I'd like to know...

  1. how exactly is Visual Basic case insensitive because every single example in the code editor becomes case sensititive (meaning case gets corrected) whether I want it or not and
  2. is this compelling enough for me to consider moving to C# if VB.NET case is somehow limiting what I could do with code?
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14  
This is not a bad question. –  anon271334 Feb 20 '10 at 4:11
5  
+1 I've wondered about exactly this same thing before. –  Jordan Arron Feb 20 '10 at 4:23
3  
Ummm...not sure that you understand what case-in*sensitive means. Because VB is in fact case insensitive, SS and ss *are the same name, whereas in C they would not be. –  Ed S. Feb 20 '10 at 11:38
1  
@ed: I can't use both SS and ss in VB, whichever I use first is the one that the editor uses. –  Todd Main Feb 20 '10 at 15:06
13  
You are (or were) thinking about this upside down. It's precisely because the compiler is case-insensitive that the error reads 'variable SS already declared'. If it was case-sensitive you'd get either a 'ss variable not used' or no error at all and a bug if you used alternatively one and the other. –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Mar 15 '10 at 19:02

13 Answers 13

up vote 57 down vote accepted

The difference between VBA and VB.NET is just because VB.NET compiles continuously in the background. You'll get an error when you compile the VBA.

Like Jonathan says, when programming you can think of VB.NET as case-insensitive apart from string-comparisons, XML, and a few other situations...

I think you're interested in what's under the hood. Well, the .NET Common Language Runtime is case-sensitive, and VB.NET code relies on the runtime, so you can see it must be case-sensitive at runtime, e.g. when it's looking up variables and methods.

The VB.NET compiler and editor let you ignore that - because they correct the case in your code.

If you play around with dynamic features or late-binding (Option Strict Off) you can prove that the underlying run-time is case-sensitive. Another way to see that is to realise that case-sensitive languages like C# use the same runtime, so the runtime obviously supports case-sensitivity.

EDIT If you want to take the IDE out of the equation, you can always compile from the command-line. Edit your code in Notepad so it has ss and SS and see what the compiler does.

EDIT Quote from Jeffrey Richter in the .NET Framework Design Guidelines page 45.

To be clear, the CLR is actually case-sensitive. Some programming languages, like Visual Basic, are case insensitive. When the Visual Basic compiler is trying to resolve a method call to a type defined in a case-sensitive language like C#, the compiler (not the CLR) figures out the actual case of the method's name and embeds it in metadata. The CLR knows nothing about this. Now if you are using reflection to bind to a method, the reflection APIs do offer the ability to do case-insensitive lookups. This is the extent to which the CLR offers case-insensitivity.

share|improve this answer
    
Best answer I've heard so far. Is there someway to prove this point that VB.Net compiler and editor let you ignore that? Is there a way to some how turn off the auto-correct? Or is there a way to compile an sln that is not written in VS IDE in MSBuild that uses both ss and SS and it will compile and work as expected? –  Todd Main Feb 20 '10 at 15:24
5  
You can turn off auto-correct by cheating. Right-click on a vb file and select "Open With". Then pick something like "XML (Text) Editor". You will lose all the VB-specific functionality like auto-correct. –  Jonathan Allen Feb 20 '10 at 20:03
    
Good additions, thank you! –  Todd Main Feb 22 '10 at 16:25
    
+1 great answer, and good question as well Otaku (i think you already knew but wanted to draw out a good definition hey?) –  Anonymous Type Jan 21 '11 at 0:23
    
VB.NET compiler/IDE isn't 100% case-insensitive. For example Dim pdfWriter As PDFWriter is completely valid. VB.NET allows you to differentiate between class names and variable names, which is a nice touch, as it's common practice in fully case-sensitive languages. –  ingredient_15939 Oct 10 '13 at 18:52

Part of the problem here is you need to divide the language from the IDE experience.

As a language, VB.NET is certainly a case insensitive with respect to identifiers. Calling DateTime.Parse and datetime.parse will bind to the exact same code. And unlike languages like C#, it is not possible to define methods or types which differ only by case.

As an IDE, VB.NET attempts to preserve the case of existing identifiers when it pretty lists a block of code. Pretty lists occur whenever you move off of the current logical line of code. In this case you move off of the second declaration of SS, the pretty lister notices there is an existing identifier with that name and corrects it to have matching case.

This behavior, though, is purely done as a user value add. It is not a part of the core language.

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1  
Thanks Jared, interesting to know that it is only the IDE. I still fail to understand why it would be a good thing to have more than one name represent different things by just case difference in the name, but I guess that's for another day. –  Todd Main Feb 20 '10 at 20:26
1  
I don't think Jared meant it's only the IDE. I think he has said the compiler is case-insensitive, so it thinks ss is identical to SS, but also as an aid to reading the IDE corrects SS to ss as you type. So even if the IDE didn't correct the case, the compiler would still see the two identifiers as identical. –  MarkJ Feb 22 '10 at 10:25
2  
"I still fail to understand why it would be a good thing to have more than one name represent different things by just case difference in the name" <-- I felt the same way before switching from VBA/VB6/VB.NET to C#, I thought that having names only differ by cases seemed outright dangerous. In practice, though, it proves to be quite useful, and, surprisingly, not prone to errors at all. –  Mike Rosenblum Apr 6 '11 at 20:14
2  
@Mike I very much disagree with that point. I've never seen mixed cased names which did anything but cause confusion. –  JaredPar Apr 6 '11 at 20:46
2  
Really? I mean something like void SetColor(color Color){this.color = color}; I realize that this might look dangerous, but it works smoothly, the compiler won't let you make a mistake, and IntelliSense gives you the correct members after "color." vs. "Color.". The thing that bothers me here is that the use of "this" is not required -- it's enforced by FxCop and/or StyleCop (I forget which), but I wish there were a setting to have the IDE always enforce this when accessing class members instead of potentially allowing the scope to be accidentally shadowed. –  Mike Rosenblum Apr 8 '11 at 1:07

VB is mostly case insensitive, but there are exceptions. For example, XML literals and comprehension is case sensitive. String comparisons are usually case sensitive, unlike say T-SQL, but there are compiler switch to make string comparisons case insensitive. And of course there are the edge cases when dealing with inheritance, COM, and Dynamic Language Runtime.

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3  
Good points on where case does matter like XML Literals and string comparisons. But when we say it is mostly case insensitive, what exactly are we talking about? Moving over to Outlook VBA, just as an example, if I type Dim mi as mailitem and subject = mi.subject, the object names will get auto-corrected to MailItem and mi.Subject. Does the compilier care (because it will always auto-correct this) or is this pretty code or...? –  Todd Main Feb 20 '10 at 5:51
1  
The compiler doesn't care. You could test this by editing a file in notepad and using the command-line compiler. –  Jonathan Allen Feb 20 '10 at 19:57
    
Yeah, just tried this. That proves it. Thanks Jonathan. –  Todd Main Feb 20 '10 at 20:23

Yes, the VB.NET compiler treats identifiers in a case insensitive way. And yes, that can cause problems when it consumes assemblies that were written in another language or uses COM components. The former case is covered by the Common Language Specification. The relevant rule is:

For two identifiers to be considered distinct, they must differ by more than just their case.

The COM case is rather crudely taken care of by the type library builder, it forces the casing of identifiers with the same name to be identical. Even when those identifiers have different roles. In other words, a method parameter with the name "index" will force a method name "Index" to be recased to "index". That has produced rather a lot of head scratching, as you might imagine :)

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VB is case preserving (in the IDE) but case insensitive. It's like Windows file system in a way. Hello.txt and hello.txt are considered to be the same file name.

The IDE assumes that the declaration a variable is the "corrrect" case for that variable, and adjusts every instance of that variable match the declaration. It does this for eye-candy and consistency reasons, but not for functionality.

I've seen several instances where the case was not automatically changed to match the declaration, and the statement works just the same. You can also use any text editor to write code that will compile just fine in different cases.

A side-note:

Most PEOPLE think in a case insensitive manner. When we see the word "dog" the word is translated into meaning in our minds. The meaning of the word is not based upon case (i.e. regardless of if spell it "DOG", "DoG", or "dOG" still barks.) COMPUTERS see words as discrete bags of bits. Uppercase and lowercase are different bit patters, and are thus different.

Since most programmers are human, case insensitivity seems more adapted to the way people think and case sensitivity is more about humans adapting how they think to the constraints of a machine.

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2  
Except that programmers need to distinguish between objects and classes, and have traditionally used a change in case to do so (not required, just a convention). So that object.method() and Object.Method() are instantly recognised as object and class references and methods (if you conform to that coding convention). Same as in English, you distinguish proper nouns and the beginnings of sentences with an upper case letter. So when reading or programming I don't think case insensitively, otherwise I'd be missing some meaning. –  Jason S Aug 24 '11 at 5:32
    
@Jason, It's all about what you are used to. New C programming students offer a myriad of complaints about case sensitivity at first, then, after a few courses, get used to it. The object.method() and Object.Method() is only a convention, and is the strongest case for case sensitivity. I had to modify a program written by someone else that had two variables named temp and Temp in the same scope, and I'll tell you it was very difficult to keep them straight in my head. And while we may recognize a common noun by capitalization, the words "bob" and "Bob" mean the same in our brains. –  Andrew Neely Aug 24 '11 at 11:38
    
Why does the IDE preserve case in that case? (sorry). I think the IDE preserves case because MS designers think case has some semantic, in the brain, which it does. But in reality the VB IDE considers form and Form the same, which is to me anyway, confusing. In the case (sorry again), of temp and Temp you could easily use the refactoring tools in C# to rename Temp to bobTemp or whatever. However, I am maintaining some VB and someone has gone and done Dim form As Form. Now when I rename, it renames both class and object references. Bleah! –  Jason S Aug 24 '11 at 21:34
    
@Jason, in VB I always say "Dim aform as Form", but I digress. VB supports case sensitivity in searching. Also I would search for "As Form" and replace it with "somethingstupid", then rename form to something sensible, then rename "somethingstupid"back to "As Form". I actually like it changing the case, because it verifies that I didn't fat-finger the variable name. –  Andrew Neely Aug 25 '11 at 1:34
    
Yeah but this is no substitute for a refactoring tool that will distinguish between class and instance reference when the names are the same (or differ only by case in VB). C# refactoring tools seem to be able to do that. I don't name classes and instances the same. In C# I will use case to distinguish, but in VB I can't do that so I use letters to prepend. Obviously my problem is I'm maintaining someone elses code who has used the same name. But this discussion is getting too big for comments, so I'll leave it here. –  Jason S Aug 25 '11 at 2:17

I'm not sure I understand you? VB is case insensitive, so ss and SS is the same variable, so the compiler correctly complains that you re-declared the variable.

I think that Variables are not case sensitive, but function names are.

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but if I use ss and then later type SS, it gets autocorrected to ss, which leads to me believe that the compiler does indeed care about case. –  Todd Main Feb 20 '10 at 5:40
2  
@oTAKU: That's the IDE changing the case, not the compiler. –  John Saunders Feb 20 '10 at 19:34
2  
VB still doesn't really care about case. The IDE is trying to clean the code to have variables remain the same throughout. –  guitarthrower Feb 22 '10 at 16:05

This is part of the editor you are using, they may behave differently but the fact is that Visual Basic really is case-insensitive language. So, ss and SS are same.

Please have a look at VB.NET Basics tutorial for more information :)

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oh, that's interesting. is there some place i look this detail up? i haven't yet tested, but thinking about VBScript, you may be right. –  Todd Main Feb 20 '10 at 4:08
    
@Otaku: please see my answer again i have provided the link now. Thanks –  Sarfraz Feb 20 '10 at 4:12
    
I'm quite familiar with VB, thank you :) I'm not sure what you want me to look at on that page. –  Todd Main Feb 20 '10 at 4:23
    
@Otaku: ok then that is good to listen to :) Thanks –  Sarfraz Feb 20 '10 at 4:37

Yes, VB is case insensitive. It sometimes throws those not used to it for a bit of a loop.

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One doesn't have to try all that hard in VB.NET to create code with different uppercase/lowercase "spellings" of an identifier. Changing the casing of an identifier in the file where it's declared without using the "Rename" function will not cause the name to be updated in other files, though editing any line which contains the name will cause it to conform to the present definition.

In this way, one can determine that VB.NET is mostly case insensitive, but it does make the case of identifiers available to the CLR which may use that information in case-sensitive ways.

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I can only offer this, which as I recall from my programming text books back in the early 80s, is that case senstive languages were, (at that time) strictly intended to reduce compile time errors. That is to say, the "strictness" was intended to develop a coding discipline of greater accuracy. As it has turned out the addition of proper labeling of variables, classes, methods, functions, and whatever else you wish to throw in there, evolved as well.

I recall almost all of those books included a recommended pattern for leading capitalization, lower case, etc. As we all know, much of that has been thrown out or should I say, ignored in practice, save for the high end production houses, and CASE solutions, or for those that have reached a higher skill level. I think everyone experiences this learning curve.

Given the advancement of these langauges and IDE's, the better question becomes, which language improves my dev time? Of course if you are not familiar with each of the various langs, your options are limited.

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I'll try to answer your second question.

"is this compelling enough for me to consider moving to C# if VB.NET case is somehow limiting what I could do with code?"

Create a WCF WebService using C#. Create a DataContract (1 Class). One with "string email" property. Another with "string Email" as another property. Your choice to understand as personal email or office email. Or it could be in two different DataContracts.

For C# this is fine. The web service is created fine. A C# program can easily create a WSDL and everything is fine.

Now try to create a WSDL with VB (any version). It will say "email" is already declared and WSDL generation fails.

Like everyone I assumed this is a drawback in VB language. But!!!

Use FxCOP and analyze the original C# code. FxCOP says using email/Email is an issue. Recommends to use different name supporting case insensitivity. Also note as of date .NET framework has 106 programming languages and there are many languages having case sensitivity ON. We are all moving towards cloud and want our services to be accessible by all programming platform/languages.

So being case sensitive is your choice within your program and if you are C guy you would like it. If the program is going to be used/accessed by other non C programs you need to support case insensitivity but your language is your choice.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_C_Sharp_and_Visual_Basic_.NET http://www.vbrad.com/article.aspx?id=65

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I've not seen anyone comment on your explicit 2nd question at the end: "2: is this compelling enough for me to consider moving to C# if VB.NET case is somehow limiting what I could do with code?"

i prefer the more option approach that C# lets the programmer choose whether than limiting the programmer's options. i highly prefer C#, but for case sensitivity alone, i would not even think it close to learning a language just because it is case sensitive. all the features are what matter, and when i look at advantages of both, C# and VB.NET, i highly prefer C#. but i will give you a true balanced perspective, biased yes, because i have a preference, but i will be honest about the disadvantages of C# too.

first off, both languages have advantages and disadvantages. the differences that you can do in one language that cannot be done in the other is dwindling as, thankfully, Microsoft is improving both languages, and they seem to not be showing unfair partiality toward either language.

when C# first came out, VB did not have its XML comments that you could put before methods, which i loved in C#. i hated that in VB.NET. but i've seen over the years, that many features that are not in one language get added to the other. (the same team of MS developers develop both C# and VB, so it makes sense that the features should become quite similar.)

but you asked for what C# has that VB doesn't. here's some i can think of immediately:

1: C# is more concise and takes less typing.. in MANY ways! i've even seen stupidity speaking when the opposite claim is made, that VB saves typing. but please listen to the people who tell you they use both languages, and neither is rarely used by them. i use both C# and VB, C# at home because i like it (and when i work with C# at work), and my more recent job requests that i use VB and not C#. so i'm getting more frequent use of VB now (for about 10 months now), but in my personal testimony, i much prefer C#, and in terms of actual typing, VB is considerably more typing. the one example i've read where someone actually tried to say VB was more concise, was giving a 'with ...' example with a long variable in the with, so in VB, you could just use '.property'. this is stupidity in claiming that VB needs less typing. there are a few things (and not just this example) where VB is shorter, but many more times when C# is more concise, in real practice.

but the biggest reason i believe C# is more concise, is VB's verbose "IF/THEN" statements. if statements are common. in C# there is no 'then' word to type! :) also all the 'end ...' statements take typing which in c#, is usually just one closing brace '}'. i've read that some people claim this more verboseness in VB.NET is an advantage to VB since several closing block statements/symbols can be nested and end immediately next to one another, but i quite disagree. a person can almost always write a program better in either C# or VB than another programmer because the next code revision could be designed better. this applies to the 'confusing numerous closing braces in C#' plus if the nested blocks are all the same type like several nested IF's then VB suffers the same problem as it has in C#. this is no advantage in VB. this situation is precisely why i like to comment what my closing symbol or closing statement goes with in both languages. yes, this is more verbose to do, but in either language, you have the option to be clear, which is important in judgement based, situational specific cases. i think code clarity is quite important.

2: VB does not have multi-line comments. when i worked with VB i didn't mind. then i went to a few C-style languages. now i'm back mostly using VB.NET at work, and i miss them. it's just something you find convenient, and then have to lose. :(

3: VB's 'andalso' and 'orelse' is rather annoying to type all that when in C# it is simply '&&' and '||'. again, less typing. this is not rare in my code in both VB and C#. if anything, for functionality, 'OR' vs 'OrElse' usually does not matter except 'OrElse' is faster for the computer, so if a programmer just uses 'Or' and 'And' in VB, then it produces less optimal code for someone who likes clarity of code. 'Or' is far easier to skim than 'OrElse'.

4: more flexibility in code placement in C#. when a line is long and you want to wrap it on the next line, i hate VB.NET's 'controling' readjusting of my code. C# does it a little, but i find it more useful in C#, where in VB, it is much more controling. but this is more of the VB.NET IDE vs C# IDE rather than the language itself. but i don't know whether you want both or purely the language features without IDE differences.

5: one i really miss is just creating a new block of code in C#, i might have a lot happening in a method and i want to declare a variable in a very small block of code but not have that variable declared outside that block in the entire method. in C#, we can just create a new block with '{' and end it with '}'. VB has no such feature, but it's closest match is an unconditional 'If True Then' and 'End If' block. (note the 2 character C# vs 18 character VB.NET equivalent again... more typing in VB.)

6: self increment and decrement operators: ++ and -- as in myVariable++ or ++myVariable or the equivalent decrement versions. this comes in very handy... sometimes. here is an example of actual code when i missed C# greatly:

// C#:
while (txt.Length > x)
{
    thisChar = txt[x];
    if (charsAllowedWithoutLimit.Contains(thisChar)) { ++x; }
    else if (allowLettersWithoutLimit && char.IsLetter(thisChar)) { ++x; }
    else if ((x2 = charsAllowedWithLimit.IndexOf(thisChar)) >= 0)
    {
        ++x; if (++usedCountA[x2] > charAllowedLimit[x2]) { break; }
    }
    else { break; }
}

' VB.NET:
While (txt.Length > x)
    thisChar = txt(x)
    If (charsAllowedWithoutLimit.Contains(thisChar)) Then
        x += 1
    ElseIf (allowLettersWithoutLimit AndAlso Char.IsLetter(thisChar)) Then
        x += 1
    Else
        x2 = charsAllowedWithLimit.IndexOf(thisChar)
        If (x2 >= 0) Then
            x += 1
            usedCountA(x2) += 1S
            If usedCountA(x2) > charAllowedLimit(x2) Then Exit While
        Else
            Exit While
        End If
    End If
End While

And just to give a VERY good example where C# rules, this is more code that i personally wrote recently:

// C#
public static bool IsNotWithin(this Byte   v, Byte   v1, Byte   v2) { return (v1 > v && v < v2) || (v2 < v && v > v1); }
public static bool IsNotWithin(this SByte  v, SByte  v1, SByte  v2) { return (v1 > v && v < v2) || (v2 < v && v > v1); }
public static bool IsNotWithin(this Int16  v, Int16  v1, Int16  v2) { return (v1 > v && v < v2) || (v2 < v && v > v1); }
public static bool IsNotWithin(this Int32  v, Int32  v1, Int32  v2) { return (v1 > v && v < v2) || (v2 < v && v > v1); }
public static bool IsNotWithin(this Int64  v, Int64  v1, Int64  v2) { return (v1 > v && v < v2) || (v2 < v && v > v1); }
public static bool IsNotWithin(this UInt16 v, UInt16 v1, UInt16 v2) { return (v1 > v && v < v2) || (v2 < v && v > v1); }
public static bool IsNotWithin(this UInt32 v, UInt32 v1, UInt32 v2) { return (v1 > v && v < v2) || (v2 < v && v > v1); }
public static bool IsNotWithin(this UInt64 v, UInt64 v1, UInt64 v2) { return (v1 > v && v < v2) || (v2 < v && v > v1); }
public static bool IsNotWithin(this Decimal v, Decimal v1, Decimal v2) { return (v1 > v && v < v2) || (v2 < v && v > v1); }

public static bool IsWithin(this Byte   v, Byte   v1, Byte   v2) { return (v1 <= v && v <= v2) || (v2 <= v && v <= v1); }
public static bool IsWithin(this SByte  v, SByte  v1, SByte  v2) { return (v1 <= v && v <= v2) || (v2 <= v && v <= v1); }
public static bool IsWithin(this Int16  v, Int16  v1, Int16  v2) { return (v1 <= v && v <= v2) || (v2 <= v && v <= v1); }
public static bool IsWithin(this Int32  v, Int32  v1, Int32  v2) { return (v1 <= v && v <= v2) || (v2 <= v && v <= v1); }
public static bool IsWithin(this Int64  v, Int64  v1, Int64  v2) { return (v1 <= v && v <= v2) || (v2 <= v && v <= v1); }
public static bool IsWithin(this UInt16 v, UInt16 v1, UInt16 v2) { return (v1 <= v && v <= v2) || (v2 <= v && v <= v1); }
public static bool IsWithin(this UInt32 v, UInt32 v1, UInt32 v2) { return (v1 <= v && v <= v2) || (v2 <= v && v <= v1); }
public static bool IsWithin(this UInt64 v, UInt64 v1, UInt64 v2) { return (v1 <= v && v <= v2) || (v2 <= v && v <= v1); }
public static bool IsWithin(this Decimal v, Decimal v1, Decimal v2) { return (v1 <= v && v <= v2) || (v2 <= v && v <= v1); }

' And the VB equivalent is a mess! Here goes:
<Extension()>
Public Function IsNotWithin(v As Byte, value1 As Byte, value2 As Byte) As Boolean
    Return (value1 > v AndAlso v < value2) OrElse (value2 < v AndAlso v > value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsNotWithin(v As SByte, value1 As SByte, value2 As SByte) As Boolean
    Return (value1 > v AndAlso v < value2) OrElse (value2 < v AndAlso v > value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsNotWithin(v As Int16, value1 As Int16, value2 As Int16) As Boolean
    Return (value1 > v AndAlso v < value2) OrElse (value2 < v AndAlso v > value1)
End Function

' the % suffix means 'As Integer' in VB.
<Extension()>
Public Function IsNotWithin(v%, value1%, value2%) As Boolean
    Return (value1 > v AndAlso v < value2) OrElse (value2 < v AndAlso v > value1)
End Function

' the & suffix means 'As Long' in VB.
<Extension()>
Public Function IsNotWithin(v&, value1&, value2&) As Boolean
    Return (value1 > v AndAlso v < value2) OrElse (value2 < v AndAlso v > value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsNotWithin(v As UInt16, value1 As UInt16, value2 As UInt16) As Boolean
    Return (value1 > v AndAlso v < value2) OrElse (value2 < v AndAlso v > value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsNotWithin(v As UInt32, value1 As UInt32, value2 As UInt32) As Boolean
    Return (value1 > v AndAlso v < value2) OrElse (value2 < v AndAlso v > value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsNotWithin(v As UInt64, value1 As UInt64, value2 As UInt64) As Boolean
    Return (value1 > v AndAlso v < value2) OrElse (value2 < v AndAlso v > value1)
End Function

' the @ suffix means 'As Decimal' in VB.
<Extension()>
Public Function IsNotWithin(v@, value1@, value2@) As Boolean
    Return (value1 > v AndAlso v < value2) OrElse (value2 < v AndAlso v > value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsWithin(v As Byte, value1 As Byte, value2 As Byte) As Boolean
    Return (value1 <= v AndAlso v <= value2) OrElse (value2 <= v AndAlso v <= value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsWithin(v As SByte, value1 As SByte, value2 As SByte) As Boolean
    Return (value1 <= v AndAlso v <= value2) OrElse (value2 <= v AndAlso v <= value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsWithin(v As Int16, value1 As Int16, value2 As Int16) As Boolean
    Return (value1 <= v AndAlso v <= value2) OrElse (value2 <= v AndAlso v <= value1)
End Function

' the % suffix means 'As Integer' in VB.
<Extension()>
Public Function IsWithin(v%, value1%, value2%) As Boolean
    Return (value1 <= v AndAlso v <= value2) OrElse (value2 <= v AndAlso v <= value1)
End Function

' the & suffix means 'As Long' in VB.
<Extension()>
Public Function IsWithin(v&, value1&, value2&) As Boolean
    Return (value1 <= v AndAlso v <= value2) OrElse (value2 <= v AndAlso v <= value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsWithin(v As UInt16, value1 As UInt16, value2 As UInt16) As Boolean
    Return (value1 <= v AndAlso v <= value2) OrElse (value2 <= v AndAlso v <= value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsWithin(v As UInt32, value1 As UInt32, value2 As UInt32) As Boolean
    Return (value1 <= v AndAlso v <= value2) OrElse (value2 <= v AndAlso v <= value1)
End Function

<Extension()>
Public Function IsWithin(v As UInt64, value1 As UInt64, value2 As UInt64) As Boolean
    Return (value1 <= v AndAlso v <= value2) OrElse (value2 <= v AndAlso v <= value1)
End Function

' the @ suffix means 'As Decimal' in VB.
<Extension()>
Public Function IsWithin(v@, value1@, value2@) As Boolean
    Return (value1 <= v AndAlso v <= value2) OrElse (value2 <= v AndAlso v <= value1)
End Function

Perhaps this is enuf evidence that C# is more concise. But not all programmers like conciseness. Some prefer to read "if a < b then ... " because it is more natural to their human language. And that's just fine. Preferences are fine. For me, hand effort is a factor i value, and i think anyone can get used to thinking in any symbols they prefer, for "if" and "then" are symbols of an alphabet, and C#'s "if (condition) statement;" syntax are symbols too. one is just closer to non-programmer's syntax than the other. i prefer the concise one.

I also think needing to use 'c' after character literals in VB to make it a character literal rather than a string is annoying. I like C#'s conciseness with that much more. when a method requires a character literal, you need to provide a character not a string with one character length, so sometimes you are forced to use ":"c in VB while in C# it is ':'. i think this is nit-picking tho.

To be fair, i will say there are advantages i like to VB like not having to put empty parentheses after method calls, like Dim nameUpper$ = name.ToUpperInvariant where C# requires the empty parentheses: string nameUpper = name.ToUpperInvariant(). or double that like trimming it too: Dim nameUpper$ = name.Trim.ToUpperInvariant vs string nameUpper = name.Trim().ToUpperInvariant(). I like VB's concise use of how i just used $ above to dim it ' As String' where C# does not have those shortcuts. VB has those shortcuts for String, Integer, Long, Decimal, Single, and Double types, but the disadvantage is it is less clear, so i use it with caution. but nevertheless, i prefer concise code.

Well, that's just some thots from this seasoned programmer, and as i consider, this is my programming 'testimony' of C# vs VB. both are nice languages tho, in my opinion. but yes, i still much prefer C#.

p.s. Since i plan to program for most of my life, i even re-learned to type using the most efficient keyboard: the Dvorak keyboard, which takes about 1/3 the effort to type English than on a Qwerty keyboard. look it up. maybe you might want to switch too. ;) it made my typing 67% easier! :) I encourage anyone to think outside the box and evaluate better efficiency in your work. The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard Layout and C# has done this for me. :)

P.S.S. i would compare the Dvorak and C# to metric as opposed to the Qwerty keyboard layout and VB to the Empirial measurements. Dvorak, metric, and C# are just 'clean'. BUT VB is not really far behind. But it does suffer from needing to be backward compatible to old VB6 code and pre .NET code, like the 'Or' vs 'OrElse', and 'IIF()'.

I finish with a caution. Please be more prudent that listening to people who do not really know what they are talking about. Half of all the cons against both VB and C# are not any issue anymore, and people still post about them being ignorant about what disadvantages really still do exist in the language. The best example i can think of is XML comments for methods using triple apostrophe in VB or triple slash comment symbols in C#. But please discern for yourself whether a person is speaking from ignorance, or from experience. Personal testimony means they know from their real experience. And after someone has lots of experience in it, then perk up your ears. I have more than 10 years experience in both C# and VB. And it boils down to this: both are (very) good languages. And most the differences, you can see immediately within 5 minutes of reading code. But yes, other features it may take years to find a handicap. And one handicap that i'm aware of (in C#), I can't even think of a real life situation where it would be useful. So perhaps it isn't a handicap after all.

Happy coding!

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VB.NET is case-INsensitive.

Examples:

1.

Dim a As Integer
Dim A as Integer

2.

Sub b()
    'Some statement(s) here
End Sub
Sub B()
    'Some statement(s) here
End Sub

3.

Function c() As Integer
    'Some statement(s) here
End Function
Function C() As Integer
    'Some statement(s) here
End Function

These all code will throw a COMPILE-TIME ERROR.

For the 1st example, error will be shown, saying "Local variable 'A' is already declared in the current block.".

While for the 2nd and 3rd example, error will be shown saying "'Public Sub b()' has multiple definitions with identical signatures." and "'Public Function c() As Integer' has multiple definitions with identical signatures.", respectively.

From these errors, note that the errors are thrown at different positions for variables and procedures/functions. For variables, error is thrown at 2nd declaration while for procedures/functions it is thrown at 1st declaration/definition of identical code.

As said by a user in a comment somewhere above, the VB.NET code is continuously checked and/or corrected in background; you can see this error in "Error List" window in VS IDE. And as this is AN ERROR and NOT A WARNING, the code will not compile until error is resolved.

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