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Having a base class and its specialization for void:

#include  <iostream>
template <typename T>
struct Base
{
    typedef T result_type;
    result_type get_value() { return result_type(); }
    void process_value(result_type&&) {
        std::cout << "type\n";
    }
};

template <>
struct Base<void>
{
    typedef void result_type;
    void get_value() {};
    void process_value(/*void&&*/) {
        std::cout << "void\n";
    }
};

template <typename T>
struct Derived : Base<T>
{
    typedef typename Base<T>::result_type result_type;
    // Returning void from a function call is fine.
    result_type get() { return this->get_value(); }
    void invoke() {
        // If T is void: error: invalid use of void expression
        this->process_value(get());
    }
};

int main() {
    Derived<int>().invoke();
    // Trigger a compilation faluure:
    Derived<void>().invoke();
}

Is there an elegant solution to distinguish between void and non void arguments in the call of 'process_value' (C++11 is fine) ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

One way is to substitute some empty class for void when it comes to passing the result as an argument. I don't find it very elegant, but it works:

#include  <iostream>
template <typename T>
struct Base
{
    typedef T result_type;
    result_type eval() { return result_type(); }
    result_type get_value() { return result_type(); }
    void process_value(result_type&&) {
        std::cout << "type\n";
    }
};

template <>
struct Base<void>
{
    struct value_type { };
    typedef void result_type;
    value_type eval() { return value_type{}; }
    void get_value() {};
    void process_value(value_type) {
        std::cout << "void\n";
    }
};

template <typename T>
struct Derived : Base<T>
{
    typedef typename Base<T>::result_type result_type;
    result_type get() { return this->get_value(); }
    void invoke() {
        this->process_value(this->eval());
    }
};

int main() {
    Derived<int>().invoke();
    Derived<void>().invoke();
}

To find something more elegant, I feel you may need to refactor your original problem.

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I fear this answer is the best bet. However, I would make a class (call it) None outside of Base<void> and make that the result_type. –  Dieter Lücking Apr 11 at 13:37

Slightly refactored and using C++11, this is another way to approach the problem:

First, your template specialization and main() are both unchanged:

template <>
struct Base<void>
{
    typedef void result_type;
    void get_value() {}
    void process_value( void ) {
        std::cout << "void\n";
    }
};

int main() {
    Derived<int>().invoke();
    // Trigger a compilation faluure:
    Derived<void>().invoke();
}

The first significant change is in the Derived template.

template <typename T>
struct Derived : Base<T>
{
    typedef typename Base<T>::result_type result_type;

    void invoke() {
        this->process_value();
    }
};

As you can see, I've removed get() so that may or may not any longer match your intent. It seemed that what you were attempting to do was to create a temporary something of type T and then interrogate it. That part is unchanged, but the semantics of it are moved to the Base class which uses SFINAE to do the right thing.

I've created a convenience function is_not_void() and a templated Enable_if (after Stroustrup) to make the code a little easier to read.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
template <typename T>
constexpr bool is_not_void() {
    return !std::is_void<T>::value;
}

template <bool C, typename T>
using Enable_if = typename std::enable_if<C, T>::type;

Lastly the revised Base code:

template <typename T>
struct Base
{
    typedef T result_type;

    template <typename U, typename = Enable_if<is_not_void<U>(), U>>
     U get_value() { return U(); }


    template <typename U, typename = Enable_if<is_not_void<U>(), U>>
     void do_process_value( U&&) {
        std::cout << "type\n";
    }

    void process_value() {
        do_process_value(get_value<T>());
    }
};

As you can see, the templates have a default second template argument which can only be instantiated if the type is not void. The effect is that they will always be matched for everything other than void types but the void specialization will be used in the case that the type is void. As you already know, even the declaration of a void && argument will cause the compilation to fail, which is why we can't use Enable_if within the argument list of process_value.

When run, this code produces:

type
void
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