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So here I have a basic program that will write to a specific line in a file by writing the contents of the file into a temporary file where the new line is written and then the contents of that file is then copied back into the starting file.

(Scores) = File (Sub) = Temp

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string.h>
void insert(void);

int main()
{
   insert();
}    

void insert(void)
{
    FILE *fp,*fc;
    int lineNum;  
    int count=0;  
    char ch=0;   
    int edited=0; 
    int score=0;  


    fp=fopen("Test 02 Scores.txt","r");
    fc=fopen("Sub.txt","w");

    if(fp==NULL||fc==NULL)
    {
        printf("\nError...cannot open/create files");
        exit(1);
    }
    printf("Enter the score");
    scanf("%d",&score);

    printf("\nEnter Line Number Which You Want 2 edit: ");
    scanf("%d",&lineNum);

    while((ch=fgetc(fp))!=EOF)
    {
        if(ch=='\n')  
            count++;
        if(count==lineNum-1 && edited==0)   
        {
            if(lineNum==1)
            {
            fprintf(fc,"%d\n",score);
            }
            else 
            fprintf(fc,"\n%d\n",score);

            edited=1;  

            while( (ch=fgetc(fp))!=EOF )  
            {                           
                if(ch=='\n')
                    break;
            }
       }
       else
          fprintf(fc,"%d",ch);
    }
    fclose(fp);
    fclose(fc);

    if(edited==1)
    {
        printf("\nLine has been written successfully.");

         char ch;
         FILE *fs, *ft;

         fs = fopen("Sub.txt", "r");

         if( fs == NULL )
         {
         printf("File is not real");
         exit(1);
         }

         ft = fopen("Test 02 Scores.txt", "w");

         if( ft == NULL )
         {
         fclose(fs);
         printf("File is not real\n");
         exit(1);
         }

         while( ( ch = fgetc(fs) ) != EOF )
         fputc(ch,ft);

         printf("\nFile copied\n");
         getch();

         fclose(fs);
         fclose(ft);

    }
    else
    printf("\nLine Not Found");

}

However, a problem has arisen, I started to write this code for use with strings, but since decided to use number values, whenever I try to copy with the integer values the program will not copy anything right, I Know this may be caused by the char to int but I'd rather have more help in assessing where I should change stuff.

share|improve this question
5  
fgetc() returns int not char. –  alk Apr 11 '14 at 11:38
    
Use int ch=0; to avoid subtle problems like the failure to distinguish (char) 255 from EOF and calls to is***() –  chux Apr 11 '14 at 14:37

1 Answer 1

The error is in this line

fprintf(fc,"%d",ch)

%d prints ch as an integer, not as a character, you should instead write

fprintf(fc,"%c",ch)

or use fputc()

There are some small issues with your code, here is a working version. I added comments where I changed things.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>  // needed for exit()
void insert(void);

int main()
{
  insert();
}

// use fgets to read from keyboard, it is simpler.
int readNumber()
{
  char buffer[64] = {0};
  fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), stdin);
  return atoi(buffer);
}

void insert(void)
{
  FILE *fp = NULL; // prefer one decl per row
  FILE *fc = NULL;
  int lineNum = 0;  
  int count=0;  
  int ch=0;     // should be int ch=0;
  int edited=0; 
  int score=0;  

  // file names  
  const char src[] = "Test 02 Scores.txt";
  const char dest[] = "Sub.txt";

  fp=fopen(src,"r");

  if(fp==NULL)
  {
    perror(src); // use perror() instead for better error msg
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE); // there are std constants for exit args
  }

  fc=fopen(dest,"w");

  if(fc==NULL)
  {
    perror(dest); 
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  printf("Enter the score: ");
  score = readNumber(); // using fgets to avoid lingering \n in buffer

  printf("\nEnter Line Number Which You Want 2 edit: ");
  lineNum = readNumber();

  while((ch=fgetc(fp))!=EOF) // fgetc returns int so ch should be int
  {
    if(ch=='\n')  // better to have {} here too
    {
      count++;
    }

    if(count==lineNum-1 && edited==0)   
    {
      if(lineNum==1)
      {
        fprintf(fc,"%d\n",score);
      }
      else // better to { } here too
      {
        fprintf(fc,"\n%d\n",score);
      }

      edited=1;  

      // i guess you want to remove old score
      while( (ch=fgetc(fp))!=EOF )  
      {                           
        if(ch=='\n')
        {
          break;
        }
      }
    }
    else // {} for avoiding future pitfall
    {
      fputc(ch,fc);
    }
  }

  fclose(fp);
  fclose(fc);

  if(edited==1)
  {
    puts("\nLine has been written successfully."); // puts() when u can

    int ch = 0; // int
    FILE *fs = NULL; 
    FILE *ft = NULL;

    fs = fopen(dest, "r");

    if( fs == NULL )
    {
      perror(dest);
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    ft = fopen(src, "w");

    if( ft == NULL )
    {
      perror(src);
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE); // at program exit files will close anyway
    }

    while( ( ch = fgetc(fs) ) != EOF )
    {
      fputc(ch,ft); 
    }

    fclose(fs);
    fclose(ft);

    printf("\nFile copied\n");
    getch();
  }
  else
  {
    printf("\nLine Not Found");
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
downvoter wanna comment why it is downvoted? –  CyberSpock Apr 11 '14 at 12:22
1  
I suspect the downvote was probably because this is just a code dump and there isn't any explanation. –  Will Apr 11 '14 at 12:24
1  
well as long as it helps the asker I don't give a damm –  CyberSpock Apr 11 '14 at 12:36
    
but @Will there is explanation in comments, and Claptrap mentioned it in his answer, I guess no body reads comments ...:( –  Mudassir Hussain Apr 11 '14 at 14:28
    
The OP had a specific intention when he wrote his code. At some point, he made a mistake, and was not able to locate it himself. Your answer did not show him the mistake, nor does it teach him how to locate such mistakes in the future. That is why code-only replies are frequently voted down on SO (as are code-only questions, and rightly so IMHO). It gives a man a fish, but does not teach him how to fish (better). As you expanded your answer, I withdraw my downvote. –  DevSolar Apr 11 '14 at 14:49

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