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I want to concatenate fields intersected part of the same table

id      user_id     user_ip
4       971         108.54.218.114
5       972         108.54.218.114
6       973         108.54.218.114
7       974         108.54.218.114
8       975         107.222.159.246
9       975         98.54.818.133

In the example above, we can see that the user with the IP address (108.54.218.114) address to create multiple accounts with the following account IDs (971, 972, 973, 974), but also that the user with the account ID (975) is connect from the following IP addresses (107.222.159.246, 98.54.818.133)

I want to format the results like this

user_id             user_ip
971,972,973,974     108.54.218.114
975                 107.222.159.246, 98.54.818.133

MySQL

SELECT 
    GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT users_log.user_id) AS ID_LOG, 
    GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT users_log.user_ip) AS IP_LOG
FROM users_log  
    GROUP BY users_log.user_id
ORDER BY users_log.user_id DESC

If anyone can help me?

Thank you in advance for your help

share|improve this question
1  
For sure you can do this, but usually you shouldn't even want to do this in sql. Relational Databases are designed to have atomic singular values in each cell. Grouping it like this should be done in your application logic. – wvdz Apr 11 '14 at 12:36
    
What would the output be if there was another record 10, 975, 108.54.218.114 – AgRizzo Apr 11 '14 at 12:36
    
@popovitsj I am forced to work with this structure – user3523663 Apr 11 '14 at 12:50
    
@AgRizzo it is unlikely! – user3523663 Apr 11 '14 at 12:50

There is another recent question (which I can't find) on SO very close to this. I asked about the intersecting row because of the (for lack of better term) recursiveness of this type of solution.

Here is SQL to give you your exact answer for that exact sample set.

SELECT user_id, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT user_ip) AS user_ip
FROM users_log
GROUP BY user_id
HAVING COUNT(*) >1
UNION
SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT user_id) AS user_id,  user_ip
FROM users_log
GROUP BY user_ip
HAVING COUNT(*) >1;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help How to handle duplicates? eg. id 975 (here : pastebin.com/tnHvVnvy) – user3523663 Apr 11 '14 at 15:08

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