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So, this is what I'm trying to do.

Any ideas how this could be achieved?

Let's say we have this :

class someClass
{
     string someVar;

     this(string v)
     {
          someVar=v;
     }

     void print()
     {
          writeln(someVar);
     }
}

In D, we could do something like :

someClass cl = new someClass("value");
cl.print();

How could we use someClass in C code?


P.S. If you're wondering what I'm trying to do.... I'm currently writing an interpreter in D, using Flex/Bison, so I need a way to interface my D object in the Bison parsing code...

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted
class SomeClass
{
     string someVar;

     this(string v)
     {
          someVar=v;
     }

     void print()
     {
          writeln(someVar);
     }
}

extern(C) void* newSomeClass(char *v) {
    return cast(void*)(new SomeClass(to!string(v))); // \0 terminated
}

extern(C) void SomeClass_print(SomeClass cls) {
    cls.print();
}

I think you get the idea, you have to make an extern(C) function for every method of your class. You might be able to automatically generate that code though (pretty straight forward). There are a few more problems GC related, but nothing you can't deal with, but it's kind of a pain.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, THAT looks interesting. Let me play a bit with the idea and I'll let you know how it goes... ;-) – Dr.Kameleon Apr 11 '14 at 13:01
    
Hmmm... tried something along these lines but DMD seems to be complaining : cannot implicitly convert expression (new SomeClass) of type someClass.SomeClass to void*... – Dr.Kameleon Apr 11 '14 at 13:07
1  
Yeah, forgot that you need to cast to void* explicitly (I update the post). – dav1d Apr 11 '14 at 13:09
    
Aye, another D user and I are actually working on automating this whole thing with SWIG, so the D side generates its extern(C) code, a .h file, and a SWIG interface file, which can then be used to autogenerate a reconstruction of the class in other languages. I don't think the code is available yet, the other person has been doing most the work after i started it – Adam D. Ruppe Apr 11 '14 at 13:34
    
This code won't work without initialising the D runtime ! – DejanLekic Apr 15 '14 at 7:41

You need to write functions in D that work with pointers to opaque types, and export them with C calling conventions. See http://dlang.org/interfaceToC.html. You need to watch out for garbage collection and whatnot. It's a pain.

For your purposes I suggest you look at a D-specific parser generator rather than using Bison. They are usually based on compile-time metaprogramming so you don't need a separate build step, which is an added plus.

You can also write the parser in C, output C structures and then translate those C structures to D structures in D. This seems easier as D makes it easy to use C APIs but not vice versa.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, flex and bison should be avoided in favor of something more modern because (by default) they're heavy users of globals. – Mike DeSimone Apr 11 '14 at 13:01
    
Well, I'm currently looking into it. As for Bison-alternatives (for D), I think you got a point there, but it happens I'm a bit too familiar with Bison to let it go that easily. :-) Also, have in mind that my parser's requirements are rather complex so using a not-that-mature version of parser work-in-progress would not be ideal... – Dr.Kameleon Apr 11 '14 at 13:04
    
@Dr.Kameleon I added an extra option to the answer in case you insist on using C-based tools. – Zoidberg Apr 11 '14 at 13:06
    
@rightfold To be honest, your latest suggestion was what I was about to do... – Dr.Kameleon Apr 11 '14 at 13:08

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