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Can someone demonstrate an example of a simple program where changing the access of one method from private to public in a working program will cause no compilation errors but only leads to the program behaving differently?

Also when will adding a new private method cause either compilation errors or lead to the program behaving differently?

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1  
And you are not trying this yourself because?? – TheLostMind Apr 11 '14 at 15:06
    
Smells like homework, can you show what you have tried so far? – Matthew Wilson Apr 11 '14 at 15:08
    
Note that it's quite frustrating when two questions are asked in one post, even if they are related. – Duncan Apr 11 '14 at 15:08
    
To all the "what have you tried" folks (@WhoAmI etc.) - to be fair, this is a tricky question. One in which you either "get it" and produce an answer or you start blankly at the page in confusion. What kind of work-in-progress were you expecting to see? – Duncan Apr 11 '14 at 15:11
    
@Duncan - If the question had - "I've tried this. But it doesn't work / it works but I don't know why", then I would not have posted that comment :) – TheLostMind Apr 12 '14 at 8:45
up vote 5 down vote accepted

This comes into play with inheritance. A subclass can have a method with the same signature as a private method in its parent class, but not override it.

public class Scratchpad {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Sub().doSomething();
    }
}

class Super {
    public void doSomething() {
        System.out.println(computeOutput());
    }

    private String computeOutput() {
        return "Foo";
    }
}

class Sub extends Super {
    public String computeOutput() {
        return "Bar";
    }
}

If you run this as-is, you get Foo. If you change Super#computeOutput() to public, you get Bar. That's because Sub#computeOutput() would now override Super#computeOutput().

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1  
+1 Great example. Should encourage people to make use of @Override. ;) – Bhesh Gurung Apr 11 '14 at 15:22

Also when will adding a new private method cause either compilation errors or lead to the program behaving differently?

Borrowing from Mark's code, if you add the private method to Sub, the following will not compile because the visibility of doSomething() has been reduced.

class Super {
  public void doSomething() {
    System.out.println("Foo");
  }
}

class Sub extends Super {      
  private void doSomething() {
    System.out.println("Harr!");
  }
}

Also when will adding a new private method cause either compilation errors or lead to the program behaving differently?

If the private method added is more specific that the previous one, you can adjust program behaviour. The example below prints "bar" unless you add (uncomment) the other method at which point it prints "foo".

public class Test {

  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    String foo = "hello";
    methodOne(foo);
  }

  // private static void methodOne(String args) {
  // System.out.println("foo");
  // }

  private static void methodOne(Object arg) {
    System.out.println("bar");
  }
}
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2  
Great example in the second case. And notably, this could also be used to answer the first question. If methodOne(Object) is public and some code is calling it, if you then make methodOne(String) public that code will call the more specific method without a compiler error (it would require a recompile however). – Mark Peters Apr 11 '14 at 15:32

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