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Consider this code (bits.c):

#include <assert.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <stdio.h>

static uint64_t pick_bits(unsigned char *bytes, size_t nbytes, int lo, int hi)
{
  assert(bytes != 0 && nbytes > 0 && nbytes <= 8);
  assert(lo >= 0 && lo < 64);
  assert(hi >= 0 && hi < 64 && hi >= lo);
  uint64_t result = 0;
  for (int i = nbytes - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    result = (result << 8) | bytes[i];
  result >>= lo;
  result &= (UINT64_C(1) << (hi - lo + 1)) - 1;
  return result;
}

int main(void)
{
  unsigned char d1[8] = "\xA5\xB4\xC3\xD2\xE1\xF0\x96\x87";
  for (int u = 0; u < 64; u += 4)
  {
    uint64_t v = pick_bits(d1, sizeof(d1), u, u+3);
    printf("Picking bits %2d..%2d gives 0x%" PRIX64 "\n", u, u+3, v);
  }
  return 0;
}

When compiled with stringent warnings (using GCC 4.8.2 built for an Ubuntu 12.04 derivative):

$ gcc -g -O3 -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -Wmissing-prototypes -Wstrict-prototypes \
>     -Wold-style-definition -Wold-style-declaration -Werror  bits.c -o bits
In file included from bits.c:1:0:
bits.c: In function ‘main’:
bits.c:9:35: error: assuming signed overflow does not occur when assuming that (X + c) < X is always false [-Werror=strict-overflow]
   assert(hi >= 0 && hi < 64 && hi >= lo);
                                   ^
cc1: all warnings being treated as errors

I'm puzzled: how is GCC complaining about an addition? There are no additions in that line (even when preprocessed)! The relevant section of the preprocessed output is:

# 4 "bits.c" 2

static uint64_t pick_bits(unsigned char *bytes, size_t nbytes, int lo, int hi)
{
  ((bytes != 0 && nbytes > 0 && nbytes <= 8) ? (void) (0) : __assert_fail ("bytes != 0 && nbytes > 0 && nbytes <= 8", "bits.c", 7, __PRETTY_FUNCTION__));
  ((lo >= 0 && lo < 64) ? (void) (0) : __assert_fail ("lo >= 0 && lo < 64", "bits.c", 8, __PRETTY_FUNCTION__));
  ((hi >= 0 && hi < 64 && hi >= lo) ? (void) (0) : __assert_fail ("hi >= 0 && hi < 64 && hi >= lo", "bits.c", 9, __PRETTY_FUNCTION__));
  uint64_t result = 0;
  for (int i = nbytes - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    result = (result << 8) | bytes[i];
  result >>= lo;
  result &= (1UL << (hi - lo + 1)) - 1;
  return result;
}

Clearly, I can add -Wno-strict-overflow to suppress that warning, but I don't understand why the warning is considered to apply to this code in the first place.

(I note that the error is reputedly In function ‘main’:, but that is because it is able to aggressively inline the code of the function into main.)


Further observations

Some observations triggered by the answers:

  • The problem occurs because of the inlining.
  • Removing the static is not sufficient to avoid the problem.
  • Compiling the function separately from main works.
  • Adding the __attribute__((noinline)) works too.
  • Using -O2 optimization avoids the issue, too.

Subsidiary question

This looks to me like dubious behaviour by the GCC compiler.

  • Is it worth reporting to the GCC team as a possible bug?

Assembler output

Command:

$ gcc -g -O3 -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -Wmissing-prototypes -Wstrict-prototypes \
> -Wold-style-definition -Wold-style-declaration -Werror -S \
> -Wno-strict-overflow bits.c
$

Assembler (top section):

    .file   "bits.c"
    .text
.Ltext0:
    .section    .rodata.str1.8,"aMS",@progbits,1
    .align 8
.LC0:
    .string "Picking bits %2d..%2d gives 0x%lX\n"
    .section    .text.startup,"ax",@progbits
    .p2align 4,,15
    .globl  main
    .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB8:
    .file 1 "bits.c"
    .loc 1 19 0
    .cfi_startproc
.LVL0:
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
.LBB8:
.LBB9:
    .loc 1 23 0
    movl    $3, %edx
.LBB10:
.LBB11:
    .loc 1 13 0
    movabsq $-8676482779388332891, %rbp
.LBE11:
.LBE10:
.LBE9:
.LBE8:
    .loc 1 19 0
    pushq   %rbx
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 24
    .cfi_offset 3, -24
.LBB22:
    .loc 1 21 0
    xorl    %ebx, %ebx
.LBE22:
    .loc 1 19 0
    subq    $8, %rsp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 32
    jmp .L2
.LVL1:
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L3:
    leal    3(%rbx), %edx
.LVL2:
.L2:
.LBB23:
.LBB20:
.LBB16:
.LBB12:
    .loc 1 13 0
    movl    %ebx, %ecx
    movq    %rbp, %rax
.LBE12:
.LBE16:
    .loc 1 24 0
    movl    %ebx, %esi
.LBB17:
.LBB13:
    .loc 1 13 0
    shrq    %cl, %rax
.LBE13:
.LBE17:
    .loc 1 24 0
    movl    $.LC0, %edi
.LBE20:
    .loc 1 21 0
    addl    $4, %ebx
.LVL3:
.LBB21:
.LBB18:
.LBB14:
    .loc 1 13 0
    movq    %rax, %rcx
.LBE14:
.LBE18:
    .loc 1 24 0
    xorl    %eax, %eax
.LBB19:
.LBB15:
    .loc 1 14 0
    andl    $15, %ecx
.LBE15:
.LBE19:
    .loc 1 24 0
    call    printf
.LVL4:
.LBE21:
    .loc 1 21 0
    cmpl    $64, %ebx
    jne .L3
.LBE23:
    .loc 1 27 0
    addq    $8, %rsp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 24
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    popq    %rbx
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
.LVL5:
    popq    %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE8:
    .size   main, .-main
    .text
...
share|improve this question
    
Can you share the generated assembly, too? –  Carl Norum Apr 11 '14 at 18:42
    
Compiling this under clang, I get no warnings or errors. –  mah Apr 11 '14 at 18:42
    
"Is it worth reporting to the GCC team as a possible bug?", what do you consider as a bug? GCC gives an error because you asked for all warnings to be considered as errors. It warns because it is generating code which assumes no overflow takes place. There is a way to disable that warning if you don't want it. –  AProgrammer Apr 11 '14 at 19:23
    
Alternative: assert(hi >= 0 && hi < 64); assert(lo >= 0 && lo <= hi);. I do not think the issue is about u+3, but that the 2 asserts have 5 tests when 4 would do. –  chux Apr 11 '14 at 19:24
    
@AProgrammer: what I think is an error is that GCC hasn't noticed that the overflow cannot occur because the values are so constrained that even if the arithmetic were performed using int8_t, the addition of 3 would never overflow lo + 3. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 11 '14 at 19:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's inlining the function, and then generating the error. You can see for yourself:

__attribute__((noinline))
static uint64_t pick_bits(unsigned char *bytes, size_t nbytes, int lo, int hi)

On my system, the original version generates the same warning, but the noinline version does not.

GCC then optimizes out hi >= lo, because it's really u+3 >= u, and generates a warning because it's not good enough at figuring out that u+3 doesn't overflow. A shame.

Documentation

From the GCC documentation, section 3.8:

An optimization that assumes that signed overflow does not occur is perfectly safe if the values of the variables involved are such that overflow never does, in fact, occur. Therefore this warning can easily give a false positive: a warning about code that is not actually a problem. To help focus on important issues, several warning levels are defined. No warnings are issued for the use of undefined signed overflow when estimating how many iterations a loop requires, in particular when determining whether a loop will be executed at all.

Emphasis added. My personal recommendation is to use -Wno-error=strict-overflow, or to use a #pragma to disable the warning in the offending code.

share|improve this answer
    
Removing the static is not sufficient. Compiling the function separately from main works, and adding the __attribute__((noinline)) works too. Using -O2 optimization avoids the issue, too. Subsidiary question: is it worth reporting to the GCC team as a bug? –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 11 '14 at 18:57
    
The worst that will happen is that they will tell you that false positives are inevitable, and you should ignore it or turn it off. The fact that this warning is often a false positive is written right into the GCC docs. I lean towards turning the warning off, selectively. Static analysis is hard. –  Dietrich Epp Apr 11 '14 at 20:16

My assumption is that gcc is inlining pick_bits and thus compiling with the knowledge that hi == lo+3 which allows it to assume that hi >= lo is always true as long as lo is low enough that lo+3 doesn't overflow.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, this was my intuition, too. I'd guess aggressive inlining is included with -O3. –  Carl Norum Apr 11 '14 at 18:44
3  
Technically, it's allowed to assume that lo+3 doesn't overflow because the C standard says so. Even if lo = INT_MAX. –  Dietrich Epp Apr 11 '14 at 18:50
    
@DietrichEpp, Agreed, gcc probably warns that the code assume no overflow, and the user asked gcc to consider all warnings as errors. –  AProgrammer Apr 11 '14 at 19:19

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