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I have a tbl_df where I want to group_by(u,v) for each distinct integer combination observed with (u,v).

a) I then want to assign each distinct group some arbitrary distinct number label=1,2,3... e.g. the combination (u,v)==(2,3) could get label 1, (1,3) could get 2, and so on. How to do this with one mutate(), without a three-step summarize-and-self-join?

dplyr has a neat function n(), but that gives the number of elements within its group, not the overall number of the group. In data.table this would simply be called .GRP.

b) Actually what I really want to assign a string/character label ('A','B',...). But numbering groups by integers is good-enough, because I can then use integer_to_label(i) as below. Unless there's a clever way to merge these two? But don't sweat this part.

set.seed(1234)

# Helper fn for mapping integer 1..26 to character label
integer_to_label <- function(i) { substr("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ",i,i) }

df <- tbl_df(data.frame(u=sample.int(3,10,replace=T), v=sample.int(4,10,replace=T)))

# Want to label/number each distinct group of unique (u,v) combinations
df %>% group_by(u,v) %>% mutate(label = n()) # WRONG: n() is number of element within its group, not overall number of group

   u v
1  2 3
2  1 3
3  1 2
4  2 3
5  1 2
6  3 3
7  1 3
8  1 2
9  3 1
10 3 4

KLUDGE 1: could do df %>% group_by(u,v) %.% summarize(label = n()) , then self-join
share|improve this question
    
@Randy-Lai and I both solved it, separately. Randy's is a cleaner idiom that lends itself to multiple mutate/summarize(...) actions. I found interaction(u,v, drop=T) –  smci Apr 12 '14 at 23:30
    
What do you need this for? –  hadley Apr 14 '14 at 23:11
    
@hadley: my particular reason is as stated in the question: I want to assign each distinct (u,v)-group some arbitrary (ordered) numbering=1,2,3... so I can ultimately assign them string labels 'A','B','C'... (my purpose is to subsequently refer to them by shorthand, in modeling and graphing) –  smci Nov 18 '14 at 22:49
    
@hadley: but in general this is a useful feature, and data.table package implements .GRP for this. Any chance we can have something in dplyr please? :) –  smci Nov 18 '14 at 22:51
2  
next version will have group_indices() –  hadley Nov 19 '14 at 15:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Updated answer

get_group_number = function(){
    i = 0
    function(){
        i <<- i+1
        i
    }
}
group_number = get_group_number()
df %.% group_by(u,v) %.% mutate(label = group_number())

You can also consider the following slightly unreadable version

group_number = (function(){i = 0; function() i <<- i+1 })()
df %.% group_by(u,v) %.% mutate(label = group_number())

using iterators package

library(iterators)

counter = icount()
df %.% group_by(u,v) %.% mutate(label = nextElem(counter))
share|improve this answer
    
No, this is wrong. I'm not looking for the row-number within a group. I'm looking for the group-number (the equivalent of data.table .GRP). Since we have 7 unique combinations of (u,v) in this example, the output labels should be 1:7 (in some arbitrary order) –  smci Apr 12 '14 at 5:29
1  
Sorry, I didn't pay much attention to your question. I have updated the answer with a dirty solution... –  Randy Lai Apr 12 '14 at 5:35
    
not bad but that's essentially just a generator function that returns incrementing integers... surely we can obviate it? –  smci Apr 12 '14 at 5:39
    
I am not sure if dplyr has a similar built-in counter function... –  Randy Lai Apr 12 '14 at 5:53
1  
you remind me of iterators package. I have never used it before. (And see the updated solution). But it is essentially equivalent to my original method. –  Randy Lai Apr 12 '14 at 7:32

dplyr has a group_indices() function that you can use like this:

df %>% 
    mutate(label = group_indices_(df, .dots=c("u", "v"))) %>% 
    group_by(label) ...
share|improve this answer
    
Neat. New in 0.4.0 (1/2015) –  smci Mar 16 at 13:35
    
Sweet. Thanks for pointing out this new function - hand't seen it yet! –  Jordan Jun 22 at 16:47

Updating my answer with three different ways:

A) A neat non-dplyr solution using interaction(u,v):

> df$label <- factor(interaction(df$u,df$v, drop=T))
 [1] 1.3 2.3 2.2 2.4 3.2 2.4 1.2 1.2 2.1 2.1
 Levels: 2.1 1.2 2.2 3.2 1.3 2.3 2.4

> match(df$label, levels(df$label)[ rank(unique(df$label)) ] )
 [1] 1 2 3 4 5 4 6 6 7 7

B) Making Randy's neat fast-and-dirty generator-function answer more compact:

get_next_integer = function(){
  i = 0
  function(u,v){ i <<- i+1 }
}
get_integer = get_next_integer() 

df %.% group_by(u,v) %.% mutate(label = get_integer())

C) Also here is a one-liner using a generator function abusing a global variable assignment from this:

i <- 0
generate_integer <- function() { return(assign('i', i+1, envir = .GlobalEnv)) }

df %.% group_by(u,v) %.% mutate(label = generate_integer())

rm(i)
share|improve this answer
    
The reason that I used get_group_name is to avoid using global variable. I think it is in general not a good idea to change global variables inside a function...but it works anyway. –  Randy Lai Apr 12 '14 at 6:20
    
I compacted yours and put it at the top of my answer. An assignment evaluates to its LHS value, hence we can simply say function(u,v){ i <<- i+1 } –  smci Apr 12 '14 at 6:45
    
I also found a neat three-liner non-dplyr way with interaction(u,v), and added that at top. –  smci Apr 12 '14 at 7:24
    
I also solved the incremental-order issue with interaction(... drop=T) per this subquestion –  smci Apr 12 '14 at 9:23

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