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I'm trying to write a function that will fill a matrix of dimensions (n x n) with numbers that are drawn from a random exponential sample.

Some other caveats-
1) I need the numbers in the matrix to be integers. 2) I need the diagonals to be 0s.

This is what I've tried among other things:

myfun <- function(n, p){
  x=rexp((n*n),p)
  x=as.integer(x)
  z=matrix(data=x,nrow=n,ncol=n)
  diag(z) <- 0
}

The code is a bit of a hack. The reason I have two steps before putting the numbers in the matrix rather than just doing it immediately is because this is how I worked out to make them integers. i.e. make the numbers integers before putting them in the matrix.

This code works perfectly fine for me if it is not contained within a function and I replace 'n' and 'p' with the desired number of rows/columns for n and the desired probability distribution for p, then it works well.

My issue is trying to put it into a function such that I can redo the same code for any 'n' or 'p' that I desire. I'd like to have one function that I could use repeatedly for a range of 'n's' and 'p's'.

hope this is clear.

asked for example

e.g. for a 12 x 12 matrix.

x=rexp(144,1/25) #get random numbers from an exponential distribution
x=as.integer(x) #make them integers
z <- matrix(data=x,nrow=12,ncol=12) #coerce into a matrix
diag(z) <- 0 # make diagonal 0
z #output


   [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10] [,11] [,12]
 [1,]    0   62    4   14    3   60   56   16   20    11    21    11
 [2,]   18    0   11   14   14   31    5    5    5     6     2    73
 [3,]    6   42    0   40    7    0    4    0    3     5    23     0
 [4,]   11   40   78    0   37   44   12    2   13    68    17    35
 [5,]   60    1   23    2    0   10   31    0    2    14    19    10
 [6,]    3    6   24   30   17    0    2   44   17    14     7    19
 [7,]    4   16    9   64   37   22    0   14    4    85    17    10
 [8,]    7   19   35   14   11   32   26    0    6    17    80    29
 [9,]   55   11   18   14   47    6   28   16    0    11    23     7
[10,]   17   38   44    6   19   15   31    7   11     0    13    68
[11,]   19    2    4  173    3    3    2   32   35    29     0    10
[12,]   24   94   27   22   17    3   20    2    5    34    12     0

Sample output given above. When the code is written like that it works perfectly.

My issue is with trying to get that into a function, where I can state 'n' and 'p' to produce many other matrices without having to run lines of code.

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Post an example of input and desired output. And please address why these would be considered "exponetially distributed" if you have coerced them to integer? –  BondedDust Apr 12 at 5:04
    
Have you looked at this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/9282258/… –  Nathaniel Payne Apr 12 at 5:08
    
yes, I have looked at that, but I don't see how it relates as it is filling the matrix with the random numbers (which contain decimals) whereas I'm trying to make a set of integers to put into a matrix thereafter. –  jalapic Apr 12 at 5:10
    
@BondedDust Rounding or truncating to integers will still yield an approximately exponential distribution for any decent-sized sample set. –  Carl Witthoft Apr 12 at 12:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe I'm missing something... but I think you can just add return(z) to the end of your function, and it will work.

myfun <- function(n, p){
  x=rexp((n*n),p)
  x=as.integer(x)
  z=matrix(data=x,nrow=n,ncol=n)
  diag(z) <- 0
  return(z)
}

myfun(12,1/25)
#       [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10] [,11] [,12]
#  [1,]    0    8    5   30   37    5   14   27   43    53    56    21
#  [2,]   67    0    2   21    8    0   80   36    9    41     1    40
# ....

If you want to generate a list of such matrices, you can use mapply. This would get you two matrices:

mapply(myfun,n=c(12,13),p=c(1/25,1/24))
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