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Given below is the code for reading values from a file and plotting them. I am reading about 36000 values. I am using matplotlib to plot them. If the values are below a certain threshold I am deleting and rotating the grid that I have made for the plot.

def readdata():
    global mul
    global fig
    global S
    global flag
    global k
    global line_number
    global readcount
    global angle_deviate
    global true_counter
    global fail_flag
    global loop_count
    global ts
    global xlist
    global ylist
    while k<S:
        line_number=line_number+1
        line=linecache.getline("data.txt", line_number)
        if line_number==1:
            x=float(line)*math.cos(0)
            y=float(line)*math.sin(0)
            xlist.append(300+x)
            ylist.append(300+y)
        else:
            x=float(line)*math.cos((readcount-1)*mul/samp_rate)
            y=float(line)*math.sin((readcount-1)*mul/samp_rate)
            xlist.append(300+x)
            ylist.append(300+y)
        plt.plot(xlist, ylist, lw=1, color='#ee8d18')
        if true_counter <(samp_rate*t[k]): #true counter to determine if the stage is complete or not
            if k<S-1 and k!=S-1:
                if p[k]<float(line):
                    true_counter=true_counter+1
                    fail_flag=1
                    point=plt.plot(300+x, 300+y, '.', markersize=3, color='#ee8d18')
                    loop_count+=1
                    pts.append(point)
                    readcount+=1
                    plt.pause(0.1) #first pause in plotting for 0.1 seconds
                    continue
                else:
                    readcount+=1
                    true_counter=0
                    point=plt.plot(300+x, 300+y, '.', markersize=3, color='#ee8d18')
                    loop_count+=1
                    pts.append(point)
                    plt.pause(0.1) #first pause in plotting for 0.1 seconds
                    deleteplot(k, fail_flag, loop_count)
            if k==S-1:
                if p[k]<float(line):
                    readcount+=1
                    true_counter=true_counter+1
                    x=float(line)*math.cos((readcount-1)*mul/samp_rate)
                    y=float(line)*math.sin((readcount-1)*mul/samp_rate)
                    point=plt.plot(300+x, 300+y, '.', markersize=3, color='#ee8d18')
                    loop_count+=1
                    pts.append(point)
                    plt.pause(0.1) #first pause in plotting for 0.1 seconds
                    continue
                else:
                    readcount+=1
                    true_counter=0
                    point=plt.plot(300+x, 300+y, '.', markersize=3, color='#ee8d18')
                    loop_count+=1
                    pts.append(point)
                    plt.pause(0.1) #first pause in plotting for 0.1 seconds
                    deleteplot(k, fail_flag, loop_count)
        else:
            true_counter=0
            k+=1
            fail_flag=0
            line_number=line_number-1
            loop_count=0
            i=0
            while i<S+1:
                cumulative_theta[i]=rotate_theta[i]
                i+=1

The problem is that this code uses memory like anything. It startsfrom 30MB and goes upto 260-300 MB in an hour or so. How do I reduce the memory usage? What else can I do to reduce the load on CPU and the memory outage?

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1  
This question appears to be off-topic because it belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com –  jonrsharpe Apr 12 at 9:46
    
On the first look, it could relate to the repeating plot statements. For updating plots do something like hh = plt.plot(x,y) for initial drawing and hh[0].set_daty(x1,y1) for updating the line. –  Dietrich Apr 12 at 12:16
    
@Dietrich what does pyplot() do exactly? Does it point all the points again? Or does it store the location of the points? –  Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Apr 13 at 4:15
    
plt.plot() paints the points passed to it - all existing points are kept in the existing (sub-)plot. set_data() (not set_daty, sorry) replaces the existing data of a line. So you do get quite a bit of overhead, if for each point you draw, you generate a new line object wit plot(). Try plt.gca().get_children() to find out how many line objects exist in your plot. –  Dietrich Apr 13 at 8:42
    
I would start by getting rid of all the globals... –  tcaswell Apr 13 at 19:01

1 Answer 1

I suspect you want something like this:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

# make figure + axes
fig, ax = plt.subplots(1, 1)
# make base line
ln, = ax.plot([], [], 'r')
for j in range(50):
      # get current data
      x_data = list(ln.get_xdata())
      y_data = list(ln.get_ydata())
      # append new data, or do what ever you want to it

      x_data.append(j)
      y_data.append(j * j)
      # to keep just last n points, x_data = x_data[-n:]
      # set data of existing line
      ln.set_xdata(x_data)
      ln.set_ydata(y_data)
      # auto-scale the view limits
      ax.relim()
      ax.autoscale()
      # force the canvas to redraw
      plt.draw()
      # pause to give the gui time to refresh
      plt.pause(.1)

which will not create any new objects in the inner loop, just update existing objects.

I would also look into the animation module examples.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the answer. I'll try this ASAP. I did look into the animation module. The thing is I have only seen 1 object to be animated in all those examples, here I want to animate more than one things. Have not found any example in the documentation showing this. Do you know where I can find such an example? –  Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Apr 14 at 3:26
    
Okay so I did try it, ummm, the memory is increasing in the same way, at the same rate. What else can I do? –  Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Apr 14 at 3:31
    
write the simplest example that will reproduce this problem and edit your question to show that code. Aside from that the best I can do is guess. –  tcaswell Apr 14 at 12:15
    
Okay, I'll try. –  Prakhar Mohan Srivastava Apr 14 at 12:20

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