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I am getting and calculating some basic order information in my SQL query. I have it working as it should but have been reading about the GROUP BY SQL Clause. I am wondering if the following SQL statement would benefit from GROUP BY and if it would be more efficient to use it? Thanks!

SELECT orders.billerID, 
orders.invoiceDate, 
orders.txnID, 
orders.bName, 
orders.bStreet1, 
orders.bStreet2, 
orders.bCity, 
orders.bState, 
orders.bZip, 
orders.bCountry, 
orders.sName, 
orders.sStreet1, 
orders.sStreet2, 
orders.sCity, 
orders.sState, 
orders.sZip, 
orders.sCountry, 
orders.paymentType, 
orders.invoiceNotes, 
orders.pFee, 
orders.shipping, 
orders.tax, 
orders.reasonCode, 
orders.txnType, 
orders.customerID, 
customers.firstName AS firstName, 
customers.lastName AS lastName, 
customers.businessName AS businessName, 
orderStatus.statusName AS orderStatus, 
(IFNULL(SUM((orderItems.itemPrice * orderItems.itemQuantity)), 0.00) + orders.shipping + orders.tax) AS orderTotal, 
((IFNULL(SUM((orderItems.itemPrice * orderItems.itemQuantity)), 0.00) + orders.shipping + orders.tax) - (SELECT IFNULL(SUM(payments.amount), 0.00) FROM payments WHERE payments.orderID = orders.id)) AS orderBalance 
FROM orders 
LEFT JOIN customers ON orders.customerID = customers.id 
LEFT JOIN orderStatus ON orders.orderStatus = orderStatus.id
LEFT JOIN orderItems ON orderItems.orderID = orders.id 
LEFT JOIN payments ON payments.orderID = orders.id
share|improve this question
2  
Have you considered normalizing your database? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Database_normalization –  Mark Byers Feb 20 '10 at 19:12
    
Another way to make the query much more efficient is to use INNER JOIN s instead of LEFT JOIN . In your case you an probably do an INNER JOIN with the customers table if you always expect orders to have a valid customer. –  smaclell Feb 20 '10 at 19:19
    
@Mark - I have normalized the database. Are you seeing something I am not? @smaclell - Thanks for that. I guess I was just worried that if the user deleted the customer, the order wouldn't show. Am I correct in saying that? –  Jesse Bunch Feb 20 '10 at 19:22
1  
@Jessa: How about an 'Address' table with 'ShippingAddress' and 'BillingAddress' columns on 'Order' being foreign keys to this table? Currently if the two addresses are same, I guess you just duplicate the data? –  Mark Byers Feb 20 '10 at 19:28
    
that is correct, if you have deleted customers the orders would not show. If that is a scenario you want to handle you might want to do it by providing a method to 'archive' customers instead of deleting their information completely. Either way the query as it is now with the LEFT JOIN would work just fine. –  smaclell Feb 20 '10 at 19:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

GROUP BY would probably allow the SQL engine to better optimize your query but would make it harder to read due to the large number of grouping parameters.

Another option as recommended by the SQL Team is to consider using Sub queries. This can often make the GROUP BY statements much simpler and makes the overall query much easier to read.

Using a Sub query:

SELECT orders.billerID, 
    orders.invoiceDate, 
    orders.txnID, 
    orders.bName, 
    orders.bStreet1, 
    orders.bStreet2, 
    orders.bCity, 
    orders.bState, 
    orders.bZip, 
    orders.bCountry, 
    orders.sName, 
    orders.sStreet1, 
    orders.sStreet2, 
    orders.sCity, 
    orders.sState, 
    orders.sZip, 
    orders.sCountry, 
    orders.paymentType, 
    orders.invoiceNotes, 
    orders.pFee, 
    orders.shipping, 
    orders.tax, 
    orders.reasonCode, 
    orders.txnType, 
    orders.customerID, 
    customers.firstName AS firstName, 
    customers.lastName AS lastName, 
    customers.businessName AS businessName, 
    orderStatus.statusName AS orderStatus, 
    orderItem.fees + orders.shipping + orders.tax AS orderTotal, 
    orderItem.fees + orders.shipping + orders.tax - payments.amount AS orderBalance 
FROM orders 
LEFT JOIN customers ON orders.customerID = customers.id 
LEFT JOIN orderStatus ON orders.orderStatus = orderStatus.id
LEFT JOIN 
    ( 
      SELECT orderID, SUM(itemPrice * itemQuantity) as fees
      FROM orderItems
      GROUP BY orderID
    ) orderItems ON orderItems.orderID = orders.id 
LEFT JOIN 
    ( 
      SELECT orderID, SUM(amount) as amount
      FROM payments
      GROUP BY orderID
    ) payments ON payments.orderID = orders.id

Using a GROUP BY:

SELECT orders.billerID, 
    orders.invoiceDate, 
    orders.txnID, 
    orders.bName, 
    orders.bStreet1, 
    orders.bStreet2, 
    orders.bCity, 
    orders.bState, 
    orders.bZip, 
    orders.bCountry, 
    orders.sName, 
    orders.sStreet1, 
    orders.sStreet2, 
    orders.sCity, 
    orders.sState, 
    orders.sZip, 
    orders.sCountry, 
    orders.paymentType, 
    orders.invoiceNotes, 
    orders.pFee, 
    orders.shipping, 
    orders.tax, 
    orders.reasonCode, 
    orders.txnType, 
    orders.customerID, 
    customers.firstName AS firstName, 
    customers.lastName AS lastName, 
    customers.businessName AS businessName, 
    orderStatus.statusName AS orderStatus, 
    SUM(orderItems.itemPrice * orderItems.itemQuantity) + orders.shipping + orders.tax AS orderTotal, 
    SUM(orderItems.itemPrice * orderItems.itemQuantity) + orders.shipping + orders.tax - SUM(payments.amount) AS orderBalance 
FROM orders 
LEFT JOIN customers ON orders.customerID = customers.id 
LEFT JOIN orderStatus ON orders.orderStatus = orderStatus.id
LEFT JOIN orderItems ON orderItems.orderID = orders.id 
LEFT JOIN payments ON payments.orderID = orders.id
GROUP BY 
    orders.billerID, 
    orders.invoiceDate, 
    orders.txnID, 
    orders.bName, 
    orders.bStreet1, 
    orders.bStreet2, 
    orders.bCity, 
    orders.bState, 
    orders.bZip, 
    orders.bCountry, 
    orders.sName, 
    orders.sStreet1, 
    orders.sStreet2, 
    orders.sCity, 
    orders.sState, 
    orders.sZip, 
    orders.sCountry, 
    orders.paymentType, 
    orders.invoiceNotes, 
    orders.pFee, 
    orders.shipping, 
    orders.tax, 
    orders.reasonCode, 
    orders.txnType, 
    orders.customerID, 
    customers.firstName, 
    customers.lastName, 
    customers.businessName, 
    orderStatus.statusName  

GROUP BY Explained:

You can thing of GROUP BY as collecting records together that have similar data. For my example I am going to use a simple produce table with Category, Name and Price columns. If I group the data by Category I can aggregate ( i.e. SUM, COUNT, MIN, MAX, etc.) based on any of the other columns. Since I am grouping by the Category column the resulting records will have a unique value for Category. Any of the other columns might be return different value and therefore cannot be included in the select statement.

Name, Category, Price
Green Peppers, Peppers, 1.50
Orange Peppers, Peppers, 2.50
Yellow Peppers, Peppers, 2.50
Lemons, Citrus, 1.00
Oranges, Citrus, 1.00
Limes, Citrus, 1.00

SELECT 
    Category, /* This is unique because it is in the GROUP BY clause */
    AVG(Price) AS AveragePrice,
    MAX(Price) AS MaxPrice,
    MIN(Price) AS MinPrice
    /* , Name */  /* This is invalid because it is not in the GROUP BY clause */
                  /* The values are not unique so SQL does not know what to return */
FROM Produce
GROUP BY Category
share|improve this answer
    
I have edited the query with your advice. Is this what you mean? –  Jesse Bunch Feb 20 '10 at 19:13
    
No I meant something like this SELECT * FROM ( SELECT * FROM orders) x Where sub query x can almost any select statement. After thinking about it I decided to leave out the Sub Select example because it normally not the correct way to do things. –  smaclell Feb 20 '10 at 19:17
    
Ok. So I don't understand why we need such a large list of Group By parameters? This group by thing has my head spinning...Thanks for any explanation. –  Jesse Bunch Feb 20 '10 at 19:23
    
Okay! I am having trouble fitting in an example into a comment but I will give it a shot. When you do a GROUP BY if you want to return a single column you need to add it to the list of grouping parameters. Since you are grouping records together there might be multiple values for a single column. –  smaclell Feb 20 '10 at 19:40
1  
There's no null check on orderItem.fees. Because of the LEFT JOIN, the orderItem.fees could be NULL & cause problems with the math involved with calculating the orderTotal and orderBalance columns. Additionally, without knowing more about the data model - it's fine to leave as-is with regards to LEFT JOINs. But realistically CUSTOMERS and ORDERSTATUS probably aren't optional so they could be [INNER] JOINs. –  OMG Ponies Feb 20 '10 at 23:22

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