Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Per the subject line I am trying to return an int array length n containing the first n digits of pi.

So MakePi(3) --> {3, 1, 4}

I know I need to get pi and it gets stored as a double. I need to convert the double to a char so that I can search through the array to find each char, n in length. Then convert it back to an int array.

I am having issues on where to go from here. I know there is a loop but I can't get my brain to figure out exactly what I need to do. Thanks!

public int[] MakePie(int n)
      {
        double pi = Math.PI;
        char newPi = Convert.ToChar(pi);
        char[] newArray = new char[n];
        newArray[0] = newPi;
        int numbers = Convert.ToInt32(pi);

        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {


        }
        return newArray;

    }
share|improve this question
1  
Clue: ToString() then ToCharArray() – ClickRick Apr 12 '14 at 16:53
2  
Please note that basing your method on Math.PI will not give you more precision than double. For example, you cannot retrieve the 877th digit this way; a double has only 15–17 digits of precision. – Ruud v A Apr 12 '14 at 17:01
    
I am not sure why you feel that it is necessary to convert it to a string. See my answer for a solution that skips the string entirely. – merlin2011 Apr 12 '14 at 17:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

try this: it will also get rid of the decimal.

public static int[] MakePie(int n)
  {
    double pi = Math.PI;
    var str = pi.ToString().Remove(1, 1);
    var chararray = str.ToCharArray();
    var numbers = new int[n];

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {

        numbers[i] = int.Parse(chararray[i].ToString());
    }
    return numbers;

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is perfect! Thanks. I skipped the "var chararray" step though and this and it worked great. During the loop I did int.parse(str[i].ToString()) and it worked great. – mortey Apr 12 '14 at 19:53

Edited to return array of int

var res = pi.ToString().Where(x => x != '.').Take(n).Select(x => (int)char.GetNumericValue(x)).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Neat and compact solution – Peter Smith Apr 12 '14 at 17:04
    
The result this gives me, 3 / -1 / 1 / 4 / ..., is bogus. Not everyone uses . as a decimal separator. – hvd Apr 12 '14 at 17:08
    
@hvd The question is about Math.PI. It is very, very , very simple to pass the decimal char as parameter for a method containing the above code. – user3185569 Apr 12 '14 at 17:09
    
Sure, but even though it is so simple, you didn't, and as a result, there are a lot of systems where your code doesn't do what you claim it does. I'm not claiming you're in any way required to answer with 100% strictly correct code, but if it isn't, and it doesn't work on the system of someone reading your answer, expect to get called on it. – hvd Apr 12 '14 at 17:17

Here is a solution that does not require a string conversion, since your ultimate goal was to return an int[].

 public int[] MakePie(int n){
    double pi = Math.PI;
    int[] result = new int[n];
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        result[i] = (int) Math.Floor(pi);
        pi -= result[i];
        pi *= 10;
    }
    return result;
 }
share|improve this answer
private int[] getPiVal()
        {
            string pi = Math.PI + "";
            int[] piarray = new int[3];
            for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
            {
                piarray[i] = Convert.ToInt32(pi[i] + "");
            }
            return piarray;
        }
share|improve this answer

My strategy was to get each digit I wanted in the units position by multiplying PI by the relevant power of ten, and then getting the result of that number mod 10.

public int[] MakePi(int n)
{
    int[] result = new int[n]; 
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        result[i] = (int)(Math.PI * Math.Pow(10, i)) % 10;
    }
    return result; 
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.