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I have a database that contains audit tables. These audit tables contain copies of records from the main tables, copied in from triggers, and I need to create a sort of point-in-time report from these audit records.

The tables each have an updated_at column which is the timestamp of when the record was inserted - mix this with an id column or something and we can pinpoint a specific record (I mention this because the id columns cannot be unique in these tables).

What I need to do is pull records with some column filters, then get only the "most recent" version of those records (so, typically a MAX(updated_at) type return set). Then, I need to join 3 other audit tables and grab the related records from those - but the "most recent" records as well (the last table, audit_products I use to grab a COUNT() of the number of products associated to the related record)... but only up to the updated_at that gets returned from the initial part of the query - therein lies my problem.

This is the query (that doesn't work) that I would like to run... theoretically:

SELECT gr.id, gr.title_e, gr.title_f, wp.updated_at, wp.to_epmd_orig, wp.to_epmd_revise, wp.to_epmd_actual, lc.code_e, lc.code_f, pr.total
  FROM (
     SELECT fw.id, fw.group_id, fw.updated_at, fw.to_epmd_orig, fw.to_epmd_revise, fw.to_epmd_actual, fw.to_epmd_late_code
       FROM audit_pc_pub_workplans AS fw
      RIGHT JOIN (
         SELECT id, MAX(updated_at) AS updated_at
           FROM audit_pc_pub_workplans
          WHERE completed = 1 AND DATE(to_epmd_actual) BETWEEN '2013-04-01' AND '2014-03-31'
          GROUP BY id
      ) AS aw ON (aw.id = fw.id AND aw.updated_at = fw.updated_at)
  ) as wp
  LEFT JOIN (
     SELECT fg.id, fg.updated_at, fg.title_e, fg.title_f
       FROM audit_groups AS fg
      RIGHT JOIN (
         SELECT id, MAX(updated_at) AS updated_at
           FROM audit_groups
          WHERE updated_at <= wp.updated_at AND del_date IS NULL
          GROUP BY id
      ) AS ag ON (ag.id = fg.id AND ag.updated_at = fg.updated_at)
  ) AS gr ON (gr.id = wp.group_id)
  LEFT JOIN (
     SELECT fc.id, fc.code_e, fc.code_f
       FROM audit_wp_late_codes AS fc
      RIGHT JOIN (
         SELECT id, MAX(updated_at) AS updated_at
           FROM audit_wp_late_codes
          WHERE updated_at <= wp.updated_at AND delete_date IS NULL
          GROUP BY id
      ) AS ac ON (ac.id = fc.id AND ac.updated_at = fc.updated_at)
  ) AS lc ON (lc.id = wp.to_epmd_late_code)
  LEFT JOIN (
     SELECT fp.prod_group, COUNT(DISTINCT fp.id) AS total
       FROM audit_products AS fp
      RIGHT JOIN (
         SELECT id, MAX(updated_at) AS updated_at
           FROM audit_products
          WHERE updated_at <= wp.updated_at AND del_date_2 IS NULL
          GROUP BY id
      ) AS ap ON (ap.id = fp.id AND ap.updated_at = fp.updated_at)
      GROUP BY fp.prod_group
  ) AS pr ON (pr.prod_group = gr.id)
ORDER BY gr.title_e ASC
;

For the sake of completeness, I've left all column names in there as-is, but as outsiders you can ignore some of them obviously. The key ones are really the id type columns which are used in the ON () statements mostly, and the updated_at columns that all the tables have.

The problem is specifically my reference to wp.updated_at in all of the sub-sub queries in the LEFT JOINs. I read up and found that I can use a key word LATERAL when doing a join which is supposed to allow me to expose the wp table, and it does in fact let me run the query... but when I run that query (by the way, audit_products table has about 8M records), I give up after 2hrs of waiting.

Is there any way that this query can be rewritten to work within a reasonable amount of time? I'd even accept 15-30 minutes to run... just not hours.

Any help would be appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
Well, the use of DATE(to_epmd_actual) is causing it to ignore (relevant portions of) indices on that column. Use to_epmd_actual >= '2013-04-01' AND to_epmd_actual < '2014-04-01' (see this blog for why). It'd be good to get some sample data/desired results, but this should be simplifiable, yeah - that'll help knowing what's required and what can be removed (I'm a bit suspicious of the use of RIGHT JOINs in this situation). –  Clockwork-Muse Apr 12 '14 at 23:54
    
Yes, the use of DATE() cast the field so that i could specify just a date without a time. The delay in doing that is minimal so I'm not worried about that. The RIGHT JOIN was intentional, though really should be an INNER JOIN... again though, i don't believe they are causing the real slowdown. –  Eli Sand Apr 14 '14 at 15:16

1 Answer 1

Firstly, I don't think you need outer joins in your query. Secondly, consider using the OLAP function ROW_NUMBER() to retrieve the latest records -- it usually works faster than aggregation. Something like:

SELECT gr.id, gr.title_e, ...
  FROM (
     SELECT fw.id, ... fw.to_epmd_late_code, 
            ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY id ORDER BY updated_at DESC) rn
       FROM audit_pc_pub_workplans 
       WHERE completed = 1 AND DATE(to_epmd_actual) BETWEEN '2013-04-01' AND '2014-03-31'
  ) as wp
  INNER JOIN LATERAL (
     SELECT fg.id, fg.updated_at, fg.title_e, fg.title_f,
            ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY id ORDER BY updated_at DESC)
       FROM audit_groups
       WHERE updated_at <= wp.updated_at and wp.rn = 1 AND del_date IS NULL
  ) AS gr ON (gr.id = wp.group_id)
  ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for that syntax example. I have something working with all but the audit_products table, as i need to do an aggregate count on that and i can't figure out a way to do so without involving a sub-sub query. As soon as that happens, the query takes forever to run. –  Eli Sand Apr 14 '14 at 15:19

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