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I would like to ask about the getpeername() function since it returns data as the title states. I tried to get value directly from accept() function, and the result also happens the same. Value of port seems to appear randomly even though value of address is correct(address is 127.0.0.1 since I run multi-processes on an only machine). The return code of getpeername() is 0 (status = 0). I'm using gcc version 4.8.1. I write a peer 2 peer chat application without server. The following is my code:

struct sockaddr_in addr;
socklen_t addr_len;
int tempPort, serverSockfd;
char test[100];

// Get serverSockfd successfully....
serverSockFd = initializeSock(PORT) // In this function I initialize socket(), bind() and listen(), serverSockFd is returned by the value of socket() 


addr_len = sizeof addr;
newSock = accept(serverSockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&addr, &addr_len);
tempPort = ntohs(addr.sin_port);
inet_ntop(AF_INET, &(addr.sin_addr), test, sizeof test);

printf("tempPort\t%d\n", tempPort);
printf("test\t%s\n", test);

addr_len = sizeof addr; 
if ((status = getpeername(newSock, (struct sockaddr *) &addr, &addr_len)) != 0){  
  printf("getpeername() error!\n");
}

tempPort = ntohs(addr.sin_port);
inet_ntop(AF_INET, &(addr.sin_addr), test, sizeof test);

printf("tempPort\t%d\n", tempPort);
printf("test\t%s\n", test);    

Thanks very much for any your comment. Here is a partial code in initializeSock():

sd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

if(sd < 0)
{
  perror("SocketInit(): socket() error!\n");
  exit(1);
}

ret_val = setsockopt(sd, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, (char*) &flag, sizeof(flag));
if(ret_val == -1)
{
  perror("SocketInit(): setsockopt(SO_REUSEADDR) error!\n");
  exit(1);
}


gethostname(hostname,100);
host_entry = gethostbyname(hostname);
addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
addr.sin_port = htons(port);
addr.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(inet_ntoa(*(struct in_addr *)*host_entry->h_addr_list));

ret_val = bind(sd, (struct sockaddr*) &addr, sizeof(addr));

if(ret_val == -1)
{
  perror("SocketInit(): bind() error!\n");
  printf("For port:%d\n",port);
  exit(1);
}
....
return sd;

This is the code to connect to server part of a peer. ConnectSock(portOfPeerA):

sd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);  

if(sd < 0)
{
  perror("ConnectToServer(): socket() error!\n");
  exit(1);
}

if (port != 0) {

addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
addr.sin_port = htons(portOfPeerA);
addr.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(inet_ntoa(*(struct in_addr *)*host_entry->h_addr_list));

// Do I need to bind() the port of peer B when it would like to connect to peer A? 

ret_val = connect(sd, (struct sockaddr*)&addr, sizeof(addr)); 
if(ret_val == -1)
{
  printf("Error connect());
  exit(1);
}
...
share|improve this question
    
Is there a question here? The code all looks correct and will print the port that the client is bound to correctly. Do you see something else? –  Chris Dodd Apr 12 '14 at 18:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know which port you accept from the peer, but if the peer is connecting to your server (e.g. then one calling accept) it will connect from a (more or less) random port, that's how TCP works. It connects from a fixed port only if the peer explicitly binds to that port before connecting.

This means, that the peers originating port is not defined on the server side (where your code fragments are from) but on the client side (the side which calls connect and where you only do connect but no bind).

But, please note that it might give problems with repeated connections, if both client and server use fixed IP and ports, because then you will get the same 4-tupel in TCP which defines the connections for repeated connections and thus go into all this trouble with the various TIME_WAIT states. So it is better to let the client just pick an available port and not force it to use a specific one.

share|improve this answer
    
This is more or less correct. The TCP stack APIs will find an available port from the ephemeral port range for its local port if the port is unbound. On Linux, this is usually 32768 to 61000, other stacks may use the range 49152 to 65535. –  jxh Apr 12 '14 at 17:54
    
Hi Steffen,thanks very much for your comment. It is a peer 2 peer chat application without server. Let say, I have 2 processes A and B. First I run A as "./p2p groupName serverPortOfA" then I run B like "./p2p groupName serverPortOfB serverPortOfA". A#Server is initialized returns A#ServerSockFd. And then B#Client is initialized, connects to the port of A#Server and returns B#ClientSockFD. In while loop, select() returns A#ServerSockFd in process A, newSock is created. Actually, the value of the port of B is incorrect when I try to call getpeername() in process A. –  zuhakasa Apr 12 '14 at 17:57
    
I added more code in my question. –  zuhakasa Apr 12 '14 at 18:05
1  
I can't follow your comment, but like I said - if you want a TCP connection originate from a specific port you have to explicitly bind the socket to this port, otherwise the system will choose a port on its own. –  Steffen Ullrich Apr 12 '14 at 18:06
    
I already bound the socket to the port as I added the more code in my question. So what do you mean bind here? Doesn't this mean I should call bind() to the port, does it? –  zuhakasa Apr 12 '14 at 18:10

getpeername() (and accept()) reports the IP and port that the remote party is locally bound to on its end. If the remote party is a client that did not call bind() before calling connect() then connect() performs an implicit bind to a random available port. That is what you are seeing, and that it typical usage. Most clients do not need to call bind() before connect(), but there are use cases where doing so is necessary, so don't rule it out.

share|improve this answer
    
I got it. Thanks very much for your comment. –  zuhakasa Apr 12 '14 at 18:37

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