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I get an infinite loop when I use the following code in C++ and I don't understand why. I suspect the problem is within the input_words() function. Here is the code:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

string input_words(int maxWords) {
    int nWord = 0;
    string words[maxWords];
    string aWord = "";
    while (aWord != "Quit" && nWord < maxWords) {
        cout << "Enter a number ('Quit' to stop): ";
        getline (cin, aWord);
        words[nWord] = aWord;
        nWord++;
    }
    return *words;
}

int num_words (string words[], int maxWords) {
    int numWords = 0;
    for (int i=0; i<maxWords; i++) {
        if (words[i] == "Quit") {
            break;
        }
        numWords++;
    }
    return numWords;
}

int main() {

    const int MAX_WORDS = 100;
    string words[MAX_WORDS] = input_words(MAX_WORDS);

    int lenWords = num_words(words, MAX_WORDS);
    cout << "\nThere are " << lenWords << " words:\n";

    for (int i=0; i<MAX_WORDS; i++) {
        if (words[i] == "Quit") {
            break;
        }
        cout << words[i] << "\n";
    }
    return 0;
}

More specifically, I can't exit even when I type 'Quit' when prompted for a word. How could I solve this? I know this is noob code :) I'm just starting on C++

share|improve this question
2  
This should work fine. Also, this is an extension, and not C++: string words[maxWords]; In C++ arrays have a constant size. If you want a dynamic array you should use std::vector<std::string>, and add things to it with push_back. This also removes your need for a maximum size. Lastly, this: return *words; is going to return only the first string. Maybe your intention was to return the entire array, in which case make your return type std::vector<std::string> and return the vector. –  GManNickG Feb 20 '10 at 19:41
    
@GMan: afaik g++ supports dynamically sized arrays on the stack, but be warned this isn't according to the standard. –  JPvdMerwe Feb 20 '10 at 19:50
    
Thanks a lot GMan! I kinda feel you should have posted (or post) this as an answer. I just posted a new question about declaring a vector before I read your comment. I also figured a vector was the way to go, but I didn't succeed to declare it. –  Morlock Feb 20 '10 at 19:52
    
@JP: Thus GMan called it an extension, i.e. an additional feature not defined by the standard. –  Georg Fritzsche Feb 20 '10 at 19:52
    
@JPvdMerwe: How would this g++ issue affect the particular problem? –  Morlock Feb 20 '10 at 19:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I modified the function in such a way:

string input_words(int maxWords) {
    cout << "started" << endl;
    int nWord = 0;
    string words[maxWords];
    string aWord = "";
    while (aWord != "Quit" && nWord < maxWords) {
        cout << "Enter a number ('Quit' to stop): ";
        getline (cin, aWord);
        words[nWord] = aWord;
        nWord++;
    }
    cout << "finished" << endl;
    return *words;
}

After inputting Quit, it prints "finished", and then "started" again. Your code is calling the function several times.

The problem is that the function returns only one string. so the line

string words[MAX_WORDS] = input_words(MAX_WORDS);

seems to call the function input_words MAX_WORDS times.

A good way would be to switch to vector<string>:

vector<string> input_words(int maxWords) {
    vector<string> words;
    string aWord;
    while (aWord != "Quit" && nWord < maxWords) {
        cout << "Enter a number ('Quit' to stop): ";
        getline (cin, aWord);
        words.push_back(aWord);
    }
    return words;
}

...
vector<string> words = input_words(MAX_WORDS);
share|improve this answer
    
Good catch that it calls input_words() MAX_WORDS times. –  Harvey Feb 20 '10 at 20:34
    
@Vlad Indeed, and you suggested it even BEFORE I put the entire code, including the words[MAX_WORDS] bit :) Thanks a lot for the vector implementation, this is exactly where I was headed to, but I find it difficult for a beginner to get information about what C++ methods exits. (I'm coming from Python, where the help() is always ready to be used). Any suggestion of a favorite site where to find this kind of stuff? I just came across cppreference.com/wiki but if there are better or alternative ones, I'm all open! –  Morlock Feb 20 '10 at 20:40
    
@Morlock: for a quick start, I used icce.rug.nl/documents/cplusplus several years ago. stackoverflow.com is actually very good, too! :-) –  Vlad Feb 20 '10 at 20:48
    
@Vlad: I DO believe stackoverflow.com to be great. Up to now, without it, I wouldn't be able to learn C++ ! Thanks for your link, I'll use it. Any other source you use for day to day help? –  Morlock Feb 20 '10 at 20:52
    
@Morlock: I use sgi.com/tech/stl/table_of_contents.html quite often; however it's more a reference than a tutorial. –  Vlad Feb 20 '10 at 21:04

I tried the following test program, it works:

{0,506}$> cat testcin.cpp && make testcin && ./testcin.exe
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    const int maxWords = 5;
    int nWord = 0;
    string words[maxWords];
    string aWord = "";
    while (aWord != "Quit" && nWord < maxWords) {
        cout << "Enter a number ('Quit' to stop): ";
        getline (cin, aWord);
        words[nWord] = aWord;
        nWord++;
    }    
}

make: `testcin' is up to date.
Enter a number ('Quit' to stop): test
Enter a number ('Quit' to stop): Quit

[Vlad@rabbit] [20:53:53] [~/c++]
{0,507}$> 
share|improve this answer

The problem, I think is in your main where you return the result of input_words() which is a string to initialize words in main() which is of type string[]. It's definitely this problem.

Rewritten to use vector:

#include<iostream>
#include<vector>
#include<string>
using namespace std;

vector<string> input_words(int maxWords) {
    int nWord = 0;
    vector<string> words;
    string aWord = "";
    while (aWord != "Quit" && nWord < maxWords) {
        cout << "Enter a number ('Quit' to stop): ";
        getline (cin, aWord);
        words.push_back(aWord);
        nWord++;
    }
    return words;
}

int num_words (vector<string> words) {
    // return words.size();

    int numWords = 0;
    vector<string>::iterator it = words.begin();
    for (; it != words.end(); it++) {
        if (*it == "Quit") {
            break;
        }
        numWords++;
    }
    return numWords;
}

int main() {

    const int MAX_WORDS = 100;
    vector<string> words = input_words(MAX_WORDS);

    int lenWords = num_words(words);
    cout << "\nThere are " << lenWords << " words:\n";

    vector<string>::iterator it = words.begin();
    for (; it != words.end(); it++) {
        if (*it == "Quit") {
            break;
        }
        cout << *it << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

Forget the following, the C++ getline() strips the '\n' automatically.

Have you checked to see if your getline() words have newlines at the end of them? That is,

"Quit" != "Quit\n".
share|improve this answer
    
I had a working implementation of this in a while loop which worked perfectly (a bit like Vlad's answer). I then tried to make a function out of it and got stuck in the infinite loop. I'm editing the question to add the full code, not just the function. –  Morlock Feb 20 '10 at 19:58
1  
Documentation says: If the delimiter is found, it is extracted and discarded, i.e. it is not stored and the next input operation will begin after it. –  Vlad Feb 20 '10 at 19:58
    
@Vlad: yeah I was looking at the C getline by mistake. –  Harvey Feb 20 '10 at 20:06

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